CollectionsFarmhouse
IN THE NEWS

Farmhouse

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | By Ward Allebach, Special to The Inquirer
Montgomery Township supervisors once jokingly referred to Thomas O. Witthauer's restoration of the Lower State Road farmhouse as "the waiver property. " The township Zoning Hearing Board Tuesday night ruled that Witthauer - who has been before the board at least nine times - deserved some more help. Voting 3-0, the board decided to amend a ruling from last spring. The change would allow Witthauer to sublet five rooms of the 22-room, three-story building as one-person offices for a three-year period.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The modest farmhouse of a peace-loving Quaker family figured in one of the great battles of the American Revolution. That farmhouse will reopen this weekend after a three-year restoration project. Ceremonies marking the reopening of the Gideon Gilpin House are scheduled for tomorrow and Saturday, said Gayle Bartell, education coordinator for Brandywine Battlefield Park in Chadds Ford. The Gilpin House, popularly called Lafayette's Quarters, was built in 1745. The young Marquis de Lafayette, an aide to Gen. George Washington, is believed to have stayed at the house on the night before the Battle of the Brandywine, fought on Sept.
REAL_ESTATE
September 17, 2012 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
This tale, about Diane and Rick Kiewel of Marple Township, is as much about their very old house as it is about two divorcees starting over and the importance of la famiglia . This house has allowed Diane to be even closer to her tight-knit Italian family, and it has let her help her daughter with her growing family. The former tenant farmhouse, part of which was built in 1796, also has taught Rick a thing or two about himself. Our story starts in December 1995. Rick, currently director of finance for Mellon Certified Restoration in Yeadon, was not quite divorced, but was ready for a new relationship.
REAL_ESTATE
March 9, 2014 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Three days a week, dentist Peter Wolf heads to his Center City office from his centuries-old farmhouse in Media. There, he drills holes, builds bridges, and otherwise tends to people's oral hygiene. The four other days, he is often in his neat and tidy woodworker's workshop. It is there that Peter, 65, a self-taught furniture maker, creates the remarkable pieces - a Pennsylvania tall clock, wall-to-wall cabinets, and more - that fill the home he shares with wife Mary Anne, 60. In the couple's bedroom, for instance, is a suite of furniture modeled on one by Thos.
NEWS
March 8, 1989 | By Stephen Keating, Special to The Inquirer
The Lumberton Township Planning Board last week denied a revised site plan for a proposed Route 38 strip center, leaving uncertain the fate of the former Jones farmhouse on the site. Heated discussions on whether the 180-year-old farmhouse should be torn down to accommodate the strip center, as developer Maple Grove Associates wants, or restored, as the Lumberton Historical Commission proposes, have dominated the last four meetings of the Planning Board. The issue shows no signs of being resolved.
NEWS
June 4, 1996 | By Pam Louwagie, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The tattered frame house of Eagleton Farms near the northernmost point in the township is in danger of losing its nearly two-century-old existence. That is, unless the local historical commission has its way. Developers, who plan to build 78 houses on the 79-acre tract just northwest of the intersection of Stoopville and Eagle Roads, say it would be too expensive to save the old farmhouse. The house, which sits at almost the lowest point of the tract, is the perfect place for the retention basin required by the township, said William J. Carlin, attorney for the Pulte Home Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The front door of Joan and Victor Johnson's Center City penthouse is no ordinary portal. This circa-1810 paneled-wood masterpiece, sturdy, beautiful, and evocative of the past, was seized like pirate's booty from a dealer at the Philadelphia Antiques Show several years ago - just after they had purchased another door. "The timing wasn't great," says Joan, "but the find was. " A legendary collector and volunteer for the show that begins Friday night with a preview party at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Joan knew that its rugged charm would set the stage for what they were creating beyond the threshold: a farmhouse in the heart of the city.
NEWS
January 22, 1989 | By Stephen Keating, Special to The Inquirer
The home where Al Jones was raised and spent 33 years is the last farmhouse on Route 38 from Camden to Route 206. And soon, it too may be gone. "Once you tear these houses down, that's it," said Doris Priest, referring to the 180-year-old Lumberton farmhouse slated for destruction. The subject is slated when the township Planning Board meets on Feb. 2. On one side are the developers, Maple Grove Associates, which bought the 110-acre farm a year ago and which wants to build a shopping center on the front 11 acres where the former Jones farmhouse now sits.
NEWS
March 6, 1988 | By Melinda Deanna Anderson, Special to The Inquirer Staff writer Curtis Rist contributed to this article
Over 195 years, the Benjamin Jacobs House on Ship Road has been home to a judge, to farm families and to boarding students from the Church Farm School, which used the house as a dormitory. The house would take on still another identity under plans by Rouse & Associates, which has proposed restoring the structure for use as project headquarters during the development of 1,325 acres adjacent to the Church Farm School. Rouse, which has an agreement to buy the acreage from Church Farm, presented restoration plans for the Jacobs house on Monday during a conditional-use hearing by the West Whiteland Board of Supervisors.
