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NEWS
January 29, 2006 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rimal is one of Gaza's better neighborhoods, though you wouldn't call it posh. Its broken roads, tattered storefronts, and graffiti-splashed walls are just a cut above the dreary standard here. On a street named Charles de Gaulle to honor a visit years ago by Jacques Chirac, elementary school math teacher Mahdi Brahim Kumssan, 43, lives with his wife, Mona, and their eight children, ages 4 to 17. A lifelong supporter of the Fatah movement, which helped put Palestinian nationalism on the map, Kumssan bolted his party in the recent parliamentary election to vote for its bitter rival, the Islamic resistance movement Hamas.
NEWS
January 20, 2006 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For many years this northern West Bank city was a reliable stronghold for Fatah, the political movement founded five decades ago that went on to monopolize Palestinian government. Now, with the first Palestinian parliamentary election since 1996 set for Wednesday, many here are itching to cast Fatah out. "Fatah is in my blood, but now I want a change," said Hosam Abdel Mu'ti, 35, a stall owner hawking cosmetics in the casbah. Like so many others in this city of 120,000, and across the West Bank and Gaza Strip, Mu'ti is fed up with perceived corruption in the Fatah-led Palestinian Authority.
NEWS
December 21, 2006 | By Ned Warwick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fatah, once the fiery Palestinian party of kaffiyeh-wearing Yasir Arafat and shadowy guerrilla fighters, today is limping around on a cane, suffering from tired blood. Routed at the polls, outmaneuvered on the streets, accused of chronic corruption and lacking a unifying agenda, Fatah is struggling today to stay relevant. Last Saturday, its leader, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, took a gamble to regain the party's momentum and to reverse its declining fortunes by calling for new elections.
NEWS
May 4, 2011 | By Maggie Michael, Associated Press
CAIRO - Fifteen Palestinian factions, including extremist Islamic groups, endorsed a reconciliation deal Tuesday meant to end a four-year rift between the two major Palestinian political movements, Hamas and Fatah. The declaration paved the way for the two groups to sign the deal Wednesday, then form a unity caretaker government to prepare for national elections next year. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu issued a last-minute appeal to Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas to cancel the impending deal, which he called a "hard blow to the peace process.
NEWS
January 14, 2007 | By Ned Warwick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Palestinian politics, which often play out against a backdrop of stuttering guns and wailing sirens, are not for the mild and retiring. Thus it was a vintage and electric moment last Sunday when Mohammed Dahlan, a leader of the long-awaited "next generation" of the Fatah movement, took the stage of a huge rally in a dilapidated soccer stadium here and waved away his bodyguards. To Fatah's archrival, he roared into the microphone, "Let Hamas shoot me. " The crowd standing raptly in a raw downpour erupted ecstatically at the taunt and afterward paraded the nattily dressed Dahlan on its adoring shoulders.
NEWS
January 10, 1994 | Daily News wire services
JERUSALEM PLO OFFICIALS STEP DOWN Three officials of the PLO's main Fatah faction in the occupied West Bank have resigned their committee posts in protest at the way the PLO is run, Palestinian sources said yesterday. Their resignations raised to at least 10 the number of local Fatah leaders to quit since the Palestine Liberation Organization and Israel signed a peace accord last September.
NEWS
February 12, 2007 | Inquirer wire services
Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert signaled yesterday that the accord Hamas and Fatah have signed forming a Palestinian national unity government won't serve as a basis for further peace talks. The Palestinians must abide by international demands to recognize Israel, renounce violence, and accept past peace agreements with the Jewish state, Olmert said at the opening of the weekly cabinet meeting today. An agreement was signed Thursday between Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas of Fatah and the Islamic militant Hamas group, which won January 2006 elections.
NEWS
January 5, 2013
VP says Chavez needn't appear CARACAS, Venezuela - The vice president said Friday that President Hugo Chavez could be sworn in by the Supreme Court later on if he's not able to take the oath of office this week before lawmakers because of his struggle with cancer in Cuba. Vice President Nicolas Maduro made the comment in a televised interview on Friday night, dismissing the argument by some opposition leaders that new elections must be called if Chavez doesn't take office as scheduled on Thursday.
NEWS
December 2, 2004 | By Dion Nissenbaum and Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Jailed Palestinian uprising leader Marwan Barghouti announced yesterday that he was running to succeed the late Yasir Arafat as president of the Palestinian Authority, and Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's ruling coalition threatened to fall apart over a budget dispute. It was Barghouti's surprise announcement that most roiled the political waters. Barghouti, 45, is a leader of younger Palestinians who are looking to wrest control of the Fatah party from the "old guard" of leaders who returned from exile with Arafat a decade ago. Just last week, Barghouti had acceded to intense appeals for unity from Fatah leaders and bowed out of the race, declaring his support for Palestine Liberation Organization leader Mahmoud Abbas, 69, in the Jan. 9 election.
