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Famous Women

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NEWS
July 18, 1987 | By David Raudenbush, Special to The Inquirer
Marion L. McGloughlin, 74, of Collingswood, a businesswoman and active parent-teacher association member, died Thursday at West Jersey Health System, Camden. Mrs. McGloughlin and her husband owned Max Hardware in Collingswood for 28 years until they retired in 1973. She was active in the Collingswood PTA and the state PTA for 45 years. At the time of her death, she was treasurer of the PTA 25-year group, an organization for people who have been active members for more than 25 years.
NEWS
July 10, 1987 | Edited by Kathleen Shea from the Associated Press, USA Today, the New York Post and the New York Daily News
THE I'M OK, YOU'RE OK CORRAL Reporters and photogs were staking out stately old Joan Collins' mansion this morning after her about-to-be-ex-husband, Peter Holm, threatened to drill anybody who tries to remove him from the premises. "Anybody who tries to force entry here will be shot. There's going to be a battle here," Holm told the Associated Press in a phone interview last night. "We have instructed our security people to take over the premises," said Collins' lawyer, Marvelous Marvin Mitchelson.
NEWS
March 1, 1998 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Burlington County, asserts Rhett Pernot, has been the home of more notable women in its 303-year history than population statistics would suggest. "You'd expect in a big city like Philadelphia that there would be many prominent women throughout the city's history," said Pernot, executive director of the county Historical Society. "But even though Burlington County has yet to surpass the half-million mark in population, there have been so many famous women throughout the county's history.
NEWS
March 14, 2004
With Martha Stewart's conviction and possible imprisonment having put many people in a tizzy, Pop Quiz takes a look back at other famous women who have been incarcerated: 1. What nickname did Patty Hearst, at right, use during the time she spent with the Symbionese Liberation Army, doing deeds that earned her 22 months in jail? 2. Which of the following queens did not spend time imprisoned: a. Eleanor of Aquitaine b. Elizabeth I of England c. Mary, Queen of Scots d. Catherine of Aragon e. Marie Antoinette.
NEWS
January 22, 2004 | By Mary T. Previte
I saw America in the making the other day. Presidents may judge the state of the union. I got an inside look at the state of America's young women when I judged a stack of applications for a college scholarship. American Water, a major national employer that serves our area, sponsored the program and called it "Hoops and Heroes. " It targeted female high school basketball players from around the country. The applications that I judged were from all over New Jersey. How times have changed!
NEWS
July 6, 1988 | By AMY ALEXANDER, Daily News Staff Writer
You're probably tired of predictable summer "beach books" and the same old, predictable terms used to describe them. Clever buzzwords like "light reading," "page-turner" and so on. Well, here are a few books offering what we prefer to call "intelligent distraction" (i.e., highbrow sleaze), and "historic interest" (i.e. highfalutin' celeb gossip). "Picasso: Creator and Destroyer" (Simon and Schuster, $22.95), by Arianna Stassinopoulos Huffington, has all the markings of a successful shore tome.
NEWS
December 6, 1997 | By Peter H. Gibbon
Shortly after her husband's assassination, Jacqueline Kennedy wrote: "For Jack, history was full of heroes . . . . Jack had this hero idea of history. " How quaint she seems, how naive and sentimental. Now Jack frolics in the White House pool with call girls and plots how best to kill Fidel Castro. We listen on the White House phone as Lyndon Johnson bullies, to tapes of Richard Nixon as he swears and vows revenge. We read descriptions of our president's penis. For us, there are no heroes.
NEWS
April 4, 1996 | By Louis S. Hansen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
She was Emily Dickinson, for a day. For 16-year-old Nikki Petrowicz, playing the eccentric 19th-century poet on stage last week at Methacton High School brought her some valuable insight into her identity. "We all have something different to offer," she said. "You shouldn't suppress your talents just because you're a woman. " That message is the focus of the Women's Performance Group, a three-year-old club devoted to women's issues. It allows about 40 young women to express their talents through dance, theater and art. It is a bit of Gertrude Stein's Paris salon mixed with the fitful energy of a yearbook staff meeting.
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
They aren't love letters - not even close. Forty years ago, writer Mercedes de Acosta gave the Rosenbach Museum in Philadelphia 55 letters she'd received from the glamorous Greta Garbo on condition that they not be opened until 10 years after both women were dead. That time came on Saturday. The museum closed its doors while the staff opened the container labeled "Box 12, restricted" which had been sealed for so long. An exhibit of those contents called "Garbo Unsealed" opens at the museum today.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Petula Dvorak, Washington Post
She said her baby is "easy" - curse you, CEO Marissa Mayer. Another woman said raising five kids "was hard work" - curse you, too, first-lady runner-up Ann Romney. After seeing all the jackal attacks on famous women who talk about motherhood, I'm sure that Buckingham Palace is already putting together a PR strategy for how newly announced preggo Kate Middleton should talk about her royal baby. With all of the choices facing women today, there is one discomforting constant: Someone will always be there to tell us we're doing it wrong, whatever we're doing.
