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NEWS
October 26, 1989 | By Robert J. Terry and Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writers
Joseph "JoJo" Rhone, a reputed member of the old Black Mafia who jumped bail in 1976 while awaiting trial on a murder charge and had been on the lam ever since, was arrested yesterday in South Philadelphia, police said. At 3:35 a.m., FBI agents and Philadelphia police found Rhone asleep on a sofa in a house in the 2000 block of Watkins Street - just a half-block from his old address on 20th Street, police said. Rhone did not resist arrest, police said, adding that a loaded gun was found in the house.
NEWS
November 27, 2012
LOS ANGELES - A murder suspect on the FBI's most wanted list gained weight and switched identities to evade authorities for 14 years, but his notoriety and a $100,000 reward finally led to his capture, the agency said Monday. Jose "Joe" Luis Saenz was arrested in Guadalajara, Mexico, on Thursday on suspicion of four murders and remained jailed in Southern California, the FBI said. Saenz, 37, a former East Los Angeles gang member who once went by the nicknames "Peanut Joe" and "Zapp," had been a fugitive since being suspected of two Los Angeles killings in 1998.
NEWS
January 21, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Michael S. Wirtz
In appreciation for the return of a rare Civil War flag that had been stolen, a group of African American soldiers yesterday presented the FBI with a miniature buffalo soldier. Authorities last week recovered the battle flag of the 12th Regiment Corps d'Afrique, whose members included many former slaves. The flag, one of only five known to have survived from black Civil War units, was stolen in the mid-1970s.
NEWS
March 5, 1987
The conventional wisdom is that CIA director-designate William H. Webster is a pro who not only knows the intelligence game from his nearly completed tenure as FBI chief, but who also can be trusted to keep the CIA honest. He came to the FBI when it was in trouble nine years ago, restoring the credibility it had squandered dogging political dissidents and noisy civil rights advocates. There's no reason to think he won't bring sensible restraint to a post-Casey CIA, as well, although getting firm control over the agency's well-entrenched bureaucracy won't be easy.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | By Lenny Savino and Roxanne Stites INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The FBI will be asking the questions when Rep. Gary A. Condit (D., Calif.) is next interviewed about Chandra Levy, the missing intern with whom he reportedly had an affair, law enforcement officials close to the case said yesterday. The FBI yesterday also renewed the questioning of residents of the apartment building from which Levy disappeared May 1, reported a resident who asked not to be identified. Washington's Metropolitan Police Department questioned the residents earlier.
NEWS
June 17, 1988
In 1980, the FBI and Frank Varelli, a former Salvadoran evangelist, found each other in Dallas. Exactly who ended up using whom is hard to figure. But what the combination spawned is clear: It got the FBI back into the bad old business of spying on law-abiding citizens who happened to disagree with their government. Mr. Varelli supplied - concocted, he says now - information that peace groups protesting U.S. policy in Central America were part of a terrorist network whose reach extended to members of Congress, liberal Roman Catholic bishops and a former U.S. ambassador to El Salvador.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2005 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The FBI is investigating the collapse of a Bucks County equipment-leasing firm in 2003 amid charges of accounting irregularities. U.S. District Judge Legrome Davis suspended civil lawsuits against former officers and directors of DVI Inc. for 120 days on May 31 "pending completion of the ongoing investigation" by the Justice Department. The U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia had asked for the stay so the FBI could interview principals in the case before they were questioned under oath in the civil cases, an FBI spokeswoman said.
NEWS
December 17, 1996 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
Vernon Dunn, wanted by the FBI for his alleged part in a $3 million cocaine ring, was standing by a car in an East Falls gas station Sunday night when three gunman walked up from behind and started blasting away. Three of the bullets apparently hit Dunn, and another struck the hand of a 14-year-old girl sitting in the car. A 1-year-old boy and 16-year-old girl, also in the car, weren't hit. Dunn, 28, jumped into the car and sped away, and yesterday police and the FBI were asking the public's help in finding him. Philadelphia Police Detective Jim Coughlin gave this account: Shortly before 10 p.m., Dunn was standing next to the car at the gas station at Fox and Abbottsford streets.
NEWS
July 16, 2004 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Missing files. Improperly notarized documents. Applications whisked through with dispatch - for those with political juice. Such were some of the problems at Philadelphia's Minority Business Enterprise Council, according to an audit released yesterday by City Controller Jonathan A. Saidel. The report comes as the minority council has emerged as an area of interest to the FBI in the ongoing investigation into possible corruption in city government. In a raid at the agency last October, the FBI seized some files and left behind a subpoena seeking other information about city contracts.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
An FBI agent testified yesterday during the extortion trial of former Philadelphia police Officer Joseph W. McCook that he would have urged federal officials not to prosecute McCook - if McCook had agreed to cooperate in the federal investigation focusing on Roofers Union Local 30-30B. The testimony by Special Agent Quinn John Tamm Jr. came on the first day of the trial of McCook, 47. McCook was indicted in November on charges that he used his position as a police officer and his wife's position as a Municipal Court bail commissioner to obtain $500 from Roofers Union leader Stephen J. Traitz Jr. and Traitz' son in late 1985.
