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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
At farmers' markets this season, alongside the kale and radishes, there are unaccustomed local offerings. Think tulsi bitters for digestion and relaxation, elderberry syrup for immune support, or raspberry leaf tea for pregnant women. Also new to farmers' market shoppers: disclaimers - that the wares are "not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. " This is an offshoot of the farm-to-table movement: Call it the farm-to-medicine-cabinet movement. It's powered by a new generation of farmer-herbalists like Amanda Midkiff, 26, who last year started Locust Light Farm in New Hope, one of a growing number of farm-based apothecaries in the area.
NEWS
August 29, 1986 | By Keith W. Eckel
The United States is calling the bluff of the European Community by throwing the U.S. treasury against treasuries of the European nations. It is a battle that neither can really afford to continue at length, but it's the heavy ammunition that U.S. agriculture has needed to combat cheap imports and high subsidies from its foreign competitors. Through the passage of the 1985 Farm Bill, the United States has placed the European Community countries on notice that this nation plans to fight unfair trading tactics.
NEWS
January 26, 1988 | By Ellen O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
State planning officials are scheduled to meet with New Jersey farmers today in Atlantic City to talk about a proposed master plan for statewide development that farmers fear could reduce the value of agricultural land throughout the Garden State. James Gilbert, chairman of the State Planning Commission, and John Epling, director of the New Jersey Office of State Planning, will take part in the discussion when the 73d annual New Jersey Agricultural Convention begins at 10 a.m. at the Showboat Hotel, Casino & Bowling Center.
NEWS
March 21, 2000 | By Glen Justice, Ken Dilanian and Rena Singer, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
In 1988, the Pennsylvania legislature passed a $100 million farmland preservation program. Three of the farmer-legislators who designed and sponsored the program are among its largest beneficiaries: Rep. John E. Barley (R., Lancaster) has received $1.4 million for two farms whose development rights his family sold through the program. Barley ranks among the top 10 recipients of money in the effort, which has rewarded a total of 1,219 farms. Rep. Arthur D. Hershey (R., Chester)
NEWS
February 2, 2006 | By Nancy Mohr
Next time you're biking through the countryside and see a farmer tilling his field, or you stop to watch horses or cattle grazing, consider the fact that farms are more than just pretty pictures. The complicated farm economy that ranges from the farmer in the field to the equipment supplier, the cattle breeder, mushroom grower, and veterinarian remains second only to tourism as the most productive component of Pennsylvania's economic existence. Historically, farmers have adopted new technology and environmental regulations that bring along neighbor-friendly benefits, even before new neighbors appear on the horizon.
NEWS
July 7, 2005 | By Nancy Mohr
Against a backdrop of uneasy coexistence between farmers and suburbanites, Pennsylvania reached a milestone Tuesday with the passage of ACRE (Agriculture, Communities and Rural Environment). House Bill 1646, which awaits Gov. Rendell's signature, avoids the potential political influences cited by Richard Grossman in his June 23 commentary. Although the measure maintains the overall authority of municipalities, it emphasizes that they may not adopt ordinances exceeding the strictness of state law. It no longer gives an appointed Agricultural Review Board the power to review such law, shifting it instead to the courts.
NEWS
February 19, 2001 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
From where he stands, Roger Kumpel can catch a glimpse of where the grass is greener. Or at least where the land it grows on is worth a lot more. Kumpel's farm on Pemberton Road just east of Route 206 is three-quarters of a mile inside the Pinelands. "Only by a small distance, we were caught in the trap," said Kumpel, 58, whose family tends about 550 acres of grain and vegetable crops. He was among roughly 1,000 farmers whose equity shriveled overnight when their land was restricted from development with the creation of the 1.1 million-acre Pinelands National Reserve in 1979.
NEWS
December 21, 1986 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Chester County swine farmers are taking precautions so that a highly infectious animal virus centered mainly in Lancaster County does not travel across the county line. Cheryl Fairbairn, Chester County agricultural/livestock agent, said the virus, swine pseudorabies, had "absolutely no effect on pork for human consumption. " The disease affects hogs, and they can transmit it to other animals. "Where it becomes an economic disaster is when it gets into breeding swine herds," Fairbairn said.
NEWS
August 22, 1988 | By David Johnston, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five days a week, Henry Licciardello auctions 60 varieties of fruits and vegetables by the truckload at the Vineland Produce Cooperative near here, but now he was trying to sell broccoli rab, saxophone squash and kale at $9 per overflowing bushel basket. The event was yesterday's annual Vineland/Jersey Fresh Festival, which organizers hoped would draw 10,000 people to look over a sampling of the $44 million worth of bruise-free peaches, bright red tomatoes and other produce that will leave here this year for markets in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, New York, Canada and even Florida.
