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Farm Town

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NEWS
September 26, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A former mental patient suspected in three slayings continued to elude police officers yesterday, and residents of this farm town grew increasingly tense and angry that he might still be in their midst. Michael Wayne Jackson, 41, is accused of three murders - two in Indiana and one in Missouri - six abductions and at least seven car thefts. Because there have been no reports of missing persons or vehicle thefts in the search area, authorities believe he remains holed up somewhere in or near Wright City.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | Associated Press
WEST, Texas - Rescuers searched the smoking remnants of a Texas farm town Thursday for survivors of a thunderous fertilizer-plant explosion, gingerly checking smashed houses and apartments for anyone still trapped in debris while the community awaited word on the number of dead. Initial reports put the number of fatalities as high as 15, but later in the day, authorities backed away from any estimate. More than 160 people were hurt. A breathtaking band of destruction extended for blocks around the West Fertilizer Co. in the small community of West.
NEWS
June 9, 1999 | By Denise-Marie Balona, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As more and more of this booming town turns into roads, hotels and housing developments, officials worry that there will be no room left for playing fields and nature trails. With a little help from the state and some input from residents at a township hearing tonight, though, officials will be able to preserve a few tracts. Mount Laurel wants to develop a plan for preserving space and controlling growth to take advantage of a state Department of Environmental Protection program that matches township funds for preservation projects - 25 percent with a grant and 75 percent with a low-interest loan.
NEWS
November 27, 1998 | By Geneva Overholser
This California city has the sunny, slow, wide-open feel of a farm town. Indeed, Fresno County is the nation's top agricultural producer. It's stunningly diverse. Whites ceased to be the majority in 1988. Latinos will be the majority by 2005 or so, and Asians and African Americans are well-represented. Call it a slice of America's future: A community with farm-bred values whose face has changed in a generation. You'll find uneasiness and anxiety here - but also excitement and hope - and some truly remarkable people.
NEWS
June 14, 1999 | By Denise-Marie Balona, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Marianne Kunnemann lounges on the front porch of her Cape Cod most afternoons, waving to passersby. Some motorists traveling along busy Moorestown-Mount Laurel Road honk, and she smiles. Some return the greeting; others ignore her. But that's fine: Kunnemann's wrists are getting a bit tired these days. "You wouldn't believe it," she said. "Traffic is horrendous. " When the teacher moved to Mount Laurel in 1994, roughly 33,000 people called this former farm town their home.
NEWS
November 7, 1992 | By ALEXANDER COCKBURN
Each American town, answering the quest for symbolism that election season brings, offers its own lesson and portent. One Saturday afternoon a month ago, I stood in Bloomington's Mall of America, just south of Minneapolis-St Paul. It's the largest mall in the world and no doubt archaeologists of the future will excavate it as prime locus of the American dream, albeit a dream trembling on the edge of Chapter 11. Anchored at its four corners by Macy's, Bloomingdales, Nordstrom and Sears, it shelters boutiques, restaurants, cinemas and, at its heart, Camp Snoopy, a vast interior playground replete with carousels, slides, and roller coaster rides.
NEWS
January 28, 2009 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Other than a dogwood tree, planted on his first birthday by his Pennsylvania Dutch grandfather, there is not much evidence that John Updike once lived in Shillington, a former farm town just outside Reading. The local library carries his books, but few people check them out. And many of the younger generation aren't even sure who he is. But yesterday, news of Updike's death stunned the older folks who remember the young "Uppy," a talented writer and cartoonist at the former Shillington High School who went on to make his life - and his hometown - a main subject of his work.
REAL_ESTATE
August 13, 1995 | By Jill P. Capuzzo, FOR THE INQUIRER
Chuck Heal took a long drag on his pipe during a rare break behind C.S. Heal's Farm Market on Salem Road. "Once, agriculture supported this whole community. Now, you can't even get your tractor repaired without taking it to Lancaster County. They're just not farming-minded here anymore," said Heal after unloading tomatoes trucked in from more "farm-minded" communities nearby, such as Swedesboro. Purchasing fruits and vegetables to sell at the 40-year-old farm stand has become a necessity for the Heals, as they've had to sell off their farmland over the years.
LIVING
October 11, 1994 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is a cool, clear morning in the South Jersey Pine Barrens, where a steady wind is blowing over the fields and bogs of Sam Moore's berry farm. Pine boughs are swaying in the distance. A gust sprints visibly across a field and arrives in ripples atop the closest bog, sending this morning's harvest - a floating carpet of cranberries - bobbing to the south end. "This wind is perfect," marvels the hired hand, Ralph Michael, who is standing atop one of the dikes in a pair of chest-high rubber waders.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1996 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some jobs bore humans silly. They lull them into day-dreams, even to sleep. Dangerous things get spilled and people get hurt or killed. Scores of scientists and engineers are working on this costly problem. Thus far they've come up with newfangled devices and training programs that help farmers, truck drivers and railroad engineers, among others, stay vigilant. Kerien W. Fitzpatrick and Walter Pype are taking a different, decidedly bolder approach. They're developing a new worker that never gets bored, follows orders with precision, and always responds to hazards in a flash.
