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Fat Cats

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NEWS
October 13, 1994
Suddenly, anybody who forked over $5,000 to attend Mayor Rendell's fund- raiser last February looks like a piker. Some of the well-heeled guests at a private, invitation-only dinner at his house last Thursday were hit up for $25,000 and more. By stuffing his multimillion-dollar war chest with fat checks from fat cats, Mr. Rendell makes himself virtually unbeatable for re-election next year. But there's a price: The average resident has to wonder whether these donors will get special treatment from City Hall.
NEWS
October 28, 1986 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The campaign for two seats on the Camden County Board of Freeholders has been reduced to trading accusations that the opposition is being funded by "fat cats. " At a debate last night, the Democratic and Republican candidates in next Tuesday's election exchanged allegations that their rivals are bankrolled by people with deep pockets and hidden agendas. "I'm very concerned about all that money flowing in from North Jersey," Democrat Robert E. Andrews said of the Republican's campaign funding.
NEWS
April 3, 1996
No, the line-item veto isn't a magic wand that would balance the budget for the first time since 1969. That task will require a bipartisan deal that cuts back on entitlements, not a mini-veto that basically tells Congress: Hey, wait a minute. Still, giving the president this new power to reject spending items line-by-line - and to veto narrowly targeted tax breaks as well - serves the cause of fiscal responsibility. Call it a belated tribute to former President Ronald Reagan, who asked for it back while he was adding $1.4 trillion to the national debt.
NEWS
April 10, 1997 | By Kevin Phillips
Out in the real America, from New York to Los Angeles, April is tax time, when the average American taxpayer ruefully realizes that someone else must be enjoying all those fancy write-offs and deductions. In Washington, however, April is shaping up as a month when Congress is getting ready to pass even more breaks for the select few. Call it the Big Contributors and Influential Lobbyists Relief Act of 1997. If campaign-finance reform were on the books, the politicos wouldn't need to pay back their big donors so richly - but it isn't, and they do. That's entirely in keeping with everything else in the nation's capital these days - a city bankrupt of ideas, where money is all that matters.
NEWS
October 3, 2008
IRONY HAS a wicked sense of humor. For those of us who have very little, the current government and Wall Street fiascoes will not be the catalyst that leaves us shaking in our old, well-worn, freshly shined boots. We have-nots have a survival experience that the "fat cats" only know about from watching "Lost. " While they stand frozen in fear, we just reach down a little deeper, making a little less go a little further. You see, we have a paper bag full of moves that their Louis Vuitton bags don't carry.
NEWS
October 3, 1988
Budget crunch time usually comes toward the end of the city's fiscal year. Some time in March or April, the mayor discovers the city is running a little short. The reaction? First, the city imposes a hiring freeze. Then, it delays purchasing things like desks, lawn mowers, even toilet paper. When that's not enough to close the gap, it sometimes delays paying contractors until "next year. " This year is different. Only three months into the fiscal year, the budget crunch is hitting home with a vengeance.
NEWS
May 9, 1996
Years ago, when insurance companies were dumping their customers in Pennsylvania and refusing to write new policies, no public official came to our rescue. Today, Lynne Abraham, funded by the state, comes running to the rescue of the fat cats of the insurance companies. No wonder Americans join militias or embrace socialist ideologies. The Daily News itself became an apologist for the capitalist fat cats when your reporter outright lied in saying local insurance rates are high because a segment of the population is insured in other states.
NEWS
February 25, 1986
Now that Congress and the federal government can no longer afford to pay for the give-away programs they started, they are turning these programs over to the states. Great. There is one catch. We must reduce the federal taxes going to Washington since they are no longer funding these programs. They no longer need so much money. That way the states can increase their taxes by the amount the federal government no longer needs. Since Congress brought about the mess we are in with their deficit spending and only representing the special interest groups, we cannot let it escape the Gramm-Rudman noose.
NEWS
May 8, 2013
ALTHOUGH we at IBEW Local 98 appreciate Signe Wilkinson highlighting our newly created Rat-Mobile in a political cartoon, she missed a key point in the narrative. Rather than depicting unions as distributing political contributions - a tired old cliche - Signe should have depicted us doing the city's job: Collecting unpaid taxes, permit fees and license fees from unscrupulous developers and contractors. Exposing these cheats in order to help our cash-strapped city collect desperately needed revenue is our mission.
NEWS
March 22, 2002
Pigs flew over the U.S. Capitol Wednesday. Not really, but something happened that many had considered just as unlikely. Congress passed an honest-to-goodness reform of the poisoned, corrosive system by which federal political campaigns are financed. Don't lose sight of the central miracle of the bill known in the Senate as McCain-Feingold, in the House as Shays-Meehan. It is this: The politicians who voted to end the ugly reign of unregulated "soft" money could not be sure how what they were doing would affect their own futures.
