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Farm Sanctuary

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LIVING
November 4, 2009 | By Samantha Melamed FOR THE INQUIRER
Of all the animals that have come to Chenoa Manor, the geese were the worst off. Originally intended for the French delicacy foie gras, some of the birds were so obese that they couldn't walk, and none knew how to eat, as they had been force-fed their entire lives. So Rob Teti, a Chester County veterinarian with a soft spot for all creatures in distress, put the geese in with his chickens, so they could watch and learn how to peck at food. Thankfully, they turned out to be quick studies.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2007
Here's a novel idea: Don't eat turkey this year; adopt one. There's a warm, if wattled, side to the critters, according to Susie Coston, national shelter director for Farm Sanctuary, which places turkeys for adoption around the country. "Most people don't realize what great companions turkeys can be," she said. "They are social, sensitive creatures, capable of feeling joy and pain, much like one's cat or dog. " Not feeling the love for an unplucked bird? Eat your drumstick and spare one, too, by sending a $20 donation to Sanctuary.
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Unlike her husband, former Daily Show host Jon Stewart, Tracey Stewart isn't comfortable in front of cameras - something she isn't shy about acknowledging. But she stood in front of more than a dozen reporters at a private animal-rehabilitation center in Kennett Square, Chester County, on Wednesday to gush about a new member of the Stewart family - Lily, the horse found malnourished and splattered with paint in Lancaster County in March. "She is just the sweetest, sweetest horse I've ever met," Stewart said.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | By Dan Cornwell, Special to The Inquirer
For the Thanksgiving reveler with an environmental conscience, Gloria Feldscher-Cohen is a woman ready to talk turkey. As a member of the Farm Sanctuary adopt-a-turkey program, she can credit herself with saving at least one feathered life among the 27 million slated for slaughter this week. The idea behind the program, according to a letter Feldscher-Cohen sent to area newspapers, is to "feed a turkey, rather than feed on one. " Feldscher-Cohen, who lives in Gulph Mills, said her interest in Farm Sanctuary originally was motivated by concerns about the way turkeys are raised.
NEWS
November 23, 1986 | By Elizabeth Hallowell, Special to The Inquirer
Clyde the turkey was stuffed. He and five of his feathered friends, all guests of honor at a vegetarian Thanksgiving dinner yesterday afternoon, had just feasted on organically grown grain. While the turkeys lolled contentedly in a backyard pen, about 30 animal- rights activists and guests gobbled up such vegetarian delights as "wheat meat" flavored with soy sauce, baked and stuffed hubbard squash and pumpkin pie made with tofu. The meatless feast, held in a rowhouse that serves as national headquarters for an animal rights group called Farm Sanctuary, celebrated the recent "liberation" of Clyde and nine other turkeys from their cages on farms throughout the Delmarva peninsula.
NEWS
November 21, 2001
Good question What are the odds of a man becoming president and there being a war against a Middle Eastern country - and then his son becoming president and there being another war against a Middle Eastern country? Mark F . Walker, Philadelphia The vegan way Thank you for including articles on "alternative" diets, such as vegan and vegetarian (Nov. 14). Not everyone consumes animal-based foods. Jay Hamburger, Houston Thank you so much for your vegan articles - you set a wonderful example.
NEWS
November 19, 1998 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Bucks County couple paid $20 yesterday morning for two live turkeys that they promised not to eat. It was part of an effort by Farm Sanctuary, a national animal-rights organization, to encourage people "to have a vegetarian Thanksgiving once they . . . see that they are living, feeling animals. " So what does the Bucks couple intend to feast on, come Thanksgiving? "We'll have turkey, at my sister-in-law's in Roxborough," said Theresa Grimes, standing with her husband, Tom, in a field at their home in New Britain Township.
NEWS
June 5, 1986 | By Alison Carper, Special to The Inquirer (United Press International contributed to this article.)
A previously unknown animal-rights group said that it staged a predawn raid yesterday on a Delaware egg farm, spray-painted the words Animal Auschwitz on a henhouse wall and took 25 birds from their cages. A spokesman for the Farm Freedom Fighters said through the president of another animal-rights organization that the raid was the first of many planned in an attempt to free farm animals from abuse and to publicize the animals' plight. Yesterday's raid was at Sydel's Egg Farm in Hartly, west of Dover.
NEWS
November 22, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
GOBBLERS GOBBLE UP HEAPS OF ATTENTION AT FEAST Seven plump turkeys were the main attraction at Karin Yates' pre- Thanksgiving dinner in Pittsboro, N.C., and they weren't even the main course. They were among more than 100 turkeys rescued in August after their containers fell off a truck. A group called Farm Sanctuary, based in Watkins Glen, N.Y., raised the turkeys as pets for its national "Adopt-A-Turkey" program, and brought them to what's been the nation's top turkey-growing state for a decade, producing 61 million birds just this year.
NEWS
May 13, 2005 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Where's the beef? He's 1,500 pounds and piebald, and has been on the lam for more than a month. Yesterday, police in two South Jersey counties continued to search for a red-and-white steer that escaped certain death as he was being unloaded April 16 at a Berlin Township slaughterhouse. The hefty Hereford was last spotted May 2 in Evesham. "What's amazing to me is how he made it from Berlin to Voorhees and Evesham," said Sgt. Jane Donohue of the New Jersey SPCA. "It's close to 20 miles!"
