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NEWS
October 26, 1989 | By Robert J. Terry and Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writers
Joseph "JoJo" Rhone, a reputed member of the old Black Mafia who jumped bail in 1976 while awaiting trial on a murder charge and had been on the lam ever since, was arrested yesterday in South Philadelphia, police said. At 3:35 a.m., FBI agents and Philadelphia police found Rhone asleep on a sofa in a house in the 2000 block of Watkins Street - just a half-block from his old address on 20th Street, police said. Rhone did not resist arrest, police said, adding that a loaded gun was found in the house.
NEWS
November 27, 2012
LOS ANGELES - A murder suspect on the FBI's most wanted list gained weight and switched identities to evade authorities for 14 years, but his notoriety and a $100,000 reward finally led to his capture, the agency said Monday. Jose "Joe" Luis Saenz was arrested in Guadalajara, Mexico, on Thursday on suspicion of four murders and remained jailed in Southern California, the FBI said. Saenz, 37, a former East Los Angeles gang member who once went by the nicknames "Peanut Joe" and "Zapp," had been a fugitive since being suspected of two Los Angeles killings in 1998.
NEWS
January 21, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Michael S. Wirtz
In appreciation for the return of a rare Civil War flag that had been stolen, a group of African American soldiers yesterday presented the FBI with a miniature buffalo soldier. Authorities last week recovered the battle flag of the 12th Regiment Corps d'Afrique, whose members included many former slaves. The flag, one of only five known to have survived from black Civil War units, was stolen in the mid-1970s.
NEWS
March 5, 1987
The conventional wisdom is that CIA director-designate William H. Webster is a pro who not only knows the intelligence game from his nearly completed tenure as FBI chief, but who also can be trusted to keep the CIA honest. He came to the FBI when it was in trouble nine years ago, restoring the credibility it had squandered dogging political dissidents and noisy civil rights advocates. There's no reason to think he won't bring sensible restraint to a post-Casey CIA, as well, although getting firm control over the agency's well-entrenched bureaucracy won't be easy.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | By Lenny Savino and Roxanne Stites INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The FBI will be asking the questions when Rep. Gary A. Condit (D., Calif.) is next interviewed about Chandra Levy, the missing intern with whom he reportedly had an affair, law enforcement officials close to the case said yesterday. The FBI yesterday also renewed the questioning of residents of the apartment building from which Levy disappeared May 1, reported a resident who asked not to be identified. Washington's Metropolitan Police Department questioned the residents earlier.
NEWS
June 17, 1988
In 1980, the FBI and Frank Varelli, a former Salvadoran evangelist, found each other in Dallas. Exactly who ended up using whom is hard to figure. But what the combination spawned is clear: It got the FBI back into the bad old business of spying on law-abiding citizens who happened to disagree with their government. Mr. Varelli supplied - concocted, he says now - information that peace groups protesting U.S. policy in Central America were part of a terrorist network whose reach extended to members of Congress, liberal Roman Catholic bishops and a former U.S. ambassador to El Salvador.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2005 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The FBI is investigating the collapse of a Bucks County equipment-leasing firm in 2003 amid charges of accounting irregularities. U.S. District Judge Legrome Davis suspended civil lawsuits against former officers and directors of DVI Inc. for 120 days on May 31 "pending completion of the ongoing investigation" by the Justice Department. The U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia had asked for the stay so the FBI could interview principals in the case before they were questioned under oath in the civil cases, an FBI spokeswoman said.
NEWS
December 17, 1996 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
Vernon Dunn, wanted by the FBI for his alleged part in a $3 million cocaine ring, was standing by a car in an East Falls gas station Sunday night when three gunman walked up from behind and started blasting away. Three of the bullets apparently hit Dunn, and another struck the hand of a 14-year-old girl sitting in the car. A 1-year-old boy and 16-year-old girl, also in the car, weren't hit. Dunn, 28, jumped into the car and sped away, and yesterday police and the FBI were asking the public's help in finding him. Philadelphia Police Detective Jim Coughlin gave this account: Shortly before 10 p.m., Dunn was standing next to the car at the gas station at Fox and Abbottsford streets.
NEWS
July 16, 2004 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Missing files. Improperly notarized documents. Applications whisked through with dispatch - for those with political juice. Such were some of the problems at Philadelphia's Minority Business Enterprise Council, according to an audit released yesterday by City Controller Jonathan A. Saidel. The report comes as the minority council has emerged as an area of interest to the FBI in the ongoing investigation into possible corruption in city government. In a raid at the agency last October, the FBI seized some files and left behind a subpoena seeking other information about city contracts.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
An FBI agent testified yesterday during the extortion trial of former Philadelphia police Officer Joseph W. McCook that he would have urged federal officials not to prosecute McCook - if McCook had agreed to cooperate in the federal investigation focusing on Roofers Union Local 30-30B. The testimony by Special Agent Quinn John Tamm Jr. came on the first day of the trial of McCook, 47. McCook was indicted in November on charges that he used his position as a police officer and his wife's position as a Municipal Court bail commissioner to obtain $500 from Roofers Union leader Stephen J. Traitz Jr. and Traitz' son in late 1985.
