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Fbi

NEWS
September 5, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
A WEEK BEFORE she was arrested for allegedly kidnapping and sexually assaulting a 5-year-old girl, Christina Regusters didn't seem too nervous or upset, an FBI agent testified during her trial yesterday. On the contrary, Regusters joked a little, appeared immature at times and said some things that stood out, recalled FBI Special Agent Thomas Scanzano, who interviewed her Feb. 8, 2013. "To me, it was a very unemotional interview considering the facts of the case," he said, as Regusters, 21, busied herself shuffling legal papers while seated next to her lawyer.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Reports of a major data breach at JPMorgan and other banks - possibly by Russian hackers - puts in question the security of customer accounts. What's a consumer to do? Infosecurity magazine runs through the possible methods of the hackers and what the fallout might be. "The FBI has called the skill associated with the attack 'far beyond the capability of ordinary criminal hackers,' leading many to conclude that the action was state-sponsored," writes reporter Tara Seals. The cold implication: "Without significant change in strategy, ultimate resistance to high-level attacks is, well, futile.
NEWS
September 1, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writers
For a few months in 1966, the budding romance between film star George Hamilton and Lynda Bird Johnson, daughter of the 36th president, was the talk of Washington. Gossip columnists followed their every move as Hamilton squired her around town. The couple vacationed in Acapulco and made camera-ready appearances at the Sugar Bowl, Mardi Gras, and the Oscars. The actor spent Easter at the LBJ ranch in Texas and even attended the Washington wedding of Lynda's sister Luci. President Johnson made no secret of his suspicions about the handsome, patent-leather playboy, perhaps best known now for his perpetual tan, blinding smile, and roles on TV shows ranging from   Columbo to Dynasty to Dancing With the Stars . But a previously confidential FBI file - which a Philadelphia judge last week outlined in an opinion and ordered to be released - shows for the first time how far Johnson went to protect his daughter and his presidency.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The FBI is searching for two Maryland teenagers who law enforcement officials say disappeared under suspicious circumstances this month. Authorities said Jesse Grant Veasey Jr., 16, and Ricardo Eugene Levenberry, 19, both of Elkton, may have been taken across state lines and are asking for the public's help in locating them. Veasey and Levenberry disappeared about a day apart, Veasey on Aug. 18 and Levenberry on Aug. 19. Both were last seen getting into a blue four-door Chevrolet in Elkton's Hollingsworth Manor neighborhood.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
James P. Mallon Jr., 66, an FBI agent in Atlantic City who later was a co-owner of a private investigations firm in Ocean City, N.J., died of cancer Friday, Aug. 15, at AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center in Atlantic City. "In 1981, the FBI increased its staffing of the Organized Crime program in Atlantic City" and brought Mr. Mallon in from its Detroit office, said his former FBI partner James Darcy. The concern was the influence of Philadelphia mob boss Nicodemo Scarfo in the growing casino industry, Darcy said.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four people who have had adversarial dealings with a West Oak Lane nonprofit founded by State Rep. Dwight Evans say they have been interviewed by the FBI about the agency, Ogontz Avenue Revitalization Corp. The earliest reported contact was in November. The most recent was within the last two months. Those interviewed say federal agents asked specific questions about their interactions with the OARC, but there was a suggestion that their interest was broader. "They indicated they were investigating multiple things, but they did not reveal what those were," said one of those interviewed, Peter Meadow, a California lawyer who represented a client, Sadiki Travick, in a contract dispute with OARC.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Along West Diamond Street about noon Thursday, FBI officers laid out hazmat suits and jars of fingerprint dust. The only thing under investigation, however, was whether they could beat the Strawberry Mansion All-Star Baseball League in a softball game. The feds and the young ballplayers have been challenging each other for the last eight summers in an effort to make city children more comfortable around the authorities. "It was really designed to kill the stigma between kids and law enforcement," said Derrick Ford, founder and head of the Strawberry Mansion All-Star Baseball League.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
A huge black truck with government plates blocked one side of the alley in Camden. A towering red tarpaulin covered the other. In the middle, the FBI and Camden County investigators were at work. Using gloves, helmets, and an excavator, they scoured the alley and searched a basement near North Third and Erie Streets in the city's Cooper's Poynt neighborhood. What, if anything, authorities found remained unknown Tuesday. But a law enforcement source said the operation, led by Camden County authorities, was tied to a decade-old cold case.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The lawyer handling a defamation suit against The Inquirer filed by Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice Seamus P. McCaffery and his wife told a judge Tuesday that the FBI had "cleared his client," according to a published report. On Tuesday, the Legal Intelligencer's website attributed the statement to Dion G. Rassius. His comment came during a Common Pleas Court hearing on the newspaper's preliminary objections to the lawsuit. It was unclear what the FBI investigation involved. According to the Legal Intelligencer, Rassius said the probe resulted from an Inquirer series on McCaffery and wife Lise Rapaport.
NEWS
June 25, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
FBI agents raided a Fairhill mental health clinic Monday, two months after a former employee sued, claiming she was fired for questioning what she described as fraudulent Medicaid billing. In April, Sheree Brown of Yeadon sued Juniata Community Mental Health Clinic, claiming its administrator, Sandy Acosta, and director, Carlos Matos, who is also a Democratic ward leader in Kensington, pushed her out of a job last year after she voiced her concerns. Federal authorities would not say whether their search of the practice, at 2637 N. Fifth St., was tied to Brown's allegations.
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