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Fashion Industry

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NEWS
August 22, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HENRY MAE Robinson Mitchell's name should have been in Webster's dictionary next to the word "survivor. " She was snatched from the brink of death so many times that she actually gave that word a new definition. Even in her final days at a Glenside nursing home, Henry - yes, that was her real name - was determined to overcome a stroke and live to see her 87th birthday on Aug. 6. She made it, surrounded by friends and well-wishers. Her secret was faith and guts. Henry Mitchell, whose fashion sense led her to employment in Philadelphia's fashion industry, often being a pathfinder for other African-Americans, died Aug. 13. She was a longtime resident of West Oak Lane.
NEWS
January 28, 1992 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shoppers may not notice a difference now that R.H. Macy & Co. Inc., one of the best-known retailers in the world, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection from creditors. But the fashion world is shaking in its fur-lined boots. The Macy bankruptcy may prove to be the most serious blow yet to a clothing industry already reeling from shrinking sales and the demise or reorganization of such well-known names in retailing as Saks, Bloomingdale's and B. Altman's. Up and down the Seventh Avenue-based garment district yesterday, the talk was of the fallout likely to result from the Macy bankruptcy.
NEWS
October 2, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / TOM GRALISH
Fashion may be all about fun and frivolity, but it's also a highly competitive business. And that's what inspired 200 fashion-design students at Drexel University to squeeze into a single small room on the Philadelphia campus yesterday. They were there to get some career advice from a master of the form, veteran designer Bill Blass. Blass, who is known for his personal involvement in designing and selling his clothes, gave them tips on how to break into the fashion industry.
NEWS
October 4, 1988 | BY GERRI H. WALKER
Philadelphia is the third largest garment manufacturing center in the United States. The making of apparal s our city's largest industry. It employs 25,000 people in 350 businesses, which generate annual sales of over one billion dollars. In comparison, Philadelphia's second largest industry, printing, employs little more than two-thirds as many people - 17,000. Philadelphia is home to six schools of clothing design and has trade schools to teach garment industry skills. As a consequence, there is a large pool of labor skilled in the garment industry trades in Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 24, 1997
Do glamor ads of rail-thin, glassy-eyed, skanky-looking models in $500 tube tops make anyone want to shoot up heroin? That's what you have to ask now that President Clinton has criticized the use of fashion models who look like they've crawled out a drug den. "The glorification of heroin is not creative, it's destructive," Clinton said in a speech to 35 mayors meeting to discuss fighting drugs, probably more interested in finding money to...
NEWS
March 30, 1988 | By NINA TOTENBERG, Special to the Daily News
For many American women, the big news a couple of weeks ago was made not in the Middle East or the Super Tuesday primaries but in our own home towns, where the fashion industry is taking a major bath on the miniskirt. Many professional women simply refuse to buy the mini, so retail clothing sales are the worst since the 1982 recession. In short, the mini is a fashion disaster, and many designers are hurriedly lengthening hemlines for the fall. Every moment of industry misery is richly deserved by the fashion designers, retail clothiers and newspaper and magazine poltroons who propagate and perpetuate this preposterous creation.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - It's been a bit hard to tell the difference between men's and women's runway presentations at the fall 2013 fashion shows. Nautica's Black Sail collection had its male models in banana-yellow skinny pants rolled at the ankles. Coats with oversize fur collars featured a slight A-line flare. Designer Patrik Ervell's presentation last Sunday included an iridescent, emerald-green cape with a wraparound, cowl-neck collar. Even Michael Kors - whose manly clothes are typically classic American with a dose of Old World sophistication - dressed a model Wednesday in a fuzzy, short-sleeve sweater and skinny slacks, while another wore a bright-orange, belted trench.
LIVING
October 8, 1996 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
They flaunt the ominous signs of drug addiction: vacant stares, dirty disheveled hair, unkempt clothes and a frame so gaunt, bone juts through flesh. These young people may look like strung-out junkies, but they're actually highly paid models adopting the wasted look and drooping posture of addicts. They stare out defiantly from glossy magazine spreads and Calvin Klein fragrance ads. They stagger down the catwalk for Gianni Versace, Gucci and Donna Karan. The look has been dubbed "heroin chic," and to designers, photographers, makeup artists and their assorted accomplices in commerce, it's just another cutting-edge fashion statement, the latest.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Dresses the World, the annual city-sponsored showcase of the local fashion industry that has been scaled back several times and faced possible cancellation earlier this year, will undergo yet another change. Instead of participation's being open to anyone willing to pay for the booth space, designers for this year's exhibition will be selected by a juried panel, said project director Lynn Folkman. If the panel deems the work up to standard, then the designer must pay $400 for space at the Port of History Museum, where the exhibition was moved last year after its budget was slashed by the city.
NEWS
March 15, 1988
America's fashion moguls have finally acknowledged that their attempts to resurrect the miniskirt have fallen as flat as yesterday's souffle. "People aren't dictated to anymore," sniffed one major designer. "Some women got very belligerent. " Small wonder when they were told to clean out the closets just because Seventh Avenue decreed the year of the knee. Short-short may be fine for a skinny 22-year-old on a Saturday night. But most women have neither the shape nor the inclination to follow such fashion commands.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
All during this awfully cold winter, I took comfort in infinity scarves. And although the winds are warming, I want to hold on to my stylish security blanket. Judging from the explosion of lightweight wraps on this spring's fashion scene - bandeau and shawl, solid and print, tasseled and zippered - I'm not alone. "You just wrap yourself in them over and over and over again," said Ken Downing, Neiman Marcus' famed fashion director, as he exited a Drexel University lunch in his honor Friday afternoon.
