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Fbi Files

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NEWS
April 21, 1989 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Staff Writer
The FBI said Todd Patterson - a teenager compiling his own encyclopedia of the world - was too "unimportant" for their attention. But the secret FBI investigation file on the teenager kept on growing. It kept growing after the FBI knew he was only a student working on a school project, and now, Patterson's attorneys say, even after the teenager has sued the agency in a futile attempt to see his file. Yesterday, Frank Askin, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who represents Patterson, said the FBI added to the teenager's file as late as August 1988 - months after the lawsuit was filed.
NEWS
June 25, 1996 | BY CAL THOMAS
June 17 was the 24th anniversary of the break-in of Democratic National Committee headquarters at Washington's Watergate Hotel. It was an event that led to the discovery of much more wrongdoing in the Nixon administration and the first resignation of a president. Nixon's special counsel, Charles Colson, called to ask me if I remembered what got him a one-to-three-year prison sentence. "Something about Daniel Ellsberg's stealing of the Pentagon Papers and your involvement with obtaining records from his psychiatrist's office?"
NEWS
July 4, 1996 | By Angie Cannon, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It was a startling admission, but one that revealed much about the early days of the Clinton White House. House investigators recently asked former associate White House counsel William H. Kennedy 3d about efforts in 1993 to train Craig Livingstone for his new post as director of personnel security - a position that would allow him to review confidential FBI background files. "Craig had no experience in these matters. Neither did I, and so we engaged in OJT, on-the-job training," said Kennedy, who came to the White House from the Rose Law Firm in Little Rock, the same firm at which Hillary Rodham Clinton was a partner.
NEWS
June 23, 1996
It was a dismal week for the President who promised "the most ethical administration in the history of the Republic. " A Senate Whitewater report raked the Clintons over the coals. Prosecutors said they'd call a top presidential aide an "unindicted co-conspirator" in an Arkansas bank-fraud case. Hearings on Capitol Hill asked how - and why - the White House got its mitts on hundreds of FBI files on folks who served under Republicans. It's hard for citizens to sort it out because it seems so complex.
NEWS
July 5, 1996 | By E.J. DIONNE JR
There are two perfectly reasonable - and opposing - views of the Republicans' handling of the White House mess over those FBI files. I hold both of them. The first view is: Thank God the Republicans are raising holy hell over this by calling names, shouting indignation, hurling accusations. Of all the things the Clinton administration has been accused of, this is the really serious one. Messing around with FBI files is not only wrong. It's scary. Nobody wants former advance men (and now, it appears, White House interns)
NEWS
December 26, 1996 | By Alexander Charns
The day after Thanksgiving, the postman brought a 10-pound box to my law office. It was from the Federal Bureau of Investigation. I knew that inside the bulging cardboard were reams of paper created, studied, indexed and stored for as long as a half century. All of it was about the late Thurgood Marshall. I practice law in the areas of civil rights and criminal defense. Justice Marshall is one of my legal heroes. But I also write about the FBI and the Supreme Court. So I had bad feelings as I cut open the box to find some 1,300 pages of records.
NEWS
June 12, 1996
It sure looks awful. The Clinton White House had the confidential FBI files of hundreds of people who held White House passes during Republican administrations. The stash of files - the names ranged from a groundskeeper to a secretary of state - raises the specter of dirty tricks. Bob Dole has called the revelations "shocking" and "disturbing. " Yet as Republicans test-market the situation as a scandal and Clintonites contritely call it a bureaucratic mix-up, it will take time to be sure who's right.
NEWS
June 21, 1996 | By David Hess, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Attorney General Janet Reno washed her hands yesterday of the investigation into why White House security officials obtained confidential FBI files on former Republican presidential aides, handing over the probe to an independent counsel. As she moved to avoid what she called a potential "conflict of interest" by turning the matter over to Whitewater prosecutor Kenneth W. Starr, the Senate Judiciary Committee heard testimony from a Secret Service deputy casting doubt on a White House explanation of what happened.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | by Chris Brennan Daily News Staff Writer
Rabbi Fred Neulander was stymied yesterday in his attempt to open up the FBI files on Len Jenoff, the former private investigator who has confessed to the 1994 killing of the rabbi's wife. Neulander's attorney asked Judge Linda G. Baxter to order the FBI to release all its files on Jenoff, a one-time informant in Baltimore and Philadelphia. The FBI has offered some pages of the files but has withheld information that the agency says could give away secret investigation techniques or the identities of confidential informants.
NEWS
May 14, 1998 | By Ron Hutcheson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Newly released FBI files show the agency kept tabs on John F. Kennedy's sex life as far back as World War II, when the young naval officer had an affair with a suspected Nazi agent. Kennedy's wartime fling with Inga Fejos, which was captured on FBI surveillance tapes in 1942, was the first in a series of rumored dalliances that caught the attention of FBI director J. Edgar Hoover. The records regarding Kennedy's personal life were among 17,000 pages of documents made public yesterday by the National Archives.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | By Anthony McCartney, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - FBI files on Marilyn Monroe that could not be located earlier this year have been found and reissued, revealing the names of some of the movie star's communist-leaning friends who drew concern from government officials and her own entourage. The records, which previously had been heavily redacted, do not contain any new information about Monroe's death 50 years ago. Letters and news clippings included in the files show the bureau was aware of theories the actress had been killed, but they do not show that any effort was undertaken to investigate the claims.
