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Fat Kid

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SPORTS
September 18, 1997 | By Joe Santoliquito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's something or, in this case, someone who takes over every time Sean Teesdale walks onto a soccer field. All special athletes have it: that fire, that intensity, that stare. For 80 minutes, when La Salle High plays a soccer game, "Evil Sean" takes over. The 5-foot-11, 155-pound junior goalkeeper is feisty and intense, likes to venture out from the net from time to time, and can be rambunctious - qualities many goalies do not possess. Those attributes make Teesdale one of the best goalkeepers in the area.
SPORTS
September 20, 2000 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
The list of people who can get away with calling Eagles rookie defensive tackle Corey Simon a "little fat kid," can't be a long one. It even might be limited to veteran defensive end Hugh Douglas. "I think he's made a lot of impact. He's playing real well. I can't say enough about the little fat kid," Douglas said, looking around to make sure Simon noticed. Hearing Douglas in the locker room isn't difficult. If there is one thing he is not, it's quiet. But making noise off the field is as fitting for Douglas as being able to call Simon names.
NEWS
July 14, 1997 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
For Marshall Stoltz, it all started many yesterdays ago with "Men of Tomorrow. " Stoltz was 11 when his father gave him and his older brother, Don, a calendar with a picture showing "a group of Scouts walking along a trail carrying a canoe. " It was titled "Men of Tomorrow. " Being Scouts themselves, "it meant something to us," Stoltz said. "We could understand it. It wasn't like a Picasso, where you say, 'What the hell is he trying to say here?' This picture we understood.
SPORTS
September 20, 1997 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Dennis Maguire was not going to play football this season at Archbishop Wood High. Nothing personal against the coaches. No friction with teammates. No trouble with marks or with behavior. After winning the individual championship last winter in Catholic League wrestling, Maguire intended to narrow his athletic focus. "I did a lot of thinking, talked to a lot of people," Maguire said. "They gave me great support and helped me realize what my priorities were. They talked about the senior-year thing, how you should get the most out of it. "I'm so glad I changed my mind.
SPORTS
August 13, 1994 | By Robert Seltzer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When he walked into a gym for the first time, Buster Mathis Jr. was three fighters in one - literally. He weighed 325 pounds, the equivalent of three junior flyweights and, to hide his girth, he favored large, baggy clothes that he did not wear so much as inhabit. He was 15. "Check this out," he said. "I'm going to tell you a story. I was a real fat kid. I tried baseball, basketball, football, wrestling, and I (stunk) at everything. When I asked a girl out, she would laugh at me. I had low self- esteem.
NEWS
August 27, 1996 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
While the rest of the world watches what it eats and avoids the sun's ultraviolet rays, a subculture exists where starving, bingeing and tanning are the keys to a beautiful body and the adoration that goes with it. And Chris Andruschkevich, 23, a handsome physical therapist's assistant from Moorestown, who has been into bodybuilding and weight training for about three years, has found himself in the thick of it. "I was the fat kid in high...
SPORTS
February 7, 1996 | By Joe Juliano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is a story about working hard and growing up. Malik Rose was cut from his junior varsity team at Overbrook High. He was ignored by all but a handful of colleges - "I was just a big, massive, fat kid," he says. He almost became academically ineligible after his freshman year. He was so emotional on the basketball court that in his sophomore season, he once picked up technical fouls in three consecutive games. Now look at Rose. Drexel's senior center is known as "The Shaq of the NAC. " The onetime fat kid is a finely chiseled, 6-foot-7, 250 pounds.
SPORTS
August 25, 1998 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Heavyweight novelty act Eric "Butterbean" Esch was giving his take on his incredible popularity, which sounded a bit like the plot from "Revenge of the Nerds. " "It goes back to childhood," said the 330-pound former mobile-home factory worker from Jasper, Ala. "Some kids feel like they have to pick on the fat kid, the girl with braces, the kid with glasses. Anybody who looks different. Appearances are important at that age. Some people, I guess, think they're always important. "I still hear a lot of nasty comments from people who are hung up on the weight thing.
NEWS
July 8, 2011 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four times a week at the Philadelphia Sports Club in Society Hill, a band of masochistic loyalists gathers to do Scott Dougherty's bidding. The glass-and-mirrors exercise room overlooks Fifth Street, so passersby in the mood for a little schadenfreude can watch them suffer. The exercises may seem routine. The crunch. The lunge. The plank. The push-up. But Dougherty's repertoire is expansive and fierce, with complicated moves bearing exotic names like the Turkish Get-Up, which should be outlawed by the Geneva Conventions.
SPORTS
March 22, 2008 | By BILL LYON FOR THE INQUIRER
In the beginning, it is Devil's Island. It is a place of exile. It is where you station the fat kid. Or the one with glasses. And then you hope no one hits a ball out there. The kid himself hopes so even more fervently than you. Prayer is very big in Position No. 9 But as you move up in competition, right field begins to assume importance and cachet and glamour. It has become, by tradition, one of the Big Stick positions, a place to stash one of your most robust hitters. No. 9 frequently bats No. 3, No. 4 or No. 5 in the order.
