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Fat Jokes

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NEWS
February 6, 2013 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Letterman once altered a video to make it look as if Gov. Christie was preparing a turkey in the middle of an MSNBC-TV interview. He has also depicted the New Jersey governor struggling to get out of a chair during an Oprah interview. Letterman even devoted an entire "Top 10" list to Christie fat jokes: What if Christie were president? "Instead of Iraq, we'd invade IHOP. " And: "The cabinet now has a Secretary of Cake. " On Monday night, the governor got his payback. He made his first appearance ever on Late Night With David Letterman , and, according to highlights released by CBS, the governor at one point pulled a doughnut out of his pocket - and took a bite.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1990 | By Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Perhaps the most important thing to say about "Babes" is that it's not nearly as terrible as it might have been. As described earlier this summer by Fox's publicity machine, "Babes" - which premieres at 8:30 tonight on Channel 29 - would be about three fat sisters living in a tiny apartment. Period. That left only the worst to the imagination - a non-stop 30 minutes of fat jokes. Make no mistake, this new sitcom doesn't shy away from fat jokes. There is the predictable collapsing sofa, the obvious obsession with junk food.
NEWS
July 2, 2015
NOW THAT JERSEY'S big boy has cannonballed into the presidential pool, the question is whether he sinks or swims. There's a good argument for sinking. He's in a (so far) 14-way Republican primary in which he polls in low single-digits. His approval rating in his own state is 30 percent, after topping 70 percent just two years back, so he isn't exactly ascending. He gave a dud 2012 convention speech more about himself than about nominee Mitt Romney. He warmly embraced President Obama after Hurricane Sandy prior to the 2012 election; some Republicans actually believe that helped Obama win. There's the George Washington Bridge thing.
NEWS
July 3, 1996 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
Members of a local support group for the overweight had a hefty surprise last week: They really liked Eddie Murphy's new movie, "The Nutty Professor. " A group of Ample Awakenings members, a Philadelphia-South Jersey organization, took in "The Nutty Professor" in Pennsauken, N.J., to scope it out for political incorrectness of the large variety. "I really didn't know what to expect," said Deborah Scipio, Ample's director, who said she had never seen Jerry Lewis' original version of the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Bobby and Peter Farrelly, those slapstick sibs who brought us There's Something About Mary, now give us Shallow Hal, a squirmingly unfunny comedy that tilts at the tyranny of the thin. And in the role of the gal that no guy dares look at because she's plus-sized, whom did the Farrellys cast? Not Camryn Manheim. Not Mia Tyler. Not Rosie O'Donnell. Not Oprah Winfrey. They picked Gwyneth Paltrow, she of the asparagus arms, toothpick thighs, and zero body fat. Which is as puzzling as casting Brad Pitt as the victim of white racists.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1995 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"I'm not going to camp with a bunch of fat loads!" declares Gerry Garner, a portly 11-year-old whose parents sit him down with a recruitment guy from Camp Hope - a place that looks pretty cool, what with its promotional video full of go-cart races and stuff, until Gerry realizes that everybody on the tape is carrying extra poundage. Of course, Gerry does end up going there, and of course we end up watching him and his overweight, underachieiving bunkmates, who struggle with the midnight munchies and a maniacal new owner using the campers as guinea pigs for what he envisions as "the number-one weight-loss infomercial in the country.
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Would America elect a fat president? As Gov. Christie reconsiders a presidential bid that could pit him against a trim President Obama, his acknowledged weight problem is a case study in politics and appearance in a hypervisual age. Fat is the word many Americans associate with Christie, just as black was the only thing many knew about Obama at this stage in the 2008 presidential election campaign, political observers say....
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1986 | By TOM SHALES, Special to the Daily News
America has had many voices, and for a time one of the loudest was Kate Smith's. It was a big, warm, all-embracing voice, and it sang us sentimental songs, and heartbreak songs, and picker-uppers, and at least one invocation: "God Bless America. " The voice was effectively stilled long before Kate Smith's death Tuesday, at 79, in Raleigh, N.C., of respiratory arrest, following years of illness. And yet Kate Smith's long career in records, radio and television was one marked by repeated comebacks after tragic setbacks.
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | By Leigh Jackson, Daily News Staff Writer
Don't call them plump, large-boned or fleshy. They are fat. And they belong to the swelling legion of obese people who say they are tired of living with fat jokes, too-small airplane seats and ugly clothing. At Big Girls, a Philadelphia group devoted to improving public perception of fat women, the emphasis is on self-esteem, not dieting. "If you're going to be heavy, you don't have to look like a slob. You don't have to have low self-esteem, and you don't have to be without a man," said Alletta Olday, 34, who wears size 26 to 32 and has impeccably manicured nails.
