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Fat Albert

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2001 | REGINA MEDINA Daily News wire services contributed to this report
HEY, HEY, HEY you wanna be Fat Albert? Philly's treasured celeb Bill Cosby is on the fence about whose pipes will be used for the irrepressible '70s cartoon character in the upcoming "Fat Albert" movie, which he just finished co-writing. He's trying to decide whether fans want to hear him do the voices of Fat Albert, Bill and Mushmouth again, just as he did for the TV series he created. Oh, say it ain't so, Cos! "I don't know if my Fat Albert, if it's a little too full and robust now and old," the North Philly native told AP Radio.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2001 | By Regina Medina The Hollywood Reporter and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Hey, hey, hey - guess who's coming to the big screen? That lovable portly dispenser of North Philly wisdom, Fat Albert. Native son Bill Cosby is teaming with Twentieth Century Fox to produce a live-action comedy about the small-screen animated character, loved by many Saturday morning viewers who cozied up in their PJs while chowing down a Pop-Tart or two. The movie, set to be produced by John Davis, could go before the cameras early next year....
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2002 | REGINA MEDINA Free-lance Writer Laura Randall and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
PESKY "creative differences" halted pre-production last week on the live-action "Fat Albert" movie, resulting in director Forest Whitaker leaving the Bill Cosby project. The studio, 20th Century Fox, says the interruption over conflicting visions is only temporary, the Hollywood Reporter said. Still, when asked whether the project can be put back together with another auteur, Fox spokesman Jeffrey Godsick could only muster, "We're evaluating that now," the trade paper said. "[Forest]
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2004 | HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
HEY. HEY. HEY. Kenan Thompson is "Fat Albert. " The Hollywood Reporter says the "Saturday Night Live" regular, and former star of "Kenan and Kel," will play Bill Cosby's big boy when director Joel Zwick starts production in mid-April. Other members of the cast include Omarion of B2K fame as Reggie, Raven-Symone in the animated part of Danielle, Jermaine Williams as Mush Mouth, Jeremy Suarez in the animated role of Russell and Aaron Frazier as Weird Harold. Cosby, his wife Camille, and John Davis Entertainment are producing the adaptation, which follows Fat Albert and his pals walking out of their cartoon and into the real world.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of my most vivid childhood experiences is tied inextricably to the kids' cartoon Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids . It was the first show my family sat down to watch when my dad finally, finally! , bought a color TV set. It was a hit in America, where it premiered in September 1972 as part of CBS's Saturday morning cartoon lineup. It also was a hit half a world away in my native Iran, where my two brothers and I watched religiously as Fat Albert and his gang - seven very distinct kids and one busybody duck named Cluck - had unforgettable adventures in their North Philadelphia neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2002 | By LAURA RANDALL For the Daily News
Mushmouth, Dumb Donald and Old Weird Harold will all be back. So will the junkyard. So will the daily life lessons that were always served up with the humor. Fat Albert, the famed cartoon character based on Bill Cosby's stand-up acts about his Philly childhood, starts his journey to the big screen next month, when shooting begins in Los Angeles with a live cast, major studio budget, and the support of the Cos himself. The movie version mixes animation with live action and won't be exactly the same as the long-running CBS TV series "Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids," director Forest Whitaker told the Daily News.
NEWS
December 23, 2004 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We '70s kids watched Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids all the time. I remember wearing patchwork jeans, a bumblebee T-shirt, and singing "Nah, nah, nah, gonna have a good time . . . Hey, hey, hey!" I was so small, not only didn't my feet touch the floor, they didn't even reach past the edge of the couch. Those were simpler times, you know, when carpet was a luxury and hardwood floors were standard. Wall-paneling wasn't considered retro. Sisters shared rooms outfitted with twin beds and Raggedy Ann dolls, not televisions and telephones.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2004 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fat Albert took a mere 30 years to get from Bill Cosby's golden mouth to the silver screen. If the Disney amusement park ride Pirates of the Caribbean can morph into a hit movie, certainly an indelible Cosby routine can find new life, first as a cartoon show, now as a feature movie. Affable Kenan Thompson, of Saturday Night Live and Nickelodeon's Kenan & Kel, does the best he can in a fat suit and a size XXXL red crewneck while being forced to say "hey hey hey" a thousand times or so. Alas, this eternally sunny character's mantra, "I don't have a problem, I solve problems," makes for paltry dramatic tension.
NEWS
December 7, 2004
I'D LIKE TO give Mister Mann Frisby a round of applause for his article regarding the way Bill Cosby dresses, and his analysis of the problems facing black youth. Mr. Cosby criticized ebonics in the past and how you can't get a job saying "you is," etc. But, Cos, didn't you have a show back in 1972 where the characters spoke ebonics? I'm talking about the cartoon "Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids," which was one of my favorites because of the moral lessons in each episode. And I agree with Mister on your appearance.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1986 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
The truth is, he's straight, upright. A Polish guy from Bridesburg. Family man. Salesman. But 41 nights a year, including tomorrow, he goes to the Spectrum, puts on a silly costume and is transformed into a cross between the Fonz and Fat Albert - a fat, fuzzy, purple creature with orange hair who performs all manner of foolishness and flippery. He's Big Shot, mascot of the Philadelphia 76ers, and the fans love him. It wasn't always that way. Once it was: "Get out of the way, stupid.