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NEWS
July 8, 2011 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four times a week at the Philadelphia Sports Club in Society Hill, a band of masochistic loyalists gathers to do Scott Dougherty's bidding. The glass-and-mirrors exercise room overlooks Fifth Street, so passersby in the mood for a little schadenfreude can watch them suffer. The exercises may seem routine. The crunch. The lunge. The plank. The push-up. But Dougherty's repertoire is expansive and fierce, with complicated moves bearing exotic names like the Turkish Get-Up, which should be outlawed by the Geneva Conventions.
SPORTS
March 22, 2008 | By BILL LYON FOR THE INQUIRER
In the beginning, it is Devil's Island. It is a place of exile. It is where you station the fat kid. Or the one with glasses. And then you hope no one hits a ball out there. The kid himself hopes so even more fervently than you. Prayer is very big in Position No. 9 But as you move up in competition, right field begins to assume importance and cachet and glamour. It has become, by tradition, one of the Big Stick positions, a place to stash one of your most robust hitters. No. 9 frequently bats No. 3, No. 4 or No. 5 in the order.
NEWS
July 12, 2007 | By John Christoffersen, ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW HAVEN, Conn. - Overweight children are stigmatized by their peers as early as age 3 and even face bias from their parents and teachers, giving them a quality of life comparable to people with cancer, a new analysis concludes. Youngsters who report teasing, rejection, bullying and other types of abuse because of their weight are two to three times more likely to report suicidal thoughts as well as to suffer from health issues such as high blood pressure and eating disorders, researchers said.
SPORTS
September 20, 2000 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
The list of people who can get away with calling Eagles rookie defensive tackle Corey Simon a "little fat kid," can't be a long one. It even might be limited to veteran defensive end Hugh Douglas. "I think he's made a lot of impact. He's playing real well. I can't say enough about the little fat kid," Douglas said, looking around to make sure Simon noticed. Hearing Douglas in the locker room isn't difficult. If there is one thing he is not, it's quiet. But making noise off the field is as fitting for Douglas as being able to call Simon names.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2000 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
His name is Kevin Chamberlin, and even if you did not know that until now, chances are you've seen his big, round face somewhere. If not in that current Wendy's ad, perhaps it was the one plugging Stella D'Oro breadsticks or Nyquil. Maybe you saw him as the bomb squad detective on the big screen in Die Hard With a Vengeance. Now here he is in line for a Tony Award for featured actor this Sunday night (showing at 8 p.m. on PBS and 9 p.m. on CBS) for his performance as Charlie, an obsessed Mae West fan, and eight other roles in the fast-paced, hilarious and gentle Dirty Blonde.
SPORTS
November 15, 1999 | By Rich Fisher, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Rowan offensive lineman Brian Wright was attending Lackawanna Junior College in Pennsylvania, Monday nights used to be "wing night" with his football teammates. "We'd come home from practice, none of us would want to sit in the house and cook," Wright said. "So we would just go out, watch wrestling and eat wings. "We actually got kicked out of a couple places, our whole team would go in and eat so much. I think we closed a few of those places down. " As the establishments shut down, Wright beefed up - in all the wrong areas.
SPORTS
August 25, 1998 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Heavyweight novelty act Eric "Butterbean" Esch was giving his take on his incredible popularity, which sounded a bit like the plot from "Revenge of the Nerds. " "It goes back to childhood," said the 330-pound former mobile-home factory worker from Jasper, Ala. "Some kids feel like they have to pick on the fat kid, the girl with braces, the kid with glasses. Anybody who looks different. Appearances are important at that age. Some people, I guess, think they're always important. "I still hear a lot of nasty comments from people who are hung up on the weight thing.
SPORTS
September 20, 1997 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Dennis Maguire was not going to play football this season at Archbishop Wood High. Nothing personal against the coaches. No friction with teammates. No trouble with marks or with behavior. After winning the individual championship last winter in Catholic League wrestling, Maguire intended to narrow his athletic focus. "I did a lot of thinking, talked to a lot of people," Maguire said. "They gave me great support and helped me realize what my priorities were. They talked about the senior-year thing, how you should get the most out of it. "I'm so glad I changed my mind.
SPORTS
September 18, 1997 | By Joe Santoliquito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's something or, in this case, someone who takes over every time Sean Teesdale walks onto a soccer field. All special athletes have it: that fire, that intensity, that stare. For 80 minutes, when La Salle High plays a soccer game, "Evil Sean" takes over. The 5-foot-11, 155-pound junior goalkeeper is feisty and intense, likes to venture out from the net from time to time, and can be rambunctious - qualities many goalies do not possess. Those attributes make Teesdale one of the best goalkeepers in the area.
NEWS
July 14, 1997 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
For Marshall Stoltz, it all started many yesterdays ago with "Men of Tomorrow. " Stoltz was 11 when his father gave him and his older brother, Don, a calendar with a picture showing "a group of Scouts walking along a trail carrying a canoe. " It was titled "Men of Tomorrow. " Being Scouts themselves, "it meant something to us," Stoltz said. "We could understand it. It wasn't like a Picasso, where you say, 'What the hell is he trying to say here?' This picture we understood.
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