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Farmers Market

NEWS
July 3, 2001 | By Rick Nichols INQUIRER FOOD COLUMNIST
Facing an identity crisis, stiffer supermarket competition, and soft summer sales, the city's beloved Reading Terminal Market was shaken yesterday by an unexpected top-level resignation. Marcy Rogovin, 54, the market's manager for six years, announced that she was calling it quits over "differences in direction" with the market's board. Eighty-five merchants who operate lunch counters and sell fresh meat and produce occupy the century-old market shed at 12th and Arch Streets, once the lower level of the now-defunct Reading Railroad's passenger terminal.
NEWS
November 26, 1987
You would think there would be a holiday mood at the Reading Terminal Market, where the big-eating season means more fresh turkeys for sale and homemade pies and all the rest of the items that make Philadelphia's groaning boards groan. But instead there's pensiveness and, in some quarters, downright depression about the future of the historic ("Since 1893") farmers market. The market's fate has been something of an afterthought in the grand maneuvering for a new city convention center that would be built above and around it, making use of the old Reading Terminal train station that literally sits on top of the market.
NEWS
May 17, 1988 | By CYNTHIA BURTON, Daily News Staff Writer
The city signed its $32 million deal with Reading Co. yesterday to buy the Reading Terminal Market and a series of Reading-owned properties for the proposed convention center. Although the purchase of the Reading Terminal Market - at $7.5 million - is new to the project, city officials denied the added cost would increase the convention center's $468 million cost. The market purchase will be financed privately, so at least for now, it is not included in the project's overall budget.
NEWS
December 18, 1998 | By Andrew Rice, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Delaware County woman serving as a Peace Corps volunteer was found stabbed to death early yesterday near her home in the West African nation of Gabon, the agency reported. Karen M. Phillips, 37, who joined the Peace Corps this year after a career in marketing and fund-raising, had been living in Gabon since April and helping farmers market their produce, the agency said. Her body was found in tall grass near her house. Police in Oyem, Gabon, arrested two men in the slaying, Peace Corps spokesman Brendan Daly said.
NEWS
December 20, 1998 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two men and a woman were arrested yesterday and questioned in the death of Peace Corps volunteer Karen M. Phillips, a native of Delaware County who was slain early Thursday in the West African nation of Gabon. Six people are now in custody in connection with the killing, said Frank Conlon, the organization's director in Gabon. Peace Corps officials had reported the arrests of four people Thursday and Friday, but apparently only three had been apprehended over those two days, Conlon said yesterday by telephone from the capital of Libreville.
NEWS
March 5, 1995 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If a group of farmers and researchers have their way, stalls of vegetables and fruits grown in Chester County will spring up in a West Chester parking lot on Saturday mornings this summer. A "growers market" - as yet unnamed - at the corner of Chestnut and Church Streets two blocks from the Chester County Court House will provide local farmers with a retail market and local residents with farm-fresh produce. But the long-term goal is to help farmers stay in business by keeping them in touch with what consumers want and giving them a bigger share of the profits from the food they grow.
NEWS
September 28, 2003
Close, but oh so far As a former Philadelphian now living in metro Detroit, I love visiting Philadelphia. I love going downtown and visting the historical district. On my most recent trip, I decided to visit the National Constitution Center. I had watched its opening on the Fourth of July on TV, and decided I wanted to see it in person. I must confess it was well worth the $6 admission fee. I hope every school child in Philadelphia has the opportunity to visit the center and learn about the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
NEWS
August 31, 1995 | By Sally Steenland
Locals call them "August people" - the hyper-driven, elbows-out city folk who come up to New England coastal towns for a few weeks of sea and sun. During the year August people work hard - and some of them vacation hard, too. For instance, there's the doctor who drove up from New York in his three- piece suit, sped to the beach, grabbed fishing gear out of his car trunk and plunged right into the surf. "Unbelievable," says a local resident who watched the man ferociously fishing.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2004 | By GLENN WHIPP Los Angeles Daily News
We've had Godzilla vs. Mothra, Freddy take on Jason, and Abbott and Costello meet the Mummy (not to mention the Invisible Man, Frankenstein, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Captain Kidd and Boris Karloff). Following in the footsteps of these movies featuring characters who can no longer hold our interest on their own, but who might be OK if pitted against another fading nemesis, comes "Alien vs. Predator. " Here's the tale of the tape in the latest battle of the withering titans: Series history Predator: When the Predator admires his spaceship trophy case in the Los Angeles-based "Predator 2," we see the skull of an Alien.
FOOD
April 22, 2010
Reader: To my surprise Bobby's Burger Palace has gotten some negative initial reviews, I know its still early for you, but have you eaten there yet? CL: I did make my first visit to Bobby's, the latest in a string of high-concept burger mob scenes. I'll certainly wait before passing final judgment, but with lines down the block, this place has already become a cultural experience that needed investigation. On a mid-Saturday afternoon, there was a line 45 minutes long. It's an appealing concept, all bright colors, bopping music and curvy retro counters.
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