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NEWS
July 14, 2013 | BY ELLEN GRAY, Daily News Television Critic graye@phillynews.com, 215-854-5950
Bill Cosby will be back on TV this fall, if only for one night. Comedy Central announced yesterday - on the Philly-born comedian's 76th birthday - that it would air Cosby's first televised concert special in 30 years, "Far From Finished," on Nov. 24, the Sunday before Thanksgiving. Directed by actor and director Robert Townsend ("The Five Heartbeats"), the special will be made up of material Cosby performed last month at the Cerritos Performing Arts Center in Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of my most vivid childhood experiences is tied inextricably to the kids' cartoon Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids . It was the first show my family sat down to watch when my dad finally, finally! , bought a color TV set. It was a hit in America, where it premiered in September 1972 as part of CBS's Saturday morning cartoon lineup. It also was a hit half a world away in my native Iran, where my two brothers and I watched religiously as Fat Albert and his gang - seven very distinct kids and one busybody duck named Cluck - had unforgettable adventures in their North Philadelphia neighborhood.
SPORTS
January 21, 2011 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
The following is an excerpt from Thursday's Ask Gonzo chat on Philly.com with columnist John Gonzalez. Just got done watching the latest SportsDome . For research, of course. I think the bosses should give me a raise for doing all that extra work. Best line: "[Gary] Bettman staked his entire financial future on the success of his strange ice sport. " Mercy. I'm still laughing. Onward . . . Comment From Chris: How much longer will I have to watch Andre Iguodala lose games for the Sixers?
NEWS
December 6, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
BACK IN the bad old days of Philadelphia public housing, high-rise buildings blotted out the sky. Crime was abundant, and the stairs stank of urine and garbage. Elevators rarely worked, and children sometimes plunged to their deaths down the dark shafts. When the elevators were out of service and there was some kind of energency up high, somebody had to climb those smelly stairs, as much as 17-18 stories. This was William E. Parks, Philadelphia Housing Authority cop, who didn't appreciate the aerobic workouts he was getting on those steps as he rushed to help people in trouble.
NEWS
December 23, 2009 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bill Cosby is the winner of the city's 2010 Marian Anderson Award, given to prominent artists who have achieved distinction for their humanitarian work. The Philadelphia-born Cosby, 72, is a much-decorated comedian, actor, and social activist, with nine Grammys, three Emmys, a Kennedy Center Honor, and a Presidential Medal of Freedom. This year, he received the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. In the announcement at the Sofitel hotel yesterday, Mayor Nutter called Cosby "a comedian whose gentle humor . . . pioneered a path forward for African American artists.
NEWS
June 14, 2007 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The creators of the Philadelphia-based cartoon The Adventures of Teddy P. Brains have gone a step beyond the one-to-grow-on lessons of Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids. Joseph Lewis III and Eugene Haynes designed 6-year-old time and space traveler Teddy P. Brains as a math, science and history whiz with an unquenchable thirst for learning. And what the young P. Brains doesn't know off the top of his little chocolate head, he asks his "Brainberry. " "It shows that children of color can live exciting lives," said Yumy Odom, a Temple University professor and founder of the East Coast Black Age of Comics Convention.
NEWS
September 13, 2005 | By Dwayne Campbell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's well known now that Kanye West doesn't like mincing words, or following TelePrompTers, even when the words are about the President of the United States. West, who performed during the taping of MTV2's $2 Bill concert Saturday, told the music channel that he wasn't backing away from the harsh comments he made about President Bush during a live Hurricane Katrina relief telethon shown Sept. 2 on the networks of NBC. "I wasn't trying to particularly dis anybody like that," West told the music channel, saying the days following his declaration that the President "doesn't care about black people" were "crazy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2004 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fat Albert took a mere 30 years to get from Bill Cosby's golden mouth to the silver screen. If the Disney amusement park ride Pirates of the Caribbean can morph into a hit movie, certainly an indelible Cosby routine can find new life, first as a cartoon show, now as a feature movie. Affable Kenan Thompson, of Saturday Night Live and Nickelodeon's Kenan & Kel, does the best he can in a fat suit and a size XXXL red crewneck while being forced to say "hey hey hey" a thousand times or so. Alas, this eternally sunny character's mantra, "I don't have a problem, I solve problems," makes for paltry dramatic tension.
NEWS
December 23, 2004 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We '70s kids watched Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids all the time. I remember wearing patchwork jeans, a bumblebee T-shirt, and singing "Nah, nah, nah, gonna have a good time . . . Hey, hey, hey!" I was so small, not only didn't my feet touch the floor, they didn't even reach past the edge of the couch. Those were simpler times, you know, when carpet was a luxury and hardwood floors were standard. Wall-paneling wasn't considered retro. Sisters shared rooms outfitted with twin beds and Raggedy Ann dolls, not televisions and telephones.
NEWS
December 7, 2004
I'D LIKE TO give Mister Mann Frisby a round of applause for his article regarding the way Bill Cosby dresses, and his analysis of the problems facing black youth. Mr. Cosby criticized ebonics in the past and how you can't get a job saying "you is," etc. But, Cos, didn't you have a show back in 1972 where the characters spoke ebonics? I'm talking about the cartoon "Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids," which was one of my favorites because of the moral lessons in each episode. And I agree with Mister on your appearance.
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