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NEWS
July 2, 2015
NOW THAT JERSEY'S big boy has cannonballed into the presidential pool, the question is whether he sinks or swims. There's a good argument for sinking. He's in a (so far) 14-way Republican primary in which he polls in low single-digits. His approval rating in his own state is 30 percent, after topping 70 percent just two years back, so he isn't exactly ascending. He gave a dud 2012 convention speech more about himself than about nominee Mitt Romney. He warmly embraced President Obama after Hurricane Sandy prior to the 2012 election; some Republicans actually believe that helped Obama win. There's the George Washington Bridge thing.
NEWS
February 6, 2013 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Letterman once altered a video to make it look as if Gov. Christie was preparing a turkey in the middle of an MSNBC-TV interview. He has also depicted the New Jersey governor struggling to get out of a chair during an Oprah interview. Letterman even devoted an entire "Top 10" list to Christie fat jokes: What if Christie were president? "Instead of Iraq, we'd invade IHOP. " And: "The cabinet now has a Secretary of Cake. " On Monday night, the governor got his payback. He made his first appearance ever on Late Night With David Letterman , and, according to highlights released by CBS, the governor at one point pulled a doughnut out of his pocket - and took a bite.
NEWS
October 28, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
University of Pennsylvania orthopedic surgeon John D. Kelly IV says the monthly humor column he writes for a medical trade magazine was due, so he "threw some jokes together" about fat patients. "You should worry about performing surgery on the supersized," Kelly riffed in that August piece, if "there is a comma in your patient's body weight. " Or if a patient "wears his wristwatch on his finger," needs "a blood pressure cuff the size of Montana," or "has more chins than a Chinese phone book.
NEWS
October 4, 2011 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Would America elect a fat president? As Gov. Christie reconsiders a presidential bid that could pit him against a trim President Obama, his acknowledged weight problem is a case study in politics and appearance in a hypervisual age. Fat is the word many Americans associate with Christie, just as black was the only thing many knew about Obama at this stage in the 2008 presidential election campaign, political observers say....
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Bobby and Peter Farrelly, those slapstick sibs who brought us There's Something About Mary, now give us Shallow Hal, a squirmingly unfunny comedy that tilts at the tyranny of the thin. And in the role of the gal that no guy dares look at because she's plus-sized, whom did the Farrellys cast? Not Camryn Manheim. Not Mia Tyler. Not Rosie O'Donnell. Not Oprah Winfrey. They picked Gwyneth Paltrow, she of the asparagus arms, toothpick thighs, and zero body fat. Which is as puzzling as casting Brad Pitt as the victim of white racists.
NEWS
July 3, 1996 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
Members of a local support group for the overweight had a hefty surprise last week: They really liked Eddie Murphy's new movie, "The Nutty Professor. " A group of Ample Awakenings members, a Philadelphia-South Jersey organization, took in "The Nutty Professor" in Pennsauken, N.J., to scope it out for political incorrectness of the large variety. "I really didn't know what to expect," said Deborah Scipio, Ample's director, who said she had never seen Jerry Lewis' original version of the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1995 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"I'm not going to camp with a bunch of fat loads!" declares Gerry Garner, a portly 11-year-old whose parents sit him down with a recruitment guy from Camp Hope - a place that looks pretty cool, what with its promotional video full of go-cart races and stuff, until Gerry realizes that everybody on the tape is carrying extra poundage. Of course, Gerry does end up going there, and of course we end up watching him and his overweight, underachieiving bunkmates, who struggle with the midnight munchies and a maniacal new owner using the campers as guinea pigs for what he envisions as "the number-one weight-loss infomercial in the country.
NEWS
November 30, 1993 | By Bridget Mount, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
From banning pornography to taking fat-joke mugs off the shelves at gift stores, Barry Hoffman wants everyone to know about censorship. The Springfield resident is the one-man show behind Gauntlet: Exploring the Limits of Free Expression, a biannual journal that documents incidents of censorship and presents various viewpoints on freedom of expression. Hoffman, a Philadelphia schoolteacher, said he got the idea for the publication when he saw how easy it was for parents to come in and get books taken off school and library shelves.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
Two years ago, Mary Brown recalled, she went to the Spectrum with her boyfriend and had to sit sideways. "I cried throughout the whole circus," the Clementon woman said. "Turnstiles!" exclaimed Donna Marie Naddeo of Forked River, evoking groans of commiseration. "I refuse to use them. I got stuck in one once," said a woman who would not give her name. She paused. "Ever wonder where skinny people keep all their organs? Like where do they keep their pancreas and liver in there; how does it all fit?"
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