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Fbi

NEWS
August 24, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
ONE WEEK. If we could just go one week without a local politician becoming the focus of a cringe-worthy controversy . . . In the meantime, we welcome District Attorney Seth Williams to the ever-growing club of elected officials who have either been indicted or named as the target of a grand jury investigation. For Williams, it's the latter. Federal investigators are probing his finances to determine if he improperly spent campaign funds, a law enforcement source told the Daily News yesterday.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
Even as she contends with state criminal charges, Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane is also facing scrutiny by the FBI, The Inquirer has learned. In recent months, agents have questioned at least three people about several issues, including Kane's role in negotiating a new contract with the union representing narcotics agents in her office, according to people familiar with the matter. The agents sought information about whether Kane suggested to union officials that she would look favorably on their contract if they supported her embattled chief of staff, sources said.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe and Cat Coyle, Inquirer Staff Writers
The body of an unidentified male was found Wednesday in Delaware County, the FBI said, not far from where a missing 11-year-old was last seen. However, the agency would not confirm whether the body discovered in Prospect Park was that of the missing boy. He was last seen riding his bicycle Monday in nearby Folcroft. Folcroft police declined to comment. The FBI said Laquan "Quan" Lattimore, a student at Sharon Hill Elementary School, was possibly with a group of children when he was last spotted in the area of King Avenue and Chester Pike about 3 p.m. Monday.
NEWS
August 5, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The next person to lead the FBI's regional office is a Philadelphia native with a Villanova University degree, and a background in public corruption and terrorism investigations. William F. Sweeney Jr. was named special agent in charge of the bureau's Philadelphia division last this month. He began his new job Monday, replacing Edward J. Hanko, who retired after two years in the post and 29 with the bureau. A 17-year veteran of the bureau, Sweeney started his career in 1998 in Newark, N.J., where he directed an investigation that led to the bribery conviction in 2002 of Robert C. Janiszewski, an influential state Democrat and Hudson County executive who wore a wire to bring down several former associates.
NEWS
August 5, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward J. Hanko, special agent in charge of the FBI's Philadelphia office, still smarts when he remembers a federal jury's rejection of the corruption case his agents had spent years building against six narcotics officers. "That one hurt," he said, recalling the day in May when the verdict was read. The case had been particularly hard-fought. Lawyers for the indicted officers had challenged the competence of Hanko's agents and accused them of ignoring justice for the sake of an indictment.
NEWS
July 12, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
FBI agents descended Friday on Reading City Hall - their second such raid on a Pennsylvania municipal building in as many weeks. Nearly a dozen investigators spent nearly three hours copying contracts and hauling boxes of documents and computer equipment from the offices of Mayor Vaughn Spencer, the city council, and other departments. By afternoon, they had moved on to Spencer's house and spent several hours there. The Berks County raid came eight days after agents conducted a similar sweep through Allentown City Hall, also looking for information on municipal contracts.
NEWS
July 8, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari and Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writers
WASHINGTON - Allentown Mayor Ed Pawlowski suspended his campaign for the Senate on Monday, four days after FBI agents executed search warrants at Allentown City Hall. In a statement, Pawlowski said he was pausing the campaign "to fully focus on assisting in the federal investigation of Allentown contracting practices both prior to his being elected and since. " He said he would reevaluate when he had a clearer picture of the investigation. The news came after agents raided the office Thursday, seized documents, and interviewed Pawlowski and city Managing Director Francis Dougherty, according to a source close to the investigation.
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward J. Hanko, the FBI's top agent in Philadelphia, will retire next month after a 29-year career with the bureau, he announced to agents Tuesday. The Wilkes-Barre native has led the Philadelphia division - the bureau's eighth-largest office - since 2013, and oversaw an investigative force with an expanded focus on counterterrorism, cyber crime and public corruption probes. In an e-mail to colleagues, Hanko, 55, said he had accepted a position as "vice president [for] global security for a Fortune 500 company" and would leave his current post July 31 - two years short of the FBI's mandatory retirement age. Hanko did not respond to calls for comment Tuesday about his future position or his retirement, which had not been officially announced by the bureau.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a surgical device spread an aggressive but undetected uterine cancer inside anesthesiologist Amy Reed in late 2013, she and her husband launched a campaign to ban electric morcellators. Now, the Federal Bureau of Investigation has gotten involved, according to Reed's husband, Philadelphia heart surgeon Hooman Noorchashm, and Sarah Robinson, a California woman whose cancer was also worsened by the device. Both said Wednesday that they have been interviewed by FBI agents, and believe the FBI is looking into whether manufacturers failed to report deaths and serious injuries to the Food and Drug Administration, as required by federal law. "I had been trying to get the FBI's attention for a very long time," said Noorchashm, a heart surgeon at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
NEWS
May 13, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before DNA testing became the gold standard in forensic science, hair analysis was often a prosecutor's trump card. Developed by the FBI's vaunted crime lab, microscopic hair analysis - comparing a hair found at a crime scene with one from a criminal defendant - as described in polished, confident testimony by an FBI hair analyst, could seal a guilty verdict. Now, an ongoing FBI hair-analysis review - preliminary results were announced April 20 - recommends a wholesale look at cases in which testimony about microscopic hair analysis contributed to a guilty verdict.
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