NEWS
May 22, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the predawn fog of an April morning last year, armed federal agents fanned out across darkened Lancaster County pastures in search of contraband. Months of investigation had led to this point. Strong evidence suggested that Rainbow Acres - a small Amish farm just outside Kinzers - served as the hub of a large-scale smuggling operation responsible for shipping hundreds of gallons of illicit product across state lines. After sweeping past dozing cattle and roosters waiting to crow, the agents finally found what they had come for: dozens of coolers filled with unpasteurized milk.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Staff Writer
MARGATE, N.J. - Lobster, challah, hollah! Ten things I learned at the Margate Community Farmers Market: 1. There's lobster in those waters off Atlantic City. Not only are people freaking out over the Caribbean-blue waters at the Jersey Shore this summer (due to drought conditions resulting in less storm water runoff plus a whole lot of phytoplankton), but there are lobsters! In fact, fisherman Patrick Irwin, 42, says he catches the lobsters that many people are eating in New York City and Philadelphia restaurants 12 miles off Atlantic City's Delta Basin on Maryland Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
At farmers' markets this season, alongside the kale and radishes, there are unaccustomed local offerings. Think tulsi bitters for digestion and relaxation, elderberry syrup for immune support, or raspberry leaf tea for pregnant women. Also new to farmers' market shoppers: disclaimers - that the wares are "not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. " This is an offshoot of the farm-to-table movement: Call it the farm-to-medicine-cabinet movement. It's powered by a new generation of farmer-herbalists like Amanda Midkiff, 26, who last year started Locust Light Farm in New Hope, one of a growing number of farm-based apothecaries in the area.
FOOD
June 10, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
A decade ago, Ben Wenk had a new diploma from Pennsylvania State University in agroecology and a decision to make: whether to strike out on his own or return to Adams County and join the family business, Three Springs Fruit Farm. Then, he saw an announcement about a new farmers' market in Society Hill. His family hadn't sold at farmers' markets. "It clicked: That's what I wanted to do. It was the chance to be a vendor here at Headhouse Farmers' Market that convinced me to come back to the farm," he said on a Sunday afternoon in May, manning his stand in the brick-paved arcade at Second and Pine Streets.
FOOD
June 10, 2016
Here is a selection of farmers' markets across the region. For more information, check the two organizations that manage most markets, Farm to City ( www.farmtocity.org ) and the Food Trust ( www.thefoodtrust.org ). Philadelphia Italian Market: S. 9th St. & Washington Ave.; Tue.-Sat. 8 am-4 pm; Sun. to 1 pm. www.italianmarketphilly.org . Reading Terminal Market : 51 N. 12th St.; Mon.-Sat. 8 am-6 pm; Sun. 9 am-5 pm. www.readingterminalmarket.org . Greensgrow Farm Stand : 2501 E. Cumberland St.; Thu. 3-7 pm; Sat. 10 am-2 pm. www.greensgrow.org . Greensgrow West : 4912 Baltimore Ave.; Mon.-Tue.
NEWS
May 17, 2016
Lapped by barely audible waves, the Delaware Bay beaches seem peaceful, but they are the scene of a roaring man-vs.-nature struggle. Oyster farmers are vying with red knots, a threatened bird species, for the shoreline where the migrating avians stop and feed before continuing their epic journey from South America to the Arctic. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently granted the farmers a permit to encroach on the birds' feeding grounds. But the shore is big enough to accommodate both.
FOOD
April 29, 2016
e Pilaf with a pop of pomegranate Middle Eastern food has not traditionally been Philly's strongest suit. But Apricotstone in Northern Liberties has added a welcome taste of some homestyle flavors with a Syrian Armenian flair. Chef-owner Fimy Ishkhanian, an Armenian who grew up in Syria before moving to Canada (and then the Main Line, where she operated a food stand in the Narberth farmers' market) delivers a traditional menu that touches on all her influences. The mujadarah lentil pilaf, for example, goes Armenian style by mixing in bulgur wheat instead of the more common rice.
NEWS
April 20, 2016
Funeral services will be held Tuesday, April 19, for Anthony Russo III, a prominent farmer and businessman, who died in an accident last week on his South Jersey farm. Mr. Russo, 73, of Tabernacle, was killed Saturday, April 16, when he was struck by a tractor on his family's vegetable farm in Burlington County. Police said the death was an accident. Family members said Mr. Russo died doing what he loved, farming - second only to his family. He was a second-generation farmer and owner of Russo's Fruit & Vegetable Farm.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Melanie Burney and Rita Giordano, STAFF WRITERS
Second-generation Burlington County farmer Anthony Russo III made a mark on the business he loved as an advocate and mentor and role model for New Jersey farmers. Russo, 73, a respected longtime farmer and pillar in the rural Tabernacle community, died Thursday afternoon after a tragic accident at his farm. Russo, who owned Russo's Fruit & Vegetable Farm in Tabernacle, was struck by a tractor about 1:50 p.m., New Jersey State Police said Friday. He was rushed by medics to Virtua Memorial Hospital in Mount Holly, where he was pronounced dead a short time later.
NEWS
March 13, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
Among the many things Urban Farmer has become during its brief tenure as the restaurant tenant in the luxe new Logan hotel along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway (replacing the Four Seasons), its role as go-to cocktail destination may be its most successful to date. This will be especially true come the warm weather, when some exciting new outdoor spaces - along the Logan Square sidewalk and on a rooftop bar - open with stellar views over the Parkway. Already, with a long list of house cocktails inside making the most of local spirits, seasonal house-crafted mixers, and heavy chunks of ice sawed from a giant block, the craftsmanship and creativity has impressed.
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