NEWS
April 25, 2009 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The FBI memorandum describes a pattern of corruption among a group of Philadelphia narcotics officers: false information used to get search warrants, planted evidence and perjured testimony, thefts of drugs, cash, and valuables from dealers. It's called the Roberts report and, though it's nine years old, it deals with the same issues that a federal-city task force is now investigating. The report, written on Sept. 5, 2000, by FBI Agent John Roberts - now head of the FBI's public-corruption unit in Philadelphia - remains under seal by order of a federal judge and has never been made public.
NEWS
April 15, 2008 | By David King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Blanchett births her third boy Aussie actress Cate Blanchett has given birth to a 7-pound-9-ounce boy, announced a rep at the Sydney Theatre Company, where Blanchett and her husband, playwright Andrew Upton, are coartistic directors. Ignatius Martin Upton is the couple's third son, following Dashiell, 6, and Roman, 3. Kevin Rudd, Australia's prime minister, said in a statement that Blanchett will still cochair a panel on the arts this Saturday at the 2020 summit in Canberra, which is gathering more than 1,000 of Australia's best and brightest from many fields to propose ideas for the country's future.
SPORTS
March 3, 2008 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Hard-partying Green Bay Packers receiver Max McGee, who scored the first touchdown in Super Bowl history, had a gambling habit that the FBI tracked after his career ended, newly released records show. Agents investigated McGee for about a year, from late 1972 through September 1973, before dropping the case for lack of evidence, according to records released to the Associated Press under the federal Freedom of Information Act. Information in the late player's file appears to show the FBI thought he was a bookmaker but determined he was not, said I. Nelson Rose, a professor at Whittier Law School in Costa Mesa, Calif.
NEWS
April 25, 2004 | By Shannon McCaffrey INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As the FBI endures a bruising examination by the commission investigating the Sept. 11 attacks, the bureau's director is drawing positive reviews from commissioners both Republican and Democratic. Robert S. Mueller III has undertaken an aggressive one-man public relations offensive, lunching with commissioners, preaching institutional reform, and opening up many classified FBI files to panel investigators. Mueller is fighting critics who doubt the FBI is up to the task of domestic counterterrorism, who criticize the bureau as intractable and changing too sluggishly, and who think that a new intelligence-gathering agency - in the mold of Britain's MI-5 - is needed.
NEWS
July 20, 2003 | By Shannon McCaffrey INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The highest-ranking Arab American FBI agent has filed a discrimination lawsuit against the bureau alleging that he was excluded from the investigation into the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks and denied promotion because of his ethnicity. The agent, Bassem Youssef, said in legal papers filed in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia that the FBI's bias had created a "glass ceiling" for Arab American agents. His suit alleges that the agency's prejudices may be hindering terrorism investigations.
NEWS
June 20, 2001 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge ruled yesterday that Rabbi Fred J. Neulander is not entitled to have the FBI's complete file on Len Jenoff, a former private investigator and a key prosecution witness in the murder case against the rabbi. U.S. District Judge Joseph Irenas concluded that FBI officials had properly edited out a small part of Jenoff's 82-page file, compiled by the FBI in Philadelphia, that dealt with administrative matters considered classified information. "They acted strictly in accordance with the regulations," Irenas said.
NEWS
June 1, 2001 | By Larry Fish INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Timothy McVeigh, who had said he was prepared to die for the murders of 168 people in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, yesterday sought to postpone his date with the executioner. Lawyers in Denver, the scene of his 1997 trial, filed a request for a stay of execution because they said the government had perpetrated "a fraud upon the court" and made a fair trial impossible by not turning over thousands of pages of FBI documents to his defense. U.S. District Judge Richard Matsch, who presided over the original trial, scheduled a hearing for Wednesday morning to determine whether to order a delay and ordered prosecutors to respond by Monday evening.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The attorneys for Rabbi Fred J. Neulander have gone to federal court to try to force the FBI to turn over all unedited documents relating to former private investigator Len Jenoff, the state's key witness in the murder case against their client. The attorneys, Dennis Wixted and Jeffrey C. Zucker, have been seeking to learn more about Jenoff's role as an FBI informant in Philadelphia and Baltimore, and the FBI has turned over documents - but with portions blacked out. In March, Judge Linda G. Baxter of Superior Court in Camden County refused to order the FBI to turn over unredacted copies.
NEWS
April 14, 2001 | By Lenny Savino INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
FBI Director Louis J. Freeh has quietly established two new security practices that many experts believe could have exposed the activities of FBI spy suspect Robert Hanssen years before he was arrested. According to an internal memo obtained by The Inquirer's Washington Bureau, Freeh has ordered senior agents at headquarters and in the 56 field offices to tell the FBI's counterintelligence division if they are working on a case that might involve spying. Freeh also ordered the agents investigating those sensitive cases to begin checking who else is looking at the case files.
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