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Fbi Agent

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NEWS
May 13, 1989 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
An FBI wiretap - aimed at a drug network whose members mostly spoke Spanish - led yesterday to the arrest of 13 alleged cocaine dealers who used the phone line to discuss their trade. Five other defendants were being sought and a sixth, Michael Black, 27, of Washington Lane near Anderson Street, a reputed member of the Junior Black Mafia, already is in prison awaiting trial for murder. All 19 were charged in a 68-count indictment unsealed yesterday. According to the indictment, the 19 defendants discussed selling and buying cocaine from each other, the availablility and the price of the drug, and planned deliveries of large quantities of cocaine.
NEWS
June 12, 1996 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Alan I. "Rudy" Cohen, a marijuana dealer for more than 20 years, says he couldn't look the suspected drug dealer in the eyes, not after helping bust the man. So Cohen got out of the Mercedes-Benz before the FBI agent and the drug dealer pulled guns and shot each other at a hotel parking lot in Old City last March. After the smoke cleared, FBI agent Charles Reed, 45, and the drug dealer, 24-year old Jonathan Cramer, lay dead or dying. And Rudy Cohen's belated role as a snitch - which he hoped would help him avoid a long prison term for trafficking in a ton of marijuana - was suddenly blown.
NEWS
March 28, 1996 | by Marisol Bello, Daily News Staff Writer
Footsteps of the marchers echoed on the two-lane country road. State troopers, city and transit cops, even park rangers, marched solemnly down the hill to the front of St. Mary's Catholic Church in Schwenksville, Montgomery County, where the body of slain FBI agent Charles L. Reed waited. Beside them, police cruisers, more than 300 in all, drove past, their emergency lights silently flashing. Hundreds of FBI agents in trenchcoats and sunglasses, their badges covered with black tape, filled the church parking lot in tribute to their fallen comrade, who was killed Friday in a shootout with a drug dealer.
NEWS
May 20, 1986 | By SCOTT HEIMER, Daily News Staff Writer
A 24-year-old Oak Lane man was arrested early today after he allegedly tried to rob an FBI agent who was walking his dog in the neighborhood, detectives said. The suspect, Anthony Bass, of Beverly Road near 74th Avenue, was charged with robbery, resisting arrest, weapons violations and related offenses. Detectives said Bass was riding a bicycle when he approached the FBI agent on 13th Street near Godfrey Avenue shortly after 5 a.m., pulled an automatic handgun and demanded the agent's wallet.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | By Mike Franolich and Carol Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
One FBI agent died yesterday and another was seriously injured after their bureau-owned car flipped over on the Race Track Circle in Cherry Hill late Wednesday night, officials said. Dennis Bozella, 31, of Kingston Lane in Mount Laurel, was pronounced dead of injuries at 5:27 a.m. yesterday at Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center, Camden, a hospital nursing supervisor said. Bozella joined the FBI in October 1984 and was assigned to its Philadelphia bureau, according to FBI special agent John H. Kundts, an agency spokesman.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | By Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
Federal authorities have found someone to blame in the May 13, 1985, bombing of MOVE headquarters that led to 11 deaths, including those of five children, and the destruction of 61 homes. FBI Special Agent Michael Macys, who gave plastic explosives to the Philadelphia police bomb squad more than four months before the squad used the explosives in the MOVE bombing, was suspended last week for 30 days without pay by high-level FBI officials in Washington, according to sources familiar with the suspension.
NEWS
July 27, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  For a 1986 story about changes in the Philadelphia mob, Inquirer reporter George Anastasia went to former FBI agent Gino Lazzari. "They're not as cautious as the older guys," Mr. Lazzari said of the newer generation. "They really don't give a damn. "They love to trade on that Godfather image. Hey, look at me. I'm a tough guy. " Mr. Lazzari spoke with authority, because for most of his years in the Philadelphia office of the FBI, he investigated organized crime.
NEWS
July 5, 1988 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Bob Warner contributed to this report
A 29-year-old FBI agent from Bucks County was arrested in Philadelphia yesterday in the shooting of his wife at a family gathering Sunday afternoon in suburban Pittsburgh. Bruno N. Bonanotte of Bensalem, assigned to the FBI's Newark, N.J., office, was arraigned last night on charges of attempted murder, aggravated assault and recklessly endangering another person. He was held in lieu of $250,000 bail and imprisoned at the Allegheny County Jail. Following his arrest yesterday morning in Northeast Philadelphia, he was arraigned, then transported to Allegheny County.
NEWS
April 28, 1986 | New York Daily News
A veteran FBI specialist in Soviet counterintelligence who worked in the bureau's computer center here is under investigation for selling government secrets, federal sources say. The agent, who had "access to everything," has been transferred from his sensitive high-clearance post inside headquarters to a desk job at the bureau's training facility in Quantico, Va., one source said. The investigation comes as former FBI agent Richard W. Miller is being tried in California on charges of selling secrets to convicted Soviet spy Svetlana Ogorodnikov.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1990 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
Firebird by James Carroll (Signet, $5.95) is not a homage to the great work by Igor Stravinsky, one of the century's musical giants, but refers instead to a Cold War Soviet code book. Yep, we're still back in the spy biz even as the Soviet Union goes where they haven't gone since 1917. Firebird tells of an atypically introspective FBI agent, in the Washington of 1951, who is chosen to steal that code book just before Joseph McCarthy and Ethel and Julius Rosenberg embark on their respective psychodramas.
