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Farmhouse

NEWS
November 24, 2002 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Photographs of Nancy Mohr's five children fill every nook and cranny of her home. Dining-room chairs crafted by her grandfather, a Lancaster cabinetmaker, have seated many a family gathering. Family and an appreciation for the bygone days when farmhouses instead of subdivisions dotted the landscape are uppermost for Mohr, executive director of the Chester County 2020 Trust. She has just written The Farmhouse: Classic Homesteads of North America. The book is both a personal account of her own love affair with farms and a description of classic farms throughout the United States and Canada.
NEWS
September 13, 2002 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Federal-style farmhouse that Isaac Leeds built for his family 201 years ago, in a hamlet in Burlington County, once nestled within 100 acres of cow pastures and cornfields. The rural serenity continued after its second owner, the Michelfelder family, moved into the plain, two-story clapboard structure and took over the farm. But change arrived 15 years ago, after a developer purchased the tract, one of a cluster of farmsteads that grew into Evesham Township, now the county's largest community.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2002 | By STEVE GARY For the Daily News
His given name is Leonard Louis Lasko, but for more than 36 years he has been known around the world simply as Mr. 3L. If you collect cigar boxes and package labels, posters, or any other types of paper Americana, you probably have made his acquaintance. If you haven't, then today and tomorrow offer a prime opportunity to do so, as Mr. 3L is emptying his two-story collector's center, in Soudersburg, just beyond Paradise, to make way for a new tenant. Barr/Davis Auctioneers, of nearby Gap, is conducting this sale.
LIVING
July 26, 2002 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It looked like the good life. The apartment in the tony San Francisco neighborhood, the well-paid jobs in advertising. But for Cathleen Miller and her husband, Kerby Macrae, it had all begun to seem hollow. She really wanted to write and to teach. He wanted to work with his hands. And that's how Miller, 46, and Macrae, 43, ended up in the tiny central Pennsylvania village of Zion, renovating a beat-up 100-year-old farmhouse while she slogged through graduate school at Pennsylvania State University and he worked in a furniture factory.
NEWS
October 21, 2001 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Considering the looming wrecking ball, acute financial troubles, and the fear that their gem of a historical space might never get recognized, members of the Historical Society didn't have it easy. But earlier this month, their decade of work paid off, and the Peter Mott House, a 156-year-old farmhouse that was a station on the Underground Railroad, was dedicated as a museum. "Many times, I thought we weren't going to be able to save it. So many doors were banged in our face," said Clarence Still, a Lawnside historian and lifelong resident of the borough, which bills itself as the only historically African American borough in the northern United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In the benighted years when Alfred Hitchcock was still regarded as nothing more than a slick commercial director in this country, his genius was revered in France. And his influence plainly lives on in films such as Dominik Moll's With a Friend Like Harry. Although Moll's movie teems with references to Strangers on a Train, The Trouble With Harry, and Psycho, it is no pale imitation of the master in the Brian De Palma manner. With a Friend Like Harry is an homage, with its own voice and dark-hued humor.
NEWS
March 1, 2001 | By Michelle Jeffery INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Orleans Construction Corp. has agreed to postpone demolition of a 19th-century home at Mann and Welsh Roads while it considers a resident's offer to buy the house. The house was scheduled to be torn down yesterday to make way for 24 upscale houses on 39 acres. A new demolition date has not been set. Edwin Thompson, who lives on Mann Road less than 200 yards from the proposed development, asked Orleans to set a price for the house and part of the land around it at an informal meeting Monday between Orleans, township officials, and residents working to preserve the home.
NEWS
February 6, 2001 | By Michelle Jeffery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The efforts of some local residents may not be enough to save a 19th-century home at Mann and Welsh Roads from being bulldozed at the end of this month. A demolition permit has been signed for the former home of farmer Josiah Mann. The structure is scheduled to be razed to make room for 24 luxury homes on 40 acres. In a letter to the Horsham Preservation and Historical Association, Bensalem-based Orleans Construction Corp. said that the group could photograph, document and salvage parts of the house until Feb. 21, when the Horsham Fire Department is scheduled use the house for practice drills.
NEWS
February 5, 2001 | By Margie Fishman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tracy Cass barely knew David Powell. But she knew the half-bushels of peaches and apples stacked next to his old red barn on Tomlinson Road. As a child, Cass recalled, she visited Powell's orchard with her family, and the fruit tasted natural and special. After Powell died in September 1999 at age 92, his stucco-covered stone farmhouse - which local restoration buffs date to the pre-Revolutionary War era - was destined for mothballs. The white paint was peeling, the pine floors were rotting, and the basement resembled a scene from a horror flick, Cass, now 40, recalled.
NEWS
November 14, 2000 | By Chani Katzen, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A coalition of buyers, including Delaware County and the long-homeless county historical society, have agreed to purchase the township's last remaining farm and preserve its rolling meadows and 18th-century farmhouse. The $2.4 million agreement of sale for the 34 acres of Greenbank Farm was brokered by its neighbor, the Natural Lands Trust conservation group. The trust also contributed to the purchase. Marple Township will pay the largest amount of the price, $1 million, in its biggest land purchase since the 1960s.
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