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NEWS
October 26, 1989 | By Robert J. Terry and Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writers
Joseph "JoJo" Rhone, a reputed member of the old Black Mafia who jumped bail in 1976 while awaiting trial on a murder charge and had been on the lam ever since, was arrested yesterday in South Philadelphia, police said. At 3:35 a.m., FBI agents and Philadelphia police found Rhone asleep on a sofa in a house in the 2000 block of Watkins Street - just a half-block from his old address on 20th Street, police said. Rhone did not resist arrest, police said, adding that a loaded gun was found in the house.
NEWS
November 27, 2012
LOS ANGELES - A murder suspect on the FBI's most wanted list gained weight and switched identities to evade authorities for 14 years, but his notoriety and a $100,000 reward finally led to his capture, the agency said Monday. Jose "Joe" Luis Saenz was arrested in Guadalajara, Mexico, on Thursday on suspicion of four murders and remained jailed in Southern California, the FBI said. Saenz, 37, a former East Los Angeles gang member who once went by the nicknames "Peanut Joe" and "Zapp," had been a fugitive since being suspected of two Los Angeles killings in 1998.
NEWS
January 21, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Michael S. Wirtz
In appreciation for the return of a rare Civil War flag that had been stolen, a group of African American soldiers yesterday presented the FBI with a miniature buffalo soldier. Authorities last week recovered the battle flag of the 12th Regiment Corps d'Afrique, whose members included many former slaves. The flag, one of only five known to have survived from black Civil War units, was stolen in the mid-1970s.
NEWS
March 5, 1987
The conventional wisdom is that CIA director-designate William H. Webster is a pro who not only knows the intelligence game from his nearly completed tenure as FBI chief, but who also can be trusted to keep the CIA honest. He came to the FBI when it was in trouble nine years ago, restoring the credibility it had squandered dogging political dissidents and noisy civil rights advocates. There's no reason to think he won't bring sensible restraint to a post-Casey CIA, as well, although getting firm control over the agency's well-entrenched bureaucracy won't be easy.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | By Lenny Savino and Roxanne Stites INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The FBI will be asking the questions when Rep. Gary A. Condit (D., Calif.) is next interviewed about Chandra Levy, the missing intern with whom he reportedly had an affair, law enforcement officials close to the case said yesterday. The FBI yesterday also renewed the questioning of residents of the apartment building from which Levy disappeared May 1, reported a resident who asked not to be identified. Washington's Metropolitan Police Department questioned the residents earlier.
NEWS
June 17, 1988
In 1980, the FBI and Frank Varelli, a former Salvadoran evangelist, found each other in Dallas. Exactly who ended up using whom is hard to figure. But what the combination spawned is clear: It got the FBI back into the bad old business of spying on law-abiding citizens who happened to disagree with their government. Mr. Varelli supplied - concocted, he says now - information that peace groups protesting U.S. policy in Central America were part of a terrorist network whose reach extended to members of Congress, liberal Roman Catholic bishops and a former U.S. ambassador to El Salvador.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2005 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The FBI is investigating the collapse of a Bucks County equipment-leasing firm in 2003 amid charges of accounting irregularities. U.S. District Judge Legrome Davis suspended civil lawsuits against former officers and directors of DVI Inc. for 120 days on May 31 "pending completion of the ongoing investigation" by the Justice Department. The U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia had asked for the stay so the FBI could interview principals in the case before they were questioned under oath in the civil cases, an FBI spokeswoman said.
NEWS
December 17, 1996 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
Vernon Dunn, wanted by the FBI for his alleged part in a $3 million cocaine ring, was standing by a car in an East Falls gas station Sunday night when three gunman walked up from behind and started blasting away. Three of the bullets apparently hit Dunn, and another struck the hand of a 14-year-old girl sitting in the car. A 1-year-old boy and 16-year-old girl, also in the car, weren't hit. Dunn, 28, jumped into the car and sped away, and yesterday police and the FBI were asking the public's help in finding him. Philadelphia Police Detective Jim Coughlin gave this account: Shortly before 10 p.m., Dunn was standing next to the car at the gas station at Fox and Abbottsford streets.
NEWS
July 16, 2004 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Missing files. Improperly notarized documents. Applications whisked through with dispatch - for those with political juice. Such were some of the problems at Philadelphia's Minority Business Enterprise Council, according to an audit released yesterday by City Controller Jonathan A. Saidel. The report comes as the minority council has emerged as an area of interest to the FBI in the ongoing investigation into possible corruption in city government. In a raid at the agency last October, the FBI seized some files and left behind a subpoena seeking other information about city contracts.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
An FBI agent testified yesterday during the extortion trial of former Philadelphia police Officer Joseph W. McCook that he would have urged federal officials not to prosecute McCook - if McCook had agreed to cooperate in the federal investigation focusing on Roofers Union Local 30-30B. The testimony by Special Agent Quinn John Tamm Jr. came on the first day of the trial of McCook, 47. McCook was indicted in November on charges that he used his position as a police officer and his wife's position as a Municipal Court bail commissioner to obtain $500 from Roofers Union leader Stephen J. Traitz Jr. and Traitz' son in late 1985.