NEWS
August 22, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HENRY MAE Robinson Mitchell's name should have been in Webster's dictionary next to the word "survivor. " She was snatched from the brink of death so many times that she actually gave that word a new definition. Even in her final days at a Glenside nursing home, Henry - yes, that was her real name - was determined to overcome a stroke and live to see her 87th birthday on Aug. 6. She made it, surrounded by friends and well-wishers. Her secret was faith and guts. Henry Mitchell, whose fashion sense led her to employment in Philadelphia's fashion industry, often being a pathfinder for other African-Americans, died Aug. 13. She was a longtime resident of West Oak Lane.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - It's been a bit hard to tell the difference between men's and women's runway presentations at the fall 2013 fashion shows. Nautica's Black Sail collection had its male models in banana-yellow skinny pants rolled at the ankles. Coats with oversize fur collars featured a slight A-line flare. Designer Patrik Ervell's presentation last Sunday included an iridescent, emerald-green cape with a wraparound, cowl-neck collar. Even Michael Kors - whose manly clothes are typically classic American with a dose of Old World sophistication - dressed a model Wednesday in a fuzzy, short-sleeve sweater and skinny slacks, while another wore a bright-orange, belted trench.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2012 | By Vikki Ortiz Healy, Chicago Tribune
CHICAGO - Sophia Saverese attended her first day of kindergarten last week wearing a delicate floral print dress, ballet flats, and a bow in her hair, no thanks to the displays at the mall promoting glittery miniskirts, wedge sandals, and one-shouldered tank tops in kiddie sizes. "She did see the other stuff, and she picked it out and said she liked it," said Nicole Saverese, the Glen Ellyn, Ill., mother of three who, with her mother-in-law's help, steered Sophia away from the adult styles during a recent shopping trip.
NEWS
October 6, 2010 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - Specialty-store owners have a lot to think about when they shop to stock. How many size 2's, 8's, or 16's should they buy? How do they blend funky colors with fledgling designers, while maintaining the store's personality? And when do they buy what may, or may not, be the next fashion craze? (Think skinny cargos or Silly Bandz. Who'd a thunk it?) Buyers for eco-friendly boutiques have to do all that. But they're also looking for pieces with a low carbon footprint, a win-some-lose-some challenge that demands consideration of a constantly evolving manufacturing landscape.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2010 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
A few weeks ago I was at Saks Fifth Avenue in Bala Cynwyd gathering clothes for a spring photo shoot when I spotted a pink clutch with a skull clasp. The eyes were gleaming amethysts. I had to have the bag, by British designer Alexander McQueen. Marc Beeler, couture salesman at Saks, echoed my thoughts before I could even form the words. It would be perfect for the shoot. "Yes, dear. Take it!" Beeler said, as he unlocked the case and gently slid the clutch into a protective black bag. "It's hot. " What McQueen created during his fashion career wasn't just hot; it was scalding.
NEWS
September 10, 2009 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
The economic downturn proved that the fashion-obsessed won't necessarily buy hot clothes just because they're in the stores. So tonight, to help us feel better about making often-thought-of-as-frivolous purchases, Vogue editor Anna Wintour will host Fashion's Night Out, a worldwide party - participants will be shopping in the United States, France, Italy, Taiwan, and Russia - to get recession-weary shoppers back in the stores. In the Philadelphia region, the King of Prussia mall - the only mall in the world to do so - will host the evening, starting at 6 p.m. If the world's fashion czarina says it's OK to shop, then it must be the right thing to do. "It's a global initiative to promote retail, restore consumer confidence, and celebrate fashion," said Patrick O'Connell, spokesman for Vogue magazine.
NEWS
April 20, 2008 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Her silk taffeta, ultra-mini bubble dress was showcased on billboards from Los Angeles to New York in the fall, worn by Gossip Girls star Taylor Momsen, Jenny Humphrey on the CW drama. American Idol singer and mega country star Carrie Underwood was spotted in the cutesy frock, as was Academy Award winner Hilary Swank. But despite the celebrity hoopla, free publicity, and dozens of inquiries, Manayunk designer Paula Hian sold just five of the $1,500 dresses. "When they heard how much it cost, they were like, 'Thank you,' and click," Hian said.
NEWS
June 28, 2007 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
In the late 1970s, before fashion was synonymous with celebrity, designer Liz Claiborne became a household name as among the first to introduce stylish separates to working women. Her work with tailored knits gave women climbing the corporate ladder the confidence to walk into the office on feminine terms. The softness of her fabrics was all woman, while the neutral colors conveyed a business-appropriate look for the serious-minded. Claiborne, along with Oscar de la Renta and Calvin Klein, expanded a fashion empire into a lifestyle brand.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2007 | By JOSEPH SANTOLIQUITO For the Daily News
AMY WESTCOTT had a vivid imagination at a young age. While other girls were using tissue and tape to make dresses for their dolls, Westcott wanted something silky, slinky even. So when Westcott and her older sister Lora stumbled upon her mom's fabric stash within the maze of boxes, stored toys and old furniture in their parents' attic, they were thrilled. This gold mine yielded forest-green satins, pink organza and textured upholstery fabrics. There they sat, legs crossed, using jagged scissors to cut out the hottest designer doll clothes on the block.
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