CollectionsFarmhouse
IN THE NEWS

Farmhouse

NEWS
May 29, 2006 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ray Connolly started to choke up when he learned that he would receive a Purple Heart medal, more than six decades after being wounded in World War II. "I was a Philadelphia firefighter for 27 years and never choked up. That's very, very rare for me," the 84-year-old Burlington County man said last week. "But nothing hit me as much as this did. All I could say is, 'Sir, I thank you very, very much.' " Sixty-two years ago, then-Army Pfc. Connolly was wounded by flying shrapnel in a German farmhouse during the waning days of World War II. A German plane had been shot down, crashed and exploded near the house, blowing out windows and sending a large piece of glass into his forearm.
NEWS
March 10, 2005 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just when it seemed that Skippack's historic Hunsicker Farmhouse might end up a memory, a local district court judge has stepped in to save it. Albert Augustine, a lover of old houses, has agreed to pay $25,000 for the 171-year-old farmhouse. He estimates that he will spend $300,000 to refurbish it for residential use. The purchase means that the structure, which stood vacant for the last three years next to land being developed for townhouses, wins permanent reprieve from the wrecker's ball.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Sea Inside begins with the sound of breathing: the soft, steady thrum of life. And it is one man's life - and his desire to end it - that is at the heart of this moving, hot-button-issue drama. Based on the real story of Ramon Sampedro, a Spanish sea merchant and poet who spent 30 years fighting the church and the state for the right to die, The Sea Inside transcends its melodramatic, movie-of-the-week elements thanks to a deft comic touch and the utterly convincing, charismatic performance of its star, Javier Bardem.
NEWS
November 21, 2004 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Preservation efforts in the 1970s saved Washington Township's Old Stone House, one of the municipality's oldest homes. Now residents hope that similar efforts will result in the reopening of the Creese-Quay farmhouse, long closed to the public. The three-story white clapboard house was built in 1825 by John Turner of Turnersville. This section of the town was named after Turner, a Methodist minister, carpenter and prominent landowner, said Bob Gruber, the township's chief park ranger, who is leading restoration efforts.
NEWS
September 5, 2004 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Inspired by the natural world that surrounded his studio in the woods, Wharton Esherick transformed wood into fluid sculpture and shapely furniture that merged utility with beauty. Over the years, his studio - a building that defies conventional architecture - became a showcase for his art, from the spiral staircase that was displayed at the 1939-40 World's Fair in New York to his first red oak desk, right down to the carved latches on the doors. When Esherick, known as the dean of American craftsmen, died in 1970, he left this legacy.
NEWS
August 18, 2004 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The bulldozers could arrive any minute now for the 1771 Robeson House, a rambling, stone, colonial-era homestead in Gladwyne that may be the latest victim of the Main Line housing boom. When property owner Steven B. Wolfson, a developer of Wal-Mart stores, announced he would demolish the ivy-clad house to build what locals assume will be another McMansion, Lower Merion Township officials took the strongest action they could: They ordered a 90-day "cooling-off" period. That period ended yesterday, prompting 15 supporters to picket in the driveway, waving signs such as "233 years.
NEWS
May 30, 2004 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Pinelands Preservation Alliance has chosen a new home as close to nature as modern civilization will allow. The group of six full-time employees, four part-time employees, and several volunteers settled into its new digs at the Bishop Farmstead in Vincentown about three weeks ago. The farmstead, on the edge of the Pinelands, dates to 1753, when John and Rebecca Bishop built a 2 1/2-story Georgian brick farmhouse on 12 acres on what is...
NEWS
March 30, 2004 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A farmhouse from the 1800s that stands in the path of development in Skippack Township is being scoured by researchers for clues to its past. What they find will determine whether the Hunsicker Farmhouse on Heckler Road near Mount Airy Road takes its place among the township's historic treasures. The sprawling, white building built in the 1830s was occupied by three generations of Hunsickers, a family who helped establish the second Mennonite colony in America. The farmhouse sits on 25 acres earmarked by TH Properties of Harleysville for a community of 149 townhouses, trails and access roads.
NEWS
October 26, 2003 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Fascinating murals painted by Charles Demuth and a group of friends in a Lancaster County farmhouse in 1930 are the subject of the autumn exhibit at the Demuth Museum in Lancaster. The display is based on a project that produced a roomful of murals and that, here at the museum, at first glance look like the real thing. This is because, as a life-size photo re-creation, they are meticulously realistic and true to the originals, which are in the private setting of a historic house and cannot be moved.
NEWS
August 17, 2003 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Nancy and Gordon Eck began searching for a home, they could hardly have imagined it would turn into a 20-year odyssey. Nor could they know that the 18th century farmhouse they eventually bought would be a $1 million labor of love by the time they turned it into a bed-and-breakfast. Along the way, the Ecks encountered hundreds of screeching bats inside the house, a white goose trapped in the chimney, and a feisty rooster claiming the tree next to the upstairs bedroom as his morning perch.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|