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NEWS
August 26, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The FBI is searching for two Maryland teenagers who law enforcement officials say disappeared under suspicious circumstances this month. Authorities said Jesse Grant Veasey Jr., 16, and Ricardo Eugene Levenberry, 19, both of Elkton, may have been taken across state lines and are asking for the public's help in locating them. Veasey and Levenberry disappeared about a day apart, Veasey on Aug. 18 and Levenberry on Aug. 19. Both were last seen getting into a blue four-door Chevrolet in Elkton's Hollingsworth Manor neighborhood.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
James P. Mallon Jr., 66, an FBI agent in Atlantic City who later was a co-owner of a private investigations firm in Ocean City, N.J., died of cancer Friday, Aug. 15, at AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center in Atlantic City. "In 1981, the FBI increased its staffing of the Organized Crime program in Atlantic City" and brought Mr. Mallon in from its Detroit office, said his former FBI partner James Darcy. The concern was the influence of Philadelphia mob boss Nicodemo Scarfo in the growing casino industry, Darcy said.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four people who have had adversarial dealings with a West Oak Lane nonprofit founded by State Rep. Dwight Evans say they have been interviewed by the FBI about the agency, Ogontz Avenue Revitalization Corp. The earliest reported contact was in November. The most recent was within the last two months. Those interviewed say federal agents asked specific questions about their interactions with the OARC, but there was a suggestion that their interest was broader. "They indicated they were investigating multiple things, but they did not reveal what those were," said one of those interviewed, Peter Meadow, a California lawyer who represented a client, Sadiki Travick, in a contract dispute with OARC.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Along West Diamond Street about noon Thursday, FBI officers laid out hazmat suits and jars of fingerprint dust. The only thing under investigation, however, was whether they could beat the Strawberry Mansion All-Star Baseball League in a softball game. The feds and the young ballplayers have been challenging each other for the last eight summers in an effort to make city children more comfortable around the authorities. "It was really designed to kill the stigma between kids and law enforcement," said Derrick Ford, founder and head of the Strawberry Mansion All-Star Baseball League.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
A huge black truck with government plates blocked one side of the alley in Camden. A towering red tarpaulin covered the other. In the middle, the FBI and Camden County investigators were at work. Using gloves, helmets, and an excavator, they scoured the alley and searched a basement near North Third and Erie Streets in the city's Cooper's Poynt neighborhood. What, if anything, authorities found remained unknown Tuesday. But a law enforcement source said the operation, led by Camden County authorities, was tied to a decade-old cold case.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The lawyer handling a defamation suit against The Inquirer filed by Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice Seamus P. McCaffery and his wife told a judge Tuesday that the FBI had "cleared his client," according to a published report. On Tuesday, the Legal Intelligencer's website attributed the statement to Dion G. Rassius. His comment came during a Common Pleas Court hearing on the newspaper's preliminary objections to the lawsuit. It was unclear what the FBI investigation involved. According to the Legal Intelligencer, Rassius said the probe resulted from an Inquirer series on McCaffery and wife Lise Rapaport.
NEWS
June 25, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
FBI agents raided a Fairhill mental health clinic Monday, two months after a former employee sued, claiming she was fired for questioning what she described as fraudulent Medicaid billing. In April, Sheree Brown of Yeadon sued Juniata Community Mental Health Clinic, claiming its administrator, Sandy Acosta, and director, Carlos Matos, who is also a Democratic ward leader in Kensington, pushed her out of a job last year after she voiced her concerns. Federal authorities would not say whether their search of the practice, at 2637 N. Fifth St., was tied to Brown's allegations.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
WHILE ATTORNEYS for men connected to the Jerry Sandusky case advocated for their clients' reputations in a City Hall courtroom yesterday, veterans without jobs or housing fought in a very different way for their reputations at a Veterans Resource Fair six floors below in City Hall's courtyard. The sounds of former soldiers looking for work carried up those six floors and into the fancy courtroom, at times drowning out the voices of lawyers for former Penn State University president Graham Spanier and former FBI director Louis Freeh.
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
TULLYTOWN The FBI has cleared Tullytown police of any wrongdoing for using a Taser on a handcuffed teenager who tried to run away after being arrested on shoplifting charges last year, the Police Department said this week. The incident, which occurred in November at a Walmart store, received widespread attention after an image of the 14-year-old boy's facial injuries was widely circulated on the Internet. The Bucks County District Attorney's Office and the FBI investigated the incident to review the department's use of force.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
An attorney for Gov. Christie's former campaign manager disclosed in a court filing Monday that federal authorities are investigating his client as part of a probe into September lane closures on the George Washington Bridge. Bill Stepien "is undeniably a subject, if not a target" of the U.S. Attorney's Office's investigation into the traffic jams, attorney Kevin Marino wrote in a brief filed with Superior Court in Trenton. The brief says a subpoena issued by a special legislative committee investigating the traffic jams - which were carried out by Christie allies, allegedly for political payback - violates Stepien's Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination.
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