NEWS
October 26, 2003 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Fascinating murals painted by Charles Demuth and a group of friends in a Lancaster County farmhouse in 1930 are the subject of the autumn exhibit at the Demuth Museum in Lancaster. The display is based on a project that produced a roomful of murals and that, here at the museum, at first glance look like the real thing. This is because, as a life-size photo re-creation, they are meticulously realistic and true to the originals, which are in the private setting of a historic house and cannot be moved.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
July 17, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
A short trek Doug and Kelly Hager and chef Jeremy Nolen from South Street's Brauhaus Schmitz have made the three-block trek from Germany to America with Whetstone Tavern , at the corner of Fifth and Bainbridge Streets. "Being on South Street for six years, we know what the neighborhood likes," Hager said. Menu of updated classics has most entrées priced in the $20s. Whetstone's 15-beer tap selection is augmented by Marnie Old's 60-bottle wine list, of which 20 are served by the glass.
REAL_ESTATE
March 8, 2015 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
In 1991, Kristin and Steve Stoughton were 24 and engaged to be married. Knowing that they wanted to buy an older house, Steve's employer made a bold suggestion. The boss, a residential developer, was planning to build several houses on a tract in Fort Washington. Would Steve and his fiancee be interested in buying a battered farmhouse and barn on the site? Sure would. The barn and the small three-story dwelling dated to the late 1840s. Two-story additions were added in the 1920s and 1940s.
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Bob Berry's house on the banks of the Pickering Creek near Phoenixville has evolved, to say the least. Born as a 19th-century farmhouse, it got its first makeover in the 1940s when famed architect Oskar Stonerov transformed it into an International-style haven for his family, which eventually included four children, and his wife, Elizabeth, who started a popular cooperative preschool there. Then, when Bob Berry bought the structure in 2005, his brother-in-law and architect John Kohlhaus remade it to fit 21st century needs.
REAL_ESTATE
July 27, 2014 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Chester County contractor Jeff Morrison looked at the forgettable facade of Jennifer and Michael Mankowski's home, a stuccoed, farmhouse-style exterior. But what he actually saw was a circa-1900 house begging to emerge. His partner, designer Courtney Kish, saw it, too. They envisioned using different textures (stone, cedar shake, faux-wood siding, and some stucco) to delineate the house's existing separate sections - a style that defined the classic Chester County farmhouse look.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The front door of Joan and Victor Johnson's Center City penthouse is no ordinary portal. This circa-1810 paneled-wood masterpiece, sturdy, beautiful, and evocative of the past, was seized like pirate's booty from a dealer at the Philadelphia Antiques Show several years ago - just after they had purchased another door. "The timing wasn't great," says Joan, "but the find was. " A legendary collector and volunteer for the show that begins Friday night with a preview party at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Joan knew that its rugged charm would set the stage for what they were creating beyond the threshold: a farmhouse in the heart of the city.
REAL_ESTATE
March 9, 2014 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Three days a week, dentist Peter Wolf heads to his Center City office from his centuries-old farmhouse in Media. There, he drills holes, builds bridges, and otherwise tends to people's oral hygiene. The four other days, he is often in his neat and tidy woodworker's workshop. It is there that Peter, 65, a self-taught furniture maker, creates the remarkable pieces - a Pennsylvania tall clock, wall-to-wall cabinets, and more - that fill the home he shares with wife Mary Anne, 60. In the couple's bedroom, for instance, is a suite of furniture modeled on one by Thos.
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Janet Carlson Giardina handed a large flower pot to Angie Furno, pointed her toward some mums, and crossed once again through the Medford farmhouse she is turning into an education center about James Still, the "black doctor of the Pines. " On Sunday, the Medford Historical Society will inaugurate the center at 211 Church Rd., and on Friday volunteers were planting fence posts, mulching a children's garden, hanging drapes, and setting up chairs for opening day. Still, Carlson was not prepared for the sight of two contractors jacking a pair of stately white columns into place under the front-door eaves.
FOOD
December 27, 2012
You think you know gouda? You probably don't know what gouda can be unless you've tasted Wilde Weide, a "farmhouse" cheese handmade by Jan and Roos van Schie on their little island in South Holland in the Netherlands. Unlike even the best mass-produced goudas, which can become waxy and butterscotchy with age, there is a remarkably subtle complexity to Wilde Weide, but also a fresh brightness evident from the organic raw milk of Montbeliarde and red Friesian cows. This two-year-old firm cheese melts in slo-mo on the tongue, its texture crumbling like a fine sand of flavor crystals, turning to creaminess that evokes nuts and oaked whiskey, then an herbal brightness that pays homage to the name: wilde weide is Dutch for "wild meadow.
REAL_ESTATE
November 18, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
For years, Sharon Carnall would admire the old farmhouse as she did her errands around the Medford-Hainesport area. And she thought it was a fine old place - but one that could become even finer. So when her husband Richard, 76, started talking about moving from their large home in Medford to a seniors community, Sharon, 63, had a far different plan. She decided to push for the old farmhouse that she had loved from afar, and that was, conveniently, on the market. "I went with the Realtor to look at it twice without Dick, and then I hatched my perfect plan.
REAL_ESTATE
September 17, 2012 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
This tale, about Diane and Rick Kiewel of Marple Township, is as much about their very old house as it is about two divorcees starting over and the importance of la famiglia . This house has allowed Diane to be even closer to her tight-knit Italian family, and it has let her help her daughter with her growing family. The former tenant farmhouse, part of which was built in 1796, also has taught Rick a thing or two about himself. Our story starts in December 1995. Rick, currently director of finance for Mellon Certified Restoration in Yeadon, was not quite divorced, but was ready for a new relationship.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|