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NEWS
July 14, 2016
ISSUE | CLINTON EMAILS FBI backs up lack of 'gross negligence' Commentary writer George Parry concluded that Hillary Clinton committed a crime of "gross negligence" in the handling of her emails while she was secretary of state ("Well-executed sleight of hand in letting Clinton off the hook," Friday). But here are three facts that undermine his conclusion: Secretary Clinton has said repeatedly that she never received or sent any emails that were marked with any level of classified status.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Sol Wachtler, a former chief judge of New York State, once famously remarked that prosecutors have so much influence, they could get a grand jury to "indict a ham sandwich. " If so, why did FBI director James Comey decline to recommend criminal charges against former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who sent and received classified documents on an unauthorized personal server, potentially exposing sensitive intelligence to foreign hackers? The answer is that in most cases, it's a judgment call and evidence of a crime is only one factor in the decision.
NEWS
July 9, 2016
By George Parry As a criminal defense lawyer who has been forced by unfortunate circumstances to champion any number of hopeless causes, I wish to express my professional admiration for FBI Director James Comey's creative and, dare I say it, "Clintonian" public exoneration of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. The FBI investigated Clinton for possible violations of a criminal statute that makes it a felony for anyone lawfully possessing information pertaining to the national defense to allow it, through "gross negligence," to be removed from its proper place of custody and disclosed.
NEWS
July 8, 2016
SOME PEOPLE seem to think that I actually matter. They message me in response to a particular column with either angry criticism or "atta girl!" euphoria, assuming that whatever I've written will have some impact on other readers. I am often amused by these emails, because the truth of the matter is that I can't even cajole my 7-year-old nephew to stop sticking french fries in the dog's nostrils. Clearly, my persuasive heft isn't all that hefty. And yet, after my most recent foray into politics where I mentioned that I'd probably vote for Donald Trump if no viable alternative presented itself, dozens of readers begged me to stop writing such ridiculous and/or dangerous and/or lunatic things.
NEWS
July 7, 2016
Discretion within reason is acceptable in law enforcement. But while few complain when leniency is afforded ordinary people accused of minor crimes, there will be many critics of the FBI's decision Tuesday not to recommend prosecution of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton for carelessly handling top-secret emails when she was secretary of state. Using his favorite medium for mass communication, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump tweeted, "FBI director said Crooked Hillary compromised our national security.
NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Solomon Jones
THE POLITICALLY charged FBI investigation of presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's email practices has ended with a recommendation that no criminal charges be filed against her. In my view, it's the right recommendation, since the FBI found no proof of criminality in Clinton's use of a private email server for official business while she was secretary of state. However, as FBI director James Comey rightly said regarding eight Clinton email chains on top-secret matters, "any reasonable person in Secretary Clinton's position . . . should have known that an unclassified system was no place for that conversation.
NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
An alleged serial bank robber nicknamed by authorities the "Straw Hat Bandit" struck again Saturday in Montgomery County, authorities said. Around 10:10 a.m., the man - who concealed his appearance with a tan hat and a makeshift mask of fabric with eyeholes - robbed the PNC bank at 1216 Welsh Rd. in North Wales, the FBI said in a statement. After brandishing a black semiautomatic handgun and ordering customers to the floor, he demanded money from tellers, then fled on foot after receiving an undisclosed amount of cash.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By David O'Reilly and Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITERS
The weary farmboy who once graced the cover of the Saturday Evening Post might sleep forever, but not the FBI. On Thursday - 40 years since Norman Rockwell's painting Taking a Break was stolen from a Cherry Hill home - the bureau's Art Crime Team issued a new appeal for any information related to the theft. It was one of several items taken during a June 30, 1976, break-in at the home of Robert and Teresa Grant, according to the FBI. The bureau and the Cherry Hill Police Department say they are still seeking leads, Also known as Lazybones , the 25-by-28-inch oil was featured on the cover of the Sept.
NEWS
July 1, 2016 | By Janaki Chadha, Staff Writer
The FBI is asking the public's help in finding a bandit believed responsible for 10 armed bank robberies in Montgomery and Bucks Counties between 2012 and 2015. The suspect, described as a white male in his 50s, about 6 feet tall, with a stocky build, concealed his face with a bandanna, mask, or pillowcase, and often wore hooded sweatshirts, suit coats, and hats. The first robbery took place in Horsham, the last in Dresher. In several stickups, the robber threatened tellers with a black semiautomatic handgun and may have driven a light-blue BMW. The FBI urges anyone with information to call 215-418-4000.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Steve Bohnel, Staff Writer
IN WILLIAM J. O'BRIEN'S eyes, the U.S. government and members of the FBI are a bunch of "liars" and "bullies" who have charged him with drug-related offenses for no legitimate reason. But to Assistant U.S. Attorney Mary Beth Leahy and her colleagues, O'Brien is a doctor who conspired with the Pagans Motorcycle Club to deal drugs, trade pills for oral sex, and write multiple prescriptions without any type of medical standard or diagnosis. These were the main points in closing arguments in a trial in which O'Brien, who has acted as his own attorney, is accused of 14 counts of drug and related charges, stemming from a "pill mill" he allegedly ran with the motorcycle club.
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