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SPORTS
May 9, 1989 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Writer
"I won't be old 'til my feet hurt, and they only hurt when I don't let 'em dance enough, so I'll keep right on dancing. " - Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, dancer Bob Boone doesn't want to dance today. It is a gorgeous afternoon in late April, and the last thing the Kansas City Royals catcher feels like doing is dragging himself down to the stadium six hours before game time to swing around 15-pound weights for an hour and a half. His wife is in town from California for a weekend visit, he has several errands to run and he needs to start packing for a seven-game road trip that begins the next night.
SPORTS
June 8, 1989 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Writer
It is 3 1/2 hours before game time. Too early for batting practice and too hot to amble out yet into the 98-degree sauna that is this steamy late Texas afternoon. In the Texas Rangers' clubhouse, some of the players are passing the time reading, some are playing cards, some are just sitting around, having their consciousness cleansed by the George Thorogood and the Destroyers tape that is playing on the stereo system. In the back of the room, a couple of the kids are having some fun with the old guy again.
NEWS
July 10, 1991
SIGN OF THE TIMES 'But officer, it said 'Fine for parking'. " - Rick Selvin. UPSET OVER 'UPSET' Why do sports writers and editors continue to use and abuse the word "upset" so that it's now totally meaningless? - Roy Nassau. SHOULD BE 'R, W & A' With all the revived interest in education and literacy, why do we still refer to reading, writing and arithmetic as the "Three Rs?" - Roy Nassau. LAUGH LINE Everything seemed funnier when all the comedians were named "Jackie.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2006 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
AS INDEPENDENCE Month comes to a close - and the controversy over "the American Way" being deleted from "Superman Returns" still simmers - it is worth asking whether there are any patriotic heroes left in comics. Of course there is the Man of Steel, although patriotism has been downplayed lately. There is also Captain America, but his status as a symbol of America has not really been explored in his book recently (that's a subject for another column). But a book exploring the complexities and realities of the American dream is "Uncle Sam and the Freedom Fighters.
NEWS
December 31, 2004 | By Janice Jakubowitcz
It is New Year's Eve. Some of us are getting out our party shoes; others are planning a quiet evening at home. As usual, I'll be hosting a small gathering with family and friends, safely away from crowds, costly restaurant parties and drunken drivers. The television will be on at 11:55 p.m. for our ritual - watching the ball fall at Times Square. There is another ritual for me, and many thousands of other people, each New Year's Eve. I must decide whether to make resolutions or set goals for the coming year.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
A SHOT IN THE ARM Flu shots aren't just for grownups. "Any child 6 months or older who suffers from severe asthma, cystic fibrosis, a cardiac condition, chronic infections, a chronic lung condition or sickle-cell anemia should be vaccinated," says Sarah Long, chief of the section of infectious diseases at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children. LABELING THE PROBLEM School's in, and so, for the 20th year, is Campbell's Labels for Education Program (LFE), which allows schools to redeem Campbell's brand labels for educational equipment.
SPORTS
October 15, 2011 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
There were no more questions for Bernard Hopkins last week at the Joe Hand Boxing Gym on North Third Street after Hopkins had colorfully filibustered through a news conference before Saturday's WBC light-heavyweight world title defense against Chad Dawson in Los Angeles. Then Hopkins, who has a big stake in the pay-per-view promotion, realized one question hadn't been asked. Why watch the fight? Sure, the 46-year-old keeps making history after becoming the oldest fighter to win a major world title.
SPORTS
February 19, 1993 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Jimmy Connors is 40 and semiretired from the ATP Tour. John McEnroe is 34 and working in a New York art gallery, possibly planning to open his own gallery. Won't that be fun when someone criticizes the paintings in McEnroe's gallery? With McEnroe and Connors non-factors on the tour, soon-to-be 33 Ivan Lendl remains as the "Father Time" of men's tennis. The spry, old coot disposed of Jim Grabb yesterday, 6-4, 7-6 (7-3), to set up a quarterfinal tonight against No. 5 seed MaliVai Washington.
SPORTS
October 25, 2013 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
IT'S NOT AS IF Bernard Hopkins needs any additional psychological advantages. In his quarter-century of boxing, the legendary Philadelphia champion has mastered the art of pushing just the right buttons to throw his opponent off edge. Hopkins can be irritating, and if he can talk his way into getting you angry enough to stray from your game plan, he will. He understands the intricacies of the mental warfare that has always been a part of boxing. Now, Mother Nature and Father Time have conspired to give Hopkins the ultimate psychological weapon in the most macho of sports: his advancing age. That's right, old age. For the past decade, experts have said Hopkins, who turns 49 in January, was too old to keep beating fighters who were 10 to 20 years his junior.
SPORTS
February 8, 1986 | By PHIL JASNER, Daily News Sports Writer
Old? On his way to his 10th consecutive NBA All-Star Game, his 15th straight as a pro, why, Julius Erving wonders, would anyone say that about him? Old? Why, he wondered, would anyone think that tomorrow, in Reunion Arena, would be where the string finally snaps? Old? Because he is 35? Because, on Feb. 22, he will turn 36? "That's interesting," Erving said, "because I won't even be the oldest guy there. Kareem (Abdul-Jabbar) and Artis (Gilmore) are older, yet the same focus doesn't seem to be on them.