NEWS
March 14, 2004
With Martha Stewart's conviction and possible imprisonment having put many people in a tizzy, Pop Quiz takes a look back at other famous women who have been incarcerated: 1. What nickname did Patty Hearst, at right, use during the time she spent with the Symbionese Liberation Army, doing deeds that earned her 22 months in jail? 2. Which of the following queens did not spend time imprisoned: a. Eleanor of Aquitaine b. Elizabeth I of England c. Mary, Queen of Scots d. Catherine of Aragon e. Marie Antoinette.
NEWS
January 22, 2004 | By Mary T. Previte
I saw America in the making the other day. Presidents may judge the state of the union. I got an inside look at the state of America's young women when I judged a stack of applications for a college scholarship. American Water, a major national employer that serves our area, sponsored the program and called it "Hoops and Heroes. " It targeted female high school basketball players from around the country. The applications that I judged were from all over New Jersey. How times have changed!
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
They aren't love letters - not even close. Forty years ago, writer Mercedes de Acosta gave the Rosenbach Museum in Philadelphia 55 letters she'd received from the glamorous Greta Garbo on condition that they not be opened until 10 years after both women were dead. That time came on Saturday. The museum closed its doors while the staff opened the container labeled "Box 12, restricted" which had been sealed for so long. An exhibit of those contents called "Garbo Unsealed" opens at the museum today.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2000 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are some women whose lives are so interesting and entertaining we could listen to them talk for hours - and then there are the rest of us. Mary Tyler Moore, Lesley Stahl, Coretta Scott King, Ann Richards and Anna Quindlen surely belong to the first group. The rest of us can hear them speak - and even ask a few questions - when they appear at Wilmington's Playhouse Theater as part of a women's lecture series. "Unique Lives & Experiences" kicks off Jan. 19 with Mary Tyler Moore; Lesley Stahl, cohost of 60 Minutes, follows on Feb. 22; Coretta Scott King, widow of the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., on March 15; former Texas Gov. Ann Richards on April 12; and novelist and Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Anna Quindlen on May 24. The series is sold by subscription only, with prices for the five lectures at $189 and $229 until Jan. 15, when they rise to $209 and $249 (for balcony and orchestra, respectively)
NEWS
June 14, 1998
Which women do today's students most admire? Overwhelmingly, their moms. For Part 3 of our "Women in the '90s" series, we asked students to analyze images of women from the movies, TV and radio; the workplace; school; church, and home. How do they measure up? Students easily distinguished fantasy (women in the media) from reality (women they know), with a clear preference for reality. They pointed out contradictions in the interest of entertainment, such as one student's observation about the sitcom Suddenly Susan: "Women are intelligent enough to write for a popular magazine; however, they lack the common sense of most small children.
NEWS
March 1, 1998 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Burlington County, asserts Rhett Pernot, has been the home of more notable women in its 303-year history than population statistics would suggest. "You'd expect in a big city like Philadelphia that there would be many prominent women throughout the city's history," said Pernot, executive director of the county Historical Society. "But even though Burlington County has yet to surpass the half-million mark in population, there have been so many famous women throughout the county's history.
NEWS
December 6, 1997 | By Peter H. Gibbon
Shortly after her husband's assassination, Jacqueline Kennedy wrote: "For Jack, history was full of heroes . . . . Jack had this hero idea of history. " How quaint she seems, how naive and sentimental. Now Jack frolics in the White House pool with call girls and plots how best to kill Fidel Castro. We listen on the White House phone as Lyndon Johnson bullies, to tapes of Richard Nixon as he swears and vows revenge. We read descriptions of our president's penis. For us, there are no heroes.
NEWS
April 4, 1996 | By Louis S. Hansen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
She was Emily Dickinson, for a day. For 16-year-old Nikki Petrowicz, playing the eccentric 19th-century poet on stage last week at Methacton High School brought her some valuable insight into her identity. "We all have something different to offer," she said. "You shouldn't suppress your talents just because you're a woman. " That message is the focus of the Women's Performance Group, a three-year-old club devoted to women's issues. It allows about 40 young women to express their talents through dance, theater and art. It is a bit of Gertrude Stein's Paris salon mixed with the fitful energy of a yearbook staff meeting.
LIVING
June 15, 1993 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
One type of 1960s figure - a B-movie producer - might have titled the film version Where the Boys Aren't. Another - an anti-establishment activist - would have asked a question with a familiar period tone. Suppose they gave a gigantic conference on women's history, and no men came? Call it what you will, the Ninth Berkshire Conference on the History of Women - the latest reappearance of a mass conversation that began in 1973, just after the decade of new beginnings - is now herstory.
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