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NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
James P. Mallon Jr., 66, an FBI agent in Atlantic City who later was a co-owner of a private investigations firm in Ocean City, N.J., died of cancer Friday, Aug. 15, at AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center in Atlantic City. "In 1981, the FBI increased its staffing of the Organized Crime program in Atlantic City" and brought Mr. Mallon in from its Detroit office, said his former FBI partner James Darcy. The concern was the influence of Philadelphia mob boss Nicodemo Scarfo in the growing casino industry, Darcy said.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A FEDERAL JUDGE yesterday denied bail to ex-narcotics cop Thomas Liciardello, finding evidence that he was the "de facto leader" of an alleged group of rogue cops, and that he could pose a danger to the community. After U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno ordered him held pending trial on racketeering-conspiracy and robbery charges, Liciardello, 38, looked back toward his wife, Selena, a Philly police officer, and mouthed: "Stay strong. " His wife, who shook as she sat in the gallery next to his mother and stepfather, later cried outside the courtroom.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Along West Diamond Street about noon Thursday, FBI officers laid out hazmat suits and jars of fingerprint dust. The only thing under investigation, however, was whether they could beat the Strawberry Mansion All-Star Baseball League in a softball game. The feds and the young ballplayers have been challenging each other for the last eight summers in an effort to make city children more comfortable around the authorities. "It was really designed to kill the stigma between kids and law enforcement," said Derrick Ford, founder and head of the Strawberry Mansion All-Star Baseball League.
NEWS
January 14, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the late 1960s, and their plan was to float a banner protesting the Vietnam War above JFK Stadium during the annual Army-Navy Game. So members of Philadelphia Resistance, an antiwar group, contacted William Davidon, an esteemed Haverford physics professor whose opposition to war equaled theirs. Davidon calculated how much helium the balloons needed. He added weights to keep the sign steady. And then he raided his university department's helium supply. On game day, Davidon and his friends gathered in the stadium parking lot and used ropes to guide the banner within view of the stands.
NEWS
January 8, 2014 | By Mark Wagenveld, For The Inquirer
John and Bonnie Raines had gathered for dinner with their three young children that Monday night in Germantown. When the babysitter arrived, the couple said goodbye to the children, climbed into their Ford wagon, and drove west, toward Media. For weeks, the Raineses and others had been studying a four-story building across from the Delaware County Courthouse. This was the night they had waited for. While millions were distracted by a championship boxing bout, the crew would pull off the unthinkable: They would break into an FBI office and gather proof that agents had been waging a secret war on political dissent.
NEWS
September 12, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JIM McINTOSH had a good day. Jim, a onetime Villanova basketball star, was an FBI agent who lectured sports teams, local and national, pro and amateur, on the dangers of illegal drugs. On this day in the summer of '86, he had a chance to reach athletes younger than he was used to, speaking at a basketball camp at St. Joseph's University for kids 9 to 17. After his talk, a 10-year-old boy came up and asked, "If somebody comes up to you asking for help who's on drugs, will he be put in jail or given help?"
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MIKE WALD was the consummate smooth operator. How else could this undercover FBI investigator convince a bunch of shrewd Philadelphia politicians that he represented an Arab sheik willing to make payoffs to get government favors? With a video camera peeking through a hole in the wall from an adjoining room at the Barclay Hotel, politicians, including three city councilmen, two congressmen and a lawyer, were caught accepting bundles of cash. The scandal was called Abscam, and it unfolded in the late 1970s and early '80s as a carefully plotted FBI undercover sting that made lurid headlines for years.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV CRITIC
A gritty six-part series, Inside the American Mob , chronicles the decline and fall of the Mafia from its apex of power and influence in the '70s to its virtual dismantlement two decades later. As the rub-out begins (with back-to-back episodes), the New York-based Five Families - Gambino, Colombo, Genovese, Lucchese, and Bonanno - have a vise-grip on their far-flung criminal enterprises. They use an organizational template devised by mob architect Lucky Luciano back in 1931.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By John P. Martin and Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writers
The men were apparently related, but they shared more than a family tie. Police said they were a tag-team of crime and violence, responsible for murder and robberies across the city. And they had vowed to resist arrest. As officers and FBI agents swarmed their East Mount Airy hangout early Monday afternoon, the suspects stormed from a back door with weapons drawn, police said. The ensuing gunfight near Musgrave Street seemed to last 10 minutes, a neighbor said. When it ended, 21-year-old Tevin Hammond was dead and 19-year-old Justin Mackie was severely wounded.
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