NEWS
January 27, 2006
Palestinians deserve praise for holding an election Wednesday that observers called free, fair and well-run. The polling drew a historically high turnout to determine who would serve in parliament. The winner, though, was a shock - and it's hard to tell whether the electoral triumph of Hamas, a radical Islamic group that has called for Israel's destruction, can bring Palestinians any closer to the homeland they should have. Hamas, whose ugly specialty has been detonating suicide bombs in Israel, didn't just win. It won by a landslide, getting 76 out of 132 seats.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
As the Gaza war drags on and the terrible civilian death toll keeps rising, it's necessary to look to the past to find a way to stop the killing. It's particularly vital to revisit the moment in 2005 when Israel made a strategic error by unilaterally withdrawing from the Gaza Strip. I wrote then that Israel should have negotiated its withdrawal with the moderate Palestinian Authority president, Mahmoud Abbas, and let him take the credit. The failure to do so undercut Abbas: Hamas claimed that violence, not negotiations, forced Israel to exit.
NEWS
January 5, 2013
VP says Chavez needn't appear CARACAS, Venezuela - The vice president said Friday that President Hugo Chavez could be sworn in by the Supreme Court later on if he's not able to take the oath of office this week before lawmakers because of his struggle with cancer in Cuba. Vice President Nicolas Maduro made the comment in a televised interview on Friday night, dismissing the argument by some opposition leaders that new elections must be called if Chavez doesn't take office as scheduled on Thursday.
NEWS
November 28, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Looking back, with a cease-fire in place in Gaza, it's easy to understand why Israel retaliated against Hamas rocket attacks. It's harder to fathom why the Israeli government is boosting the stature of the Hamas militants who rule the Gaza Strip. Presumably this was not Jerusalem's intention. The Israeli government wanted to send Hamas a message that the increasing number of attacks will no longer be tolerated. But, paradoxically, Israel's tactics enhanced the stature of the very militants it wants to curb.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Karin Laub and Mohammed Daraghmeh, Associated Press
RAMALLAH, West Bank - Palestinians voted for new local councils in dozens of West Bank towns in long delayed elections Saturday, part of an attempt by Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas and his Fatah movement to recapture dwindling political legitimacy. However, the toxic rivalry between Fatah and the Islamic militant Hamas loomed large over the first Palestinian ballot in six years, and made it unlikely that Saturday's voting will be followed anytime soon by overdue elections for parliament and president.
NEWS
July 1, 2012 | By Ibrahim Barzak and Karin Laub, Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - In five years of rule in the Gaza Strip, Hamas has established a functioning, authoritarian mini-state with a strong Islamic flavor, so in control that nothing short of an unlikely Israeli military takeover seems capable of dislodging the militants. The Islamists of Palestine were once respected as a supposedly honest alternative to corrupt secular rivals, the Western-backed Fatah group led by the late Yasser Arafat. But that luster has mostly been lost as miserable Gaza becomes even poorer and more aid-dependent.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Ibrahim Barzak and Mohammed Daraghmeh, ASSOCIATED PRESS
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Hamas chief Khaled Mashaal has decided not to seek another term, the movement said Saturday, paving the way for a possible leadership contest at a time when the anti-Israeli Islamic group faces far-reaching decisions on whether to stay the course of militancy or moderate. However, Hamas suggested Mashaal could be asked to stay on, in what would be a boost for his more pragmatic line. Mashaal could not be reached for comment Saturday, but his decision not to seek another term as head of Hamas' political bureau was confirmed in a Hamas statement.
NEWS
December 23, 2011 | By Mohammed Daraghmeh, Associated Press
CAIRO - The rival Palestinian factions Fatah and Hamas took an important step Thursday toward reconciliation, announcing plans for the Islamic Hamas to join the umbrella group that has overseen two decades of on-and-off peace talks with Israel. The deal to admit Hamas into the Fatah-dominated Palestine Liberation Organization could have deep repercussions. Hamas has opposed the talks and rejects Israel's right to exist. A strong Hamas voice in the group would further complicate the troubled Mideast diplomatic process.
NEWS
November 16, 2011 | By Mohammed Daraghmeh, Ian Deitch and Diaa Hadid, Associated Press
The rival Palestinian factions Fatah and Hamas have agreed to hold elections next May, a senior official said Tuesday, in what would be a major step toward ending a four-year rift. Azzam al-Ahmad, a senior Fatah negotiator, said the sides agreed on the election plan in secret talks and were expected to formally approve it later this month. The plan calls for establishing a caretaker government to prepare for the vote - most likely without current Prime Minister Salam Fayyad. Dismissing Fayyad would be a huge gamble.
NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
JERUSALEM - Jubilation over the impending prisoner swap between Israel and the Palestinian militant group Hamas began to subside Wednesday as people on both sides expressed concerns that their leaders may have given away too much at the negotiating table. Though many Palestinians celebrated the expected release of 1,027 prisoners from Israeli jails, some were disappointed the list did not include high-profile leaders such as Marwan Barghouti and Ahmed Saadat. The two were convicted by Israeli courts of orchestrating terrorist attacks and are serving life sentences.
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