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Famine

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NEWS
May 17, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Omar Khalifa, a champion middle-distance runner from Sudan, arrived in Athens last night for the start of a tour of 12 European cities to promote a series of running events called Sport Aid that will raise funds for African famine. The project was coordinated by Bob Geldof, the man who conceived and promoted last year's African famine-relief effort, Live Aid, a pair of massive pop-music festivals in Philadelhia and London. To promote Sport Aid, Khalifa will appear in runs of 10 kilometers (6.2 miles)
NEWS
June 6, 1988 | By Jonathan Power
The Ethiopian famine deepens by the day. Ethiopia gets whatever press is given over to the hungry. But, let's be frank, the Western world is bored by famine. It awoke with a start to Michael Buerk's television depiction of dying children in Ethiopia in October 1984, was held with its nose to the problem by Bob Geldof and Harry Belafonte and then, the hungry fed, switched off. Now, Ethiopia is in the grip of a major famine once again. Press interest is intermittent. Compassion fatigue has set in. If Ethiopia can't get much attention then forget the rest of the world.
NEWS
August 12, 2011 | By Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton on Thursday described the drought threatening more than 12 million Africans with starvation as a stark reminder of the need to invest in global agriculture and nutrition - Obama administration goals that could be sharply limited if House Republicans get their way. In a speech at the International Food Policy Research Institute, Clinton announced that the United States was providing an additional $17...
NEWS
December 25, 1987 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the long line of hungry people snaked up the mountain for food, it passed a reminder of the last group that trudged through Alamata, desperate and starved. There, on the flat, parched plains of northern Ethiopia, lay mound after mound of dirt. Below each mound are buried the remains of thousands of famine victims who died here two years ago on their way to find food. Tafari Wassen, who saw people die of hunger and disease here in 1984 and 1985, looked now at able-bodied men and women hiking up the mountain.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Mohamed Sheikh Noor and Jason Straziuso, Associated Press
MOGADISHU, Somalia - Kaltum Mohamed sits beside a small mound of earth, alone with her thoughts. It is her child's grave - and there are three others like it. Just three weeks ago, Mohamed was the mother of five young children. But the famine that has rocked Somalia has claimed the lives of four of them. Only a daughter remains. The others starved to death before Mohamed's eyes as she and her husband trekked to Somalia's capital, Mogadishu, in search of aid. Thousands of parents are grieving in Somalia and in refugee camps in neighboring countries amid Somalia's worst drought in 60 years.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | By Claire Furia, Special to The Inquirer
Cyrus Maleki Copeland of St. Davids said he never worked harder on anything in his life than he did on this summer's "Tips for Ethiopia" project. During the two-day program, all waiters, waitresses and bus people at hundreds of area restaurants set aside 10 percent of their tips, to be forwarded by UNICEF to Ethiopia and Sudan. Citizens of those famine-plagued African countries are suffering from starvation, dehydration and disease. Copeland conceived his idea in February 1987 and carried it out at the restaurant where he was working.
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Katharine Houreld, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - Thousands of people died needlessly and millions of dollars were wasted because the international community did not respond fast enough to early signs of famine in East Africa, aid agencies said Wednesday, while warning of a new hunger crisis in West Africa. Most rich donor nations waited until the crisis in the Horn of Africa was in full swing before donating a substantial amount of money, according to the report by the aid groups Oxfam and Save the Children. A food shortage had been predicted as early as August 2010, but most donors did not respond until famine was declared in parts of Somalia in July 2011.
LIVING
March 16, 1986 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wretched, starved and desperate, the refugees from the tragic Irish potato famine struck the American shores like the flotsam of a hellish sea. In the confusion of their arrival, record-keeping barely existed. The Irish refugees stumbled from the often crowded, filthy ships after spending four to six weeks on the heaving ocean and were soon lost in the antic weft of East Coast port cities. But there was one place at which their names were written down - in the manifests of the ships that transported them to the New World.
NEWS
December 12, 1987 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
The old patriarch Gebre Hailu led his people down the mountain. There was no food left in the village called Shemaye, a dry patch of rocky gray earth in the northern Ethiopian highlands. Everyone had sold their goats and oxen for money to buy food. Some had torn down their huts for firewood. Once again, the time had come to trek down to Wukro for donated food. "Even last time, we had some rain," Gebre said of the 1984-85 drought and famine that killed his brother and sister.
NEWS
September 14, 1986 | By Blaine Harden, Washington Post
It dawned on the industrialized nations two years ago that something was going terribly wrong in Africa. That was when starving babies forced themselves into the consciousness of a developed world awash in surplus food, while 35 million people in 20 African countries were at risk of starvation due to drought. Since then, rains have come and the immediate threat of catastrophe has passed. But the specter of famine in the late 20th century has pushed international agencies to look more closely at why Africa is so vulnerable, and to assess the chances of even worse disasters in the near future.