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NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
Even as she contends with state criminal charges, Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane is also facing scrutiny by the FBI, The Inquirer has learned. In recent months, agents have questioned at least three people about several issues, including Kane's role in negotiating a new contract with the union representing narcotics agents in her office, according to people familiar with the matter. The agents sought information about whether Kane suggested to union officials that she would look favorably on their contract if they supported her embattled chief of staff, sources said.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe and Cat Coyle, Inquirer Staff Writers
The body of an unidentified male was found Wednesday in Delaware County, the FBI said, not far from where a missing 11-year-old was last seen. However, the agency would not confirm whether the body discovered in Prospect Park was that of the missing boy. He was last seen riding his bicycle Monday in nearby Folcroft. Folcroft police declined to comment. The FBI said Laquan "Quan" Lattimore, a student at Sharon Hill Elementary School, was possibly with a group of children when he was last spotted in the area of King Avenue and Chester Pike about 3 p.m. Monday.
NEWS
August 5, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The next person to lead the FBI's regional office is a Philadelphia native with a Villanova University degree, and a background in public corruption and terrorism investigations. William F. Sweeney Jr. was named special agent in charge of the bureau's Philadelphia division last this month. He began his new job Monday, replacing Edward J. Hanko, who retired after two years in the post and 29 with the bureau. A 17-year veteran of the bureau, Sweeney started his career in 1998 in Newark, N.J., where he directed an investigation that led to the bribery conviction in 2002 of Robert C. Janiszewski, an influential state Democrat and Hudson County executive who wore a wire to bring down several former associates.
NEWS
August 5, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward J. Hanko, special agent in charge of the FBI's Philadelphia office, still smarts when he remembers a federal jury's rejection of the corruption case his agents had spent years building against six narcotics officers. "That one hurt," he said, recalling the day in May when the verdict was read. The case had been particularly hard-fought. Lawyers for the indicted officers had challenged the competence of Hanko's agents and accused them of ignoring justice for the sake of an indictment.
NEWS
July 12, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
FBI agents descended Friday on Reading City Hall - their second such raid on a Pennsylvania municipal building in as many weeks. Nearly a dozen investigators spent nearly three hours copying contracts and hauling boxes of documents and computer equipment from the offices of Mayor Vaughn Spencer, the city council, and other departments. By afternoon, they had moved on to Spencer's house and spent several hours there. The Berks County raid came eight days after agents conducted a similar sweep through Allentown City Hall, also looking for information on municipal contracts.
NEWS
July 8, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari and Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writers
WASHINGTON - Allentown Mayor Ed Pawlowski suspended his campaign for the Senate on Monday, four days after FBI agents executed search warrants at Allentown City Hall. In a statement, Pawlowski said he was pausing the campaign "to fully focus on assisting in the federal investigation of Allentown contracting practices both prior to his being elected and since. " He said he would reevaluate when he had a clearer picture of the investigation. The news came after agents raided the office Thursday, seized documents, and interviewed Pawlowski and city Managing Director Francis Dougherty, according to a source close to the investigation.
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward J. Hanko, the FBI's top agent in Philadelphia, will retire next month after a 29-year career with the bureau, he announced to agents Tuesday. The Wilkes-Barre native has led the Philadelphia division - the bureau's eighth-largest office - since 2013, and oversaw an investigative force with an expanded focus on counterterrorism, cyber crime and public corruption probes. In an e-mail to colleagues, Hanko, 55, said he had accepted a position as "vice president [for] global security for a Fortune 500 company" and would leave his current post July 31 - two years short of the FBI's mandatory retirement age. Hanko did not respond to calls for comment Tuesday about his future position or his retirement, which had not been officially announced by the bureau.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a surgical device spread an aggressive but undetected uterine cancer inside anesthesiologist Amy Reed in late 2013, she and her husband launched a campaign to ban electric morcellators. Now, the Federal Bureau of Investigation has gotten involved, according to Reed's husband, Philadelphia heart surgeon Hooman Noorchashm, and Sarah Robinson, a California woman whose cancer was also worsened by the device. Both said Wednesday that they have been interviewed by FBI agents, and believe the FBI is looking into whether manufacturers failed to report deaths and serious injuries to the Food and Drug Administration, as required by federal law. "I had been trying to get the FBI's attention for a very long time," said Noorchashm, a heart surgeon at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
NEWS
May 13, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before DNA testing became the gold standard in forensic science, hair analysis was often a prosecutor's trump card. Developed by the FBI's vaunted crime lab, microscopic hair analysis - comparing a hair found at a crime scene with one from a criminal defendant - as described in polished, confident testimony by an FBI hair analyst, could seal a guilty verdict. Now, an ongoing FBI hair-analysis review - preliminary results were announced April 20 - recommends a wholesale look at cases in which testimony about microscopic hair analysis contributed to a guilty verdict.
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
AS 40,000 RUNNERS barreled down Broad Street, four law-enforcement officials were in a race of their own. The prize was more than a medal and bragging rights - it was a man's life. FBI Special Agents Erik Negron, Tom Powell and Brian Hoffman, as well as Philadelphia Police Officer Matthew Fleming, took action Sunday morning during the Broad Street Run, working together to revive a 35-year-old man, one of two runners who had gone into cardiac arrest, authorities said last night. It happened in a split-second, according to Special Agent J.J. Klaver, an FBI spokesman.
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