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NEWS
April 21, 2016
I HAD TO RESPOND to Stu Bykofsky's column of April 15 the city's Deferred Retirement Option Program, or DROP. I have been a city employee for 26 years. I am so tired of you columnists writing one-sided articles. You want City Council to end DROP for everyone except police officers and firefighters? Why? They don't collect Social Security because they don't pay into Social Security. You didn't mention that in your article. You also did not mention that the unionized employees who utilize the DROP program have never returned to city employment.
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Kim Campbell Thornton, Universal Uclick
WHEN WE at Pet Connection say "fat cats," we're not talking Wall Street bankers. The percentage of cats considered to be overweight (10 to 19 percent greater than ideal weight) or obese (20 percent or greater than ideal body weight) has reached a whopping 58 percent, according to a survey by the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention. That makes excess weight the No. 1 nutritional disorder in cats. Carrying too many pounds is linked to a number of feline health problems. Obese cats are more likely to suffer a liver disease called hepatic lipidosis; feline urinary tract disease; diabetes; lameness; complications from anesthesia; and non-allergenic skin conditions.
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
The Democrats left, and the Carpenters union came back. With an inflated "fat cat" figure, a sound system, banners, and signs, about 50 carpenters protested outside the Convention Center on Friday afternoon, pressing the state authority that runs the venue to let them back in. The scene served as a noisy reminder of lingering labor issues in the city less than 24 hours after the team scouting Philadelphia for the 2016 Democratic National Convention...
NEWS
May 8, 2013
ALTHOUGH we at IBEW Local 98 appreciate Signe Wilkinson highlighting our newly created Rat-Mobile in a political cartoon, she missed a key point in the narrative. Rather than depicting unions as distributing political contributions - a tired old cliche - Signe should have depicted us doing the city's job: Collecting unpaid taxes, permit fees and license fees from unscrupulous developers and contractors. Exposing these cheats in order to help our cash-strapped city collect desperately needed revenue is our mission.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Dick Polman, For The Inquirer
If you watch a lot of TV - and, hey, who doesn't? - you may have noticed that your life has suddenly improved. You're no longer facing a ceaseless barrage of political ads sponsored by groups with innocuous-sounding names like Restore Our Future, American Crossroads, and Priorities USA Action. They're blessedly gone, as are the fat cats who helped bankroll the priciest election season in history. There's more good news: Most of them wasted their money on losers. To update Winston Churchill, never have so many expended so much for so little.
NEWS
November 16, 2011
The Occupy Philly protesters have worn out their welcome at their tent-city encampment on Dilworth Plaza in Center City. For the Occupy movement nationally, it's also time to reassess its strategy to bring about economic, governmental, and social change. Americans struggling to emerge from a devastating recession don't see how the Occupy camp-outs are making any difference. With their numbers in Philadelphia swelled by the homeless, reports of a weekend rape in a tent, the arrest Tuesday of two men who police say punched others at the site, and with what city officials view as a growing public-health threat from unsanitary conditions and fire hazards, it's clearly time for the Occupy Philly contingent to move on. Beyond the obvious fraying of conditions at the loosely organized protest, the local Occupy folks are standing in the way of a $50 million makeover of the plaza due to start this month.
NEWS
September 19, 2011
EVERYBODY remembers where they were on 9/11, but it was the day after that I remember most. I worked the night shift on 9/11 after watching TV all day. On 9/12, there was no noise, nobody running for the bus, no children going to school, no airplane noise. People were walking around in a daze, some crying. It reminded me of the day JFK was killed when I was a kid. My father used to tell me about Pearl Harbor, and what Americans felt. I understand now, because on 9/12, I felt the same way. I wanted to go to war and make the people who did this pay. We all felt so helpless.
NEWS
September 14, 2011 | BY JOHN JOHNSON JR. 'W
HICH Side Are You On?" is a song written in 1931 by Florence Reece, the wife of an organizer for the United Mine Workers. But the lyric "It seems like it's illegal to fight for the union anymore" feels very current as even the right to collective bargaining is under attack by many state governments. Unions are a very important part of our history, yet it's a topic rarely taught in schools. Given all that's going on these days with organized labor and jobs, especially public-sector unions, maybe it's time to reflect on who we are, and what we stand for. When "Which Side Are You On?
NEWS
March 22, 2011 | By DOM GIORDANO
GOV. CORBETT has been criticized for not engaging the media early in his term. Well, if he acted like a silent movie star before announcing his first budget, then his actual budget address and his recent interview with me have been treated with the fanfare of a big- budget Hollywood blockbuster. In his budget address, Corbett struck the theme that the commonwealth is facing a $4 billion hole, and what he calls the "education industry" shouldn't be insulated from helping to fill it. This has led to proposed cutbacks in state funding for local school districts, but the most controversial cutbacks involve Pennsylvania colleges and universities that receive significant state funding.
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