CollectionsFarmhouse
IN THE NEWS

Farmhouse

NEWS
October 19, 1989 | By J.F. Casale, Special to The Inquirer
The New Britain Township Planning Commission has recommended approval of plans to subdivide the Adams tract, pending a decision by the zoning board on whether zoning regulations permit three single-family dwellings on the 18.3- acre site. The tract is zoned agricultural-recreational, a designation that requires a minimum lot-size of five acres per house. Some of the land is not considered buildable, officials said. According to Robert Larason, the township engineer, fewer than 2 1/2 single-family dwellings could be placed on the tract, situated off Ferry Road near Old Limekiln Pike.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city's Zoning Board of Adjustment has approved continued operation of a center for alcoholics and drug addicts in Pennypack Park. Detailing the decision, a board staff member said Tuesday that the board set a number of conditions on its grant. Conditions include creation of a community advisory board to open lines of communication between neighbors and the nonprofit, self-help group, 369 Inc., which uses an 18th-century farmhouse at 8600 Krewstown Rd. as its headquarters.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | By Bill Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
It used to be a vacant, dilapidated farmhouse, surrounded by weeds and debris. Now, it's a neatly kept meeting place, thanks in large part to the $20,000 spent by volunteers on new plumbing, new wiring and other repairs. The volunteers provide an around-the-clock caretaker for the farmhouse, at 8600 Krewstown Rd. in Pennypack Park. They razed an unsightly barn next door. They sell Christmas trees and stage picnics and fund-raising events on the site. Quite a turnabout. The story has all of the makings of a grass-roots success story, save one - the neighbors don't want the volunteers near the 18- century farmhouse.
NEWS
May 27, 1987 | By Nancy Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
The fading wooden trim and shutters of the brick farmhouse at Cherry Hill's Barclay Farmstead will get a fresh coat of paint, and other improvements to the township-owned property will soon begin with money from a recently established trust fund. This month, the township received a check for $4,471 - the first interest payment on a $100,000 trust fund established in the will of former farmstead owner Helen C. Barclay. Barclay, who died in August at the age of 71, set aside money to help preserve the 19th-century farmhouse, forge barn and springhouse upon her death.
NEWS
August 23, 1987 | By Kery Murakami, Inquirer Staff Writer (The Associated Press contributed to this article.)
State police yesterday arrested a Western Pennsylvania couple and charged them with involuntary manslaughter after their 1-year-old son and 2-year-old daughter died when they were left inside a car parked in the sun near a farmhouse for much of the day Friday. The couple, John and Lisa Shields of Indiana, also charged with endangering the welfare of their children, were being held in Indiana County Jail after failing to make $50,000 and $15,000 bond respectively, police said. "It sounds as though they (the children)
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | By Georgia S. Ashby, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When a March windstorm blew through a rustic barn in Uwchlan Township, it not only knocked down one of the barn's old stone walls, but it also touched off a skirmish between the barn's owner and officials who had tried to preserve the building. There wasn't much point in saving the rest of the barn, according to two township supervisors who visited the site, which is part of a local development called Weaver's Pond. But on Monday they did threaten to fine the developer of Weaver's Pond $35,000, saying he had allowed the accident to happen.
NEWS
February 1, 2003 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Elizabeth D. Medinger, 93, partners with her husband in marriage, business and unique home design, died Tuesday of complications associated with diabetes at Artman Lutheran Home in Ambler. She had been a longtime resident of the city's Wyndmoor section, where she and her husband lived in an authentic re-creation they had built of an 18th-century Pennsylvania farmhouse. The house was authentic right down to the handmade nails. Born and raised in Reading, Mrs. Medinger taught elementary school there for a time after earning a teaching certificate from Kutztown Normal School.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | By Elisabeth Ryan Sullivan, Special to The Inquirer
For more than eight years, a dedicated band of volunteers from Mount Laurel's PAWS Farm has been devoting thousands of hours of work in an effort to preserve a crumbling farmhouse and create a nature and wildlife center among the housing developments of suburbia. This year, their efforts resulted in an invitation to the White House, where the founders and volunteer workers of PAWS Farm, a sanctuary for sick and orphaned animals, last week received a Take Pride in America plaque.
FOOD
November 13, 2008
Cheese of the Month After years of vacations in Vermont, I thought I knew good cheddar. But the emergence of traditional farmhouse versions from England (where cheddar, after all, was born) has changed my perception of the genre. The American and British renditions are so unalike, they're practically different cheeses. You'll know what I mean when you taste Mrs. Quicke's, a traditional-style Brit from Devon. Whereas most Americans become creamy and sharp as they age, the British versions become intensely earthy.
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Janet Carlson Giardina handed a large flower pot to Angie Furno, pointed her toward some mums, and crossed once again through the Medford farmhouse she is turning into an education center about James Still, the "black doctor of the Pines. " On Sunday, the Medford Historical Society will inaugurate the center at 211 Church Rd., and on Friday volunteers were planting fence posts, mulching a children's garden, hanging drapes, and setting up chairs for opening day. Still, Carlson was not prepared for the sight of two contractors jacking a pair of stately white columns into place under the front-door eaves.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|