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NEWS
April 19, 2013 | Associated Press
WEST, Texas - Rescuers searched the smoking remnants of a Texas farm town Thursday for survivors of a thunderous fertilizer-plant explosion, gingerly checking smashed houses and apartments for anyone still trapped in debris while the community awaited word on the number of dead. Initial reports put the number of fatalities as high as 15, but later in the day, authorities backed away from any estimate. More than 160 people were hurt. A breathtaking band of destruction extended for blocks around the West Fertilizer Co. in the small community of West.
SPORTS
September 11, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. - The day the world changed, their tiny corner of it shook. The dozen or so Shanksville-Stonycreek High students who now play football for a combined-school team were first and second graders when, on 9/11/01, United Flight 93 ended at an abandoned strip mine just two miles away. "We were there in Mrs. Dunn's room," said junior tackle Ben Duppstadt, gesturing to a point down the long highway at his school, which then as now houses kindergartners through 12th graders.
NEWS
January 28, 2009 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Other than a dogwood tree, planted on his first birthday by his Pennsylvania Dutch grandfather, there is not much evidence that John Updike once lived in Shillington, a former farm town just outside Reading. The local library carries his books, but few people check them out. And many of the younger generation aren't even sure who he is. But yesterday, news of Updike's death stunned the older folks who remember the young "Uppy," a talented writer and cartoonist at the former Shillington High School who went on to make his life - and his hometown - a main subject of his work.
NEWS
March 26, 2008 | By Adrienne Lu INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Small towns, farms and the environment will all suffer if the budget proposed by Gov. Corzine is adopted by the Legislature, advocates warned yesterday. Dozens of lobbyists and residents made their pitches and pleas in the third public hearing before the Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee. The hearing at Gloucester County Institute of Technology was the group's first in South Jersey. Meanwhile, in Trenton, David Rosen, the state's nonpartisan legislative budget and finance officer, told Assembly lawmakers that the slowing economy could result in the state collecting at least $289 million less in taxes in the next fiscal year than was previously estimated by Corzine.
NEWS
February 11, 2004 | By Frank Wilson INQUIRER BOOKS EDITOR
The literary and artistic legacy of Doylestown and its environs is so rich you could write a book about it. Actually, there is such a book. It's called The Genius Belt (Michener Museum/Penn State, $29.95). A collection of essays edited by George S. Bush, a onetime editor at the Saturday Evening Post, it boasts an informative introduction by James A. Michener, who himself loomed large in the aforementioned legacy, and a delightfully chatty account by biographer Dorothy Herrmann of the writers who lived thereabouts.
NEWS
July 22, 2001 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Urban brothers say it seems like every week a car they haven't seen before pulls into their gravel driveway, bearing some new proposition. And if it isn't someone coming in person to make an offer for their land, it's the letters or telephone calls that come in daily. The next pitch may be coming from West Deptford taxpayers. George and Robert Urban have worked their land on Ogden Road by the banks of Mantua Creek since 1936, and have owned the 120 acres since their parents passed away more than 50 years ago. But, after decades of farming crops like watermelon, tomatoes and asparagus, the Urbans are now at an impasse.
NEWS
June 14, 1999 | By Denise-Marie Balona, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Marianne Kunnemann lounges on the front porch of her Cape Cod most afternoons, waving to passersby. Some motorists traveling along busy Moorestown-Mount Laurel Road honk, and she smiles. Some return the greeting; others ignore her. But that's fine: Kunnemann's wrists are getting a bit tired these days. "You wouldn't believe it," she said. "Traffic is horrendous. " When the teacher moved to Mount Laurel in 1994, roughly 33,000 people called this former farm town their home.
NEWS
June 9, 1999 | By Denise-Marie Balona, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As more and more of this booming town turns into roads, hotels and housing developments, officials worry that there will be no room left for playing fields and nature trails. With a little help from the state and some input from residents at a township hearing tonight, though, officials will be able to preserve a few tracts. Mount Laurel wants to develop a plan for preserving space and controlling growth to take advantage of a state Department of Environmental Protection program that matches township funds for preservation projects - 25 percent with a grant and 75 percent with a low-interest loan.
NEWS
November 27, 1998 | By Geneva Overholser
This California city has the sunny, slow, wide-open feel of a farm town. Indeed, Fresno County is the nation's top agricultural producer. It's stunningly diverse. Whites ceased to be the majority in 1988. Latinos will be the majority by 2005 or so, and Asians and African Americans are well-represented. Call it a slice of America's future: A community with farm-bred values whose face has changed in a generation. You'll find uneasiness and anxiety here - but also excitement and hope - and some truly remarkable people.
SPORTS
December 7, 1997 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Change moves slowly in Bobby Hoying's hometown. It plods along like the big tractor that caused a noteworthy three-car backup Friday at St. Henry's lone traffic light, just outside the most aptly named accounting firm anywhere, Boring & Associates. This farming community in northwest Ohio, 10 miles from the Indiana border, was settled in 1837 by German Catholics migrating north from Cincinnati. No one, despite the rich soil, ever bothered to follow them. One-hundred-and-sixty years later, St. Henry is one of America's most homogenous towns.
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