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Farmers Market

FOOD
April 15, 2010
Reader: I was in San Francisco and had dinner at Incanto. The offal dishes were outstanding . . . brains and sweetbreads risotto, tuna heart, kidneys. It was also refreshing to actually see chef Chris Cosentino working the kitchen. I wish there were more places in our area that served unusual dishes such as this. CL: We definitely took a small offal hit when Ansill closed, but it was only brief. David Ansill is back and cooking his marrow out at Ladder 15. Pierre Calmels is stuffing pig's feet with foie gras at Bibou.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
You will hear, on occasion, expats from Trinidad pine for a lost land - for beaches that are gone, and trails paved over, for the slower boat to Tobago (now it's a two-hour trip, not an overnight), and island architecture washed away by a wave of Americanized design. Last week one of them named Clarence Drakes, an architect himself, happened by Calypso, the homey Trinidadian stand in the Chestnut Hill Farmers Market, and he soon fell into a deep, misty-eyed reverie. Ah, but the food, reminded his friend Ayanna Osbourne, who has family ties on the island, that's another matter: No one has torn that page from Trinidad's story.
NEWS
January 10, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the windows of her fourth-floor office at City Hall, redevelopment director Sandy Forosisky can see the front of 99 Cent Dreams, the 38,000-square-foot value store at the center of what has long been a languishing downtown. Starting in March, that view will change. The Landis Avenue dollar store is slated to be converted into a year-round public market, selling local produce, meat, seafood, specialty items, and prepared food. With it, Forosisky is hoping the city's center will change, too. The $5.62 million project, which Forosisky calls a "mini Reading Terminal," is the foundation for a $59 million city makeover.
NEWS
December 1, 2009 | By Joelle Farrell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When he first came to Chester, Daniel King drew crowds to a church parking lot with the sweet, smoky smell of barbecue. Now, the Amish farmer hopes to help fill another void in the impoverished city: fruits and vegetables, deli goods, and homemade pies. King, who operated Dan's Barbecue out of a trailer at Ninth and Kerlin Streets for the last four years, plans to open an indoor farmers market this week downtown. Along with his barbecued chicken and ribs, he said, the market will feature deli meats, freshly prepared hot meals, homemade baked goods, and produce, much of it from small farms in Lancaster County.
FOOD
May 21, 2009
Philadelphia (FTC=Farm to City; FT=The Food Trust; BCFA=Bucks County Foodshed Alliance, buckscountyfoodshedalliance.org))   Center City and South Philadelphia City Hall (FTC), northwest corner of City Hall Plaza, Wed. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fitler Square (FT), 23d and Pine Streets, Sat. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. The Fountain (FTC), East Passyunk Avenue at 11th and Tasker Streets, Wed. 3-7 p.m. Headhouse (FT), Second and Lombard Streets, Sat.-Sun., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. through December.
FOOD
May 21, 2009 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Want a side dish of current events to go with that fresh asparagus or no-hormones milk in the old-fashioned glass jug? You can get all that at one of the region's many farmers markets. For those markets that do business only in warmer weather, this season's staggered openings began in early May and will continue through the summer months. In 2009, the markets are an unusual mix of greens - organic produce and wilted economic factors that are causing people to recalculate their budgets and their lifestyles.
NEWS
February 19, 2009 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If all goes as planned, a farmers market will sprout in the spring on a parking lot in Bryn Mawr. The Lower Merion Board of Commissioners approved a licensing agreement last night with Farm to City, a small business that will operate the Saturday-only market. The 12-1 vote came despite opposition from one local management company. Kimco Realty, manager of the Ardmore Farmers Market in Suburban Square, Ardmore, said it "significantly contributed to the tax base, unlike the proposed vendor.
NEWS
December 5, 2008 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The apron on the west side of City Hall, which hosts a farmers market in spring and summer, and occasional political demonstrations year-round, is for the first time the site of a German Christmas village. Modeled on the traditional Christkindlmarkt in Nuremberg, the concept harks back to the 15th century, said organizer Thomas Bauer of German American Marketing Inc. Throughout Europe, and in many American cities, where an "e" is added into the name, Christkindlmarkets have become must-do activities at this time of year.
NEWS
May 22, 2008 | By Helen I. Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
At the Mill at Anselma in Chester Springs, a 16-foot waterwheel gently splashed visitors while generating enough power to grind fresh-off-the-mill, stone-ground cornmeal and wheat flour. Last Saturday, the historic grain mill opened its doors for a milling demonstration, a preview of its weekly farmers market and the introduction of organic grains milled on site. The organic cornmeal and wheat flour can be used to make bread, polenta, pizza dough, pie crusts and pancakes. Two-pound bags of the organic goods sell for $6 in the mill's gift shop, while nonorganic versions were selling for $4. The mill decided to offer organic grains because people kept asking for them, explained Heather Reiffer, executive director at the mill.
FOOD
May 15, 2008 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Local crops and farmers markets got an early start this year. And judging from the relative bounty already evident at the growing number of markets, it is going to be a very good year. Besides opening earlier, markets have attracted more growers and vendors. So far, the variety of crops and products exceeds what we're used to at this point in the season. The mild winter and good weather conditions get some of the credit. The rest goes to smart farmers who took note of the 15 percent increase in farm-market business here last year and planned ahead, "forcing" some crops in greenhouses and "high tunnels" (tented crop rows in the field)
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