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SPORTS
March 6, 2015 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
KISSIMMEE, Fla. - Cliff Lee wasn't sure what day it was yesterday, which wasn't a sign of a guy who just suffered a head injury but instead of a single-minded athlete who rarely considers what he's having for dinner that night, let alone the day of the week, or, a much broader view of the future. So it was a little weird, looking back, when he did just that 18 months ago. It was after his final start of the 2013 season, a game that was very much representative of Lee in his prime and of the Phillies in their nearly half-decade-long offensive funk.
SPORTS
August 27, 2014 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Staff Writer
WITH A FEW notable exceptions, pass rushing historically has been a young man's game. In the last three years, a total of 58 edge rushers - 4-3 defensive ends and 3-4 outside linebackers - have recorded 10 or more sacks in a season. Just seven of those 58 were 32 or older when they did it. Late Hall of Famer Reggie White put up 12 sacks at 34 and 11 at 36 and 16 at 37. Fellow Cantonite Bruce Smith had 84 sacks after his 32nd birthday. Kevin Greene recorded 15 sacks when he was 36 and 12 more when he was 37 before retiring.
SPORTS
October 25, 2013 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
IT'S NOT AS IF Bernard Hopkins needs any additional psychological advantages. In his quarter-century of boxing, the legendary Philadelphia champion has mastered the art of pushing just the right buttons to throw his opponent off edge. Hopkins can be irritating, and if he can talk his way into getting you angry enough to stray from your game plan, he will. He understands the intricacies of the mental warfare that has always been a part of boxing. Now, Mother Nature and Father Time have conspired to give Hopkins the ultimate psychological weapon in the most macho of sports: his advancing age. That's right, old age. For the past decade, experts have said Hopkins, who turns 49 in January, was too old to keep beating fighters who were 10 to 20 years his junior.
SPORTS
October 15, 2011 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
There were no more questions for Bernard Hopkins last week at the Joe Hand Boxing Gym on North Third Street after Hopkins had colorfully filibustered through a news conference before Saturday's WBC light-heavyweight world title defense against Chad Dawson in Los Angeles. Then Hopkins, who has a big stake in the pay-per-view promotion, realized one question hadn't been asked. Why watch the fight? Sure, the 46-year-old keeps making history after becoming the oldest fighter to win a major world title.
SPORTS
December 1, 2010 | By BERNARD FERNANDEZ, fernanb@phillynews.com
Bernard Hopkins isn't likely to be your favorite fighter if you prefer Lady Gaga to Diana Ross, Sam Bradford to Brett Favre, Lindsay Lohan to Hayley Mills or Buster Posey to Willie Mays. In a society still marked by all sort of divisions, Philadelphia's sole remaining boxing icon, who turns 46 on Jan. 15, has settled comfortably into the role of unofficial spokesman for athletes of a certain age, a club with an understandably shrinking membership. "Brett Favre got old," B-Hop noted yesterday at an open-to-the-media workout at the Joe Hand Boxing Gym in Northern Liberties when asked about the dramatically decreased productivity of the Minnesota Vikings' 41-year-old quarterback.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2006 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
AS INDEPENDENCE Month comes to a close - and the controversy over "the American Way" being deleted from "Superman Returns" still simmers - it is worth asking whether there are any patriotic heroes left in comics. Of course there is the Man of Steel, although patriotism has been downplayed lately. There is also Captain America, but his status as a symbol of America has not really been explored in his book recently (that's a subject for another column). But a book exploring the complexities and realities of the American dream is "Uncle Sam and the Freedom Fighters.
NEWS
December 31, 2004 | By Janice Jakubowitcz
It is New Year's Eve. Some of us are getting out our party shoes; others are planning a quiet evening at home. As usual, I'll be hosting a small gathering with family and friends, safely away from crowds, costly restaurant parties and drunken drivers. The television will be on at 11:55 p.m. for our ritual - watching the ball fall at Times Square. There is another ritual for me, and many thousands of other people, each New Year's Eve. I must decide whether to make resolutions or set goals for the coming year.
NEWS
November 21, 2003 | By Keith Herbert INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Conshohocken man who was convicted of involuntary manslaughter in the death of his infant son was sentenced yesterday to time served, about 14 months. Montgomery County Judge Richard Hodgson also gave Keith Walker five years' probation. Walker's 7-week-old son, Talyn Walker, died of injuries suffered in September 2002. He had 13 broken ribs and a brain hemorrhage, prosecutors said. In a bench trial last month, Hodgson found Walker, 30, formerly of Norristown, guilty of involuntary manslaughter.
SPORTS
August 13, 2002 | By Kevin Tatum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When he was 17 and growing up in Chester, Wilmer Woodland was forbidden to box after his mother found out that he had sneaked off and won three amateur fights. When Woodland brought up the subject again recently, hoping that his mother had changed her mind, 88-year-old Emma Johnson gave in. "He's old enough now," she said. Woodland is 71. "I first got the idea when I was 60," said the longtime Philadelphia resident, who now lives in Cape May. "If I don't do it now - I can't do it in five years.
LIVING
December 30, 1998 | By W. Speers This report includes material from the Associated Press, New York Post, New York Daily News and USA Today
The only son of ailing Joe DiMaggio has informed the family that he'll attend the baseball great's funeral but won't visit him in the hospital. Joe Jr., 57, and his dad have had a distant and mysterious relationship for decades. The bad feeling appears to have something to do with the son's resentment at living in the shadow of an American icon, while the old man disapproves of his boy's ways. After attending New Jersey's Lawrenceville School and Yale, then doing a stretch in the Marines, Joe Jr. has spent most of his life drifting out west in a trailer.
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