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NEWS
July 14, 2015 | BY DICK MEYER
ECONOMIC POPULISM is having a moment of celebrity these days. But so is economic gluttony. These conflicting impulses - equality vs. liberty - have been in constant competition. For some, equality of opportunity and outcomes is the ultimate political value; for others, it is liberty, which is degraded when property rights are too restricted by taxation and regulation. There is a view in both parties that voters are in an egalitarian mood. I don't buy it. The icon of economic gluttony in politics today is Donald Trump, however grotesque and trivial that may seem.
SPORTS
April 21, 2015 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
WHEN CHIP KELLY makes his first draft pick two Thursdays from now, he will do so exactly 1 year to the date this town last had a whiff of the postseason. The Rangers eliminated the Flyers that night, beginning a famine that already has included a long summer of bad baseball, the late-season collapse of Kelly's Eagles, the predictable and somewhat hoped-for futility of the Sixers, and the sloppy start and bad finish of the Flyers. It's a famine that is all but certain to last into next year, too - even if Kelly's collection of risk-reward players proves his genius, and not just his hubris.
NEWS
March 10, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's called a "famine church," built by Irish who fled starvation in their homeland to make new lives in Philadelphia. The history of St. Malachy Parish is carved into its walls and ceilings, evident in the shamrocks on the altar and the tilework based on the Book of Kells. Now, more than 160 years after its founding, its heart beats strong but its bones need work. On Sunday, parishioners gathered for the third annual Hibernian Mass and Concert - and the start of a campaign aimed at raising $200,000 for critical maintenance during the next five years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
SOMEONE in Barbara Walters ' camp needs to look up the word "fascinating. " What could be her final show presenting the "10 Most Fascinating People" of the year is seriously lacking in the fascination factor. Two stars from "Duck Dynasty"? Daffy Duck is more fascinating. Prince George ? He's a baby. Not fascinating. Except to his parents. Robin Roberts ? Anyone whom you can spend every morning with is good company, but not that fascinating. Edward Snowden ?
NEWS
October 1, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Twenty-eight years ago, Randall Claggett moved from Florida to Montgomery County and was blown away by what he saw - stained glass all over the place. Not just in churches, but also in homes, businesses, museums, and estates. For Claggett, the brilliantly hued panes combined the best of both worlds: art and income. "In Florida, they don't say, 'Oh, you can be a stained-glass artist.' It's just unheard of there," Claggett, 48, of North Wales, said. "I jumped in full force and clawed my way to where I am. " Over the last 25 years, Claggett's Castle Studios has weathered the ups and downs of the economy to become one of the state's premier stained-glass studios, specializing in restoration of historic windows.
NEWS
May 4, 2013 | By Jason Straziuso, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - A decision by Islamic extremists to ban delivery of food aid and a "normalization of crisis" that numbed international donors to disaster made south-central Somalia the most dangerous place in the world to be a child. The first in-depth study of famine deaths in Somalia in 2011 was released Thursday, and it estimates that 133,000 children under age 5 died, with child death rates approaching 20 percent in some communities. That's 133,000 under-5 child deaths out of an estimated 6.5 million people in south-central Somalia.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | By Jason Straziuso, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - The 2011 Somali famine killed an estimated 260,000 people, according to a new report to be published this week, officials told the Associated Press. The total more than doubles previous estimates, and half of the victims were age 5 and younger. The aid community believes tens of thousands of people died needlessly because the international community was slow to respond to early signs of approaching hunger in East Africa in late 2010 and early 2011. The toll was also exacerbated by extremist militants from al-Shabab who banned food-aid deliveries to the areas of south-central Somalia that they controlled.
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Katharine Houreld, Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya - Thousands of people died needlessly and millions of dollars were wasted because the international community did not respond fast enough to early signs of famine in East Africa, aid agencies said Wednesday, while warning of a new hunger crisis in West Africa. Most rich donor nations waited until the crisis in the Horn of Africa was in full swing before donating a substantial amount of money, according to the report by the aid groups Oxfam and Save the Children. A food shortage had been predicted as early as August 2010, but most donors did not respond until famine was declared in parts of Somalia in July 2011.
NEWS
September 25, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writers
With a degree in economics, Yevgeniy Levich, 23, may understand better than most why so many people his age are out of work. He blames the lack of jobs on a myriad of reasons: the lack of regulation in banking that led to this economic crisis; a failed theory that lowering taxes leads to investment; a proposal for infrastructure jobs that doesn't do much for someone who doesn't work with his hands - that's all the macro stuff. Microeconomics is this: Levich, a Central High School graduate with degrees in economics and journalism from New York University, is still living with his parents in Northeast Philadelphia and hoping that he'll land a job as a nightclub office assistant.
NEWS
September 6, 2011
Judge: Chirac can skip his trial PARIS - Former French President Jacques Chirac won't have to attend his long-awaited corruption trial, a judge ruled Monday, after Chirac's lawyers said the 78-year-old was suffering severe memory lapses. Judge Dominique Pauthe said he took into account a written appeal and medical report sent by Chirac's defense team and decided the trial would be allowed to go ahead without the former president in court. "Jacques Chirac will thus be judged in his absence," Pauthe said.
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