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Unlike her husband, former Daily Show host Jon Stewart, Tracey Stewart isn't comfortable in front of cameras - something she isn't shy about acknowledging. But she stood in front of more than a dozen reporters at a private animal-rehabilitation center in Kennett Square, Chester County, on Wednesday to gush about a new member of the Stewart family - Lily, the horse found malnourished and splattered with paint in Lancaster County in March. "She is just the sweetest, sweetest horse I've ever met," Stewart said.
NEWS
June 26, 2015
ISSUE | STORM DAMAGE Amtrak planning The stranding of Amtrak passengers for hours Tuesday night in Chester County on a train from Harrisburg appears to be an extra helping of Amtrak incompetence ("Half-million lose power as storms rip through," June 24). There is no special obstacle along the tracks in Chester County to de-boarding passengers and putting them on a bus or, at a minimum, delivering relief supplies. Or even sending a diesel to drag them to Philly. Amtrak's persistent refusal to prepare contingency plans for reasonably anticipated emergencies stands in contrast to cruise ship operators, who are required to have lifeboat drills.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before the tryptophan kicks in, take a minute to thank our culture's greatest gift to humanity: The reality star. We thank you, Kate Gosselin , you, faithful New York hausfrau Bethenny Frankel , and most of all, you, beloved 72-day bride, Kim Kardashian . The stars also give thanks of their own. Lil Wayne flew back home to New Orleans, to hand out free turkeys. For her part, daytime gabber Ellen DeGeneres wants to save the turkeys from their cruel bondage. Ellen is the spokesperson for Farm Sanctuary's Adopt-a-Turkey Project.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By JASON NARK & WILLIAM BENDER, narkj@phillynews.com 215-854-5916
Only the flies are free to come and go at a stinky warehouse in Upper Darby that advertises fresh meat. The yellow street sign outside the Madina Live Poultry Co., on Fourth Street just off Baltimore Pike, says fresh lamb, goats and chickens are right inside, past the barbed-wire fence. "00% Halal fresh," reads the sign, which has lost a "1. " The manure-like smell invades your nostrils the closer you get. Inside, a turkey sits on the floor in a cage, along with smaller birds on a shelf.
NEWS
November 16, 2010 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Authorities are conducting autopsies to determine how 925 pigs were left to die in a barn in south-central Pennsylvania - and to decide whether to charge anyone with a crime. The pigs' carcasses were found in various states of decay last Monday, scattered inside a warehouse-style barn on a farm in Warfordsburg, near the Maryland border. "We are trying to determine exactly what happened," said State Police Lt. Gregory Bacher, adding that he has never seen an apparent act of animal cruelty of this magnitude in 26 years on the job. "There are some factors we can't release now. " The farm's owner, Daniel Clark, left the property in August, authorities said, and the pigs appeared to have been dead for several months.
LIVING
November 4, 2009 | By Samantha Melamed FOR THE INQUIRER
Of all the animals that have come to Chenoa Manor, the geese were the worst off. Originally intended for the French delicacy foie gras, some of the birds were so obese that they couldn't walk, and none knew how to eat, as they had been force-fed their entire lives. So Rob Teti, a Chester County veterinarian with a soft spot for all creatures in distress, put the geese in with his chickens, so they could watch and learn how to peck at food. Thankfully, they turned out to be quick studies.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2007
Here's a novel idea: Don't eat turkey this year; adopt one. There's a warm, if wattled, side to the critters, according to Susie Coston, national shelter director for Farm Sanctuary, which places turkeys for adoption around the country. "Most people don't realize what great companions turkeys can be," she said. "They are social, sensitive creatures, capable of feeling joy and pain, much like one's cat or dog. " Not feeling the love for an unplucked bird? Eat your drumstick and spare one, too, by sending a $20 donation to Sanctuary.
NEWS
May 13, 2005 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Where's the beef? He's 1,500 pounds and piebald, and has been on the lam for more than a month. Yesterday, police in two South Jersey counties continued to search for a red-and-white steer that escaped certain death as he was being unloaded April 16 at a Berlin Township slaughterhouse. The hefty Hereford was last spotted May 2 in Evesham. "What's amazing to me is how he made it from Berlin to Voorhees and Evesham," said Sgt. Jane Donohue of the New Jersey SPCA. "It's close to 20 miles!"
NEWS
June 6, 2004 | By Jill Schensul FOR THE INQUIRER
He is a big man, with thick mitts for hands and biceps bulging out of his cutoff sweatshirt. He straightens up from his raking and seems to fill the small barn entirely. "I go for bunnies," Mike Bobniz confesses, glancing down at several dozen rabbits nosing in the newly spread bedding. His wife, Linda, puts down a bucket of rabbit manna and adds, "We have rabbits at home in Cleveland. " So when they arrive at Best Friends Animal Sanctuary here for their annual volunteer vacation week, they sign up for the Bunny House.
NEWS
November 21, 2001
Good question What are the odds of a man becoming president and there being a war against a Middle Eastern country - and then his son becoming president and there being another war against a Middle Eastern country? Mark F . Walker, Philadelphia The vegan way Thank you for including articles on "alternative" diets, such as vegan and vegetarian (Nov. 14). Not everyone consumes animal-based foods. Jay Hamburger, Houston Thank you so much for your vegan articles - you set a wonderful example.
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