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NEWS
October 17, 2014
IN TAKING THE pulse of how people feel about retirement, a Wells Fargo/Gallup survey of investors found that nearly half fear they will outlive their savings. This certainly was the sentiment of many readers who participated in one of my recent online discussions. "Quite frankly, I am afraid to retire," one woman wrote. "My running default answer to when will I retire is,'I will work until I am unable.' I am 53. I've been divorced since 2004. My kids are adults. My parents are still around.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Anxiety grips us all. We dread our impending decrepitude; World War III; losing our jobs. But how many of us have cheesy angst? Pink does. "I'm afraid of the world running out of cheesecake," the mellifluous Doylestown-born international recording artist tells Women's Health mag. And "of the world running out of Key limes, because Key lime cheesecake is the best. " But her greatest fear was becoming a mom, says Pink, who has a 2-year-old, Willow Sage Hart , with husband Carey Hart . Later, when she became a mom, she learned a different fear, fear for her baby.
NEWS
October 23, 2010
It's rally-attending season! For a forthcoming article, we'd like to hear from readers about their plans. Are you going to Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert's Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear in Washington on Oct. 30? Why or why not? Did you attend Glenn Beck's Aug. 28 Rally to Restore Honor? Know of any good rallies coming up? Please send replies (include name and hometown in case we wish to contact you) to sideshow@phillynews.com .
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
Scott Stossel, editor of the Atlantic magazine, is most terrified of vomiting. Though he hasn't spewed in more than 35 years, his fear of the act is extreme. A successful writer and married father of two, he carries airsickness bags wherever he goes and obsessively tracks stomach-virus outbreaks in fear of having to throw up. Emetophobia, or the fear of vomiting, may be Stossel's most extreme and long-standing worry. But he also becomes sweaty and squeamish at the thought of public speaking (glossophobia)
NEWS
March 28, 2005
Can Abe Krieger do another good deed for readers before he crawls back into his Fueher bunker? Can he take Michelle Malkin, with him? Randolph Floyd Philadelphia I will miss Abe Krieger. He was never genteel, but he also was never wrong. He stated the obvious, but one is not allowed to do that for fear of offending someone. Phil Goodman
NEWS
April 13, 2012 | Staff Report
Today is Friday the 13th, the second of three this year. Of course, most folks know that today is supposed to be unlucky, but why is lost in the mists of time and misfortune. Still, the superstition persists and is so widespread that experts have come up with two names for the fear of Friday the 13th - friggatriskaidekaphobia and paraskevidekatriaphobia . Talk about mouthfuls. (The irrational fear of things associated with the number 13 is known as triskaidekaphobia .)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I am a 32-year-old, married-with-children, educated professional who on outward appearances should have no reason to be miserable. However, I am. Some recent events have triggered deep self-esteem issues that were probably always with me but now I can't seem to get over. I feel I am unlikable, unlovable, and that no one really cares about me. I am possessed by irrational thoughts that I am worthless. No one in my life really seems to be able to help me move forward.
NEWS
November 8, 1994
TUNING OUT AND TUNING IN Everywhere we look, the world urges us to avoid the pleasures of silence - to turn on the radio or the television, to make a phone call, to see a movie, to leap to where the action is - above all, to be active. Many people, I fear, regard contemplative endeavors, like reading and writing, as too low-tech, too labor-intensive, too solitary, too quiet to be personally satisfying. We often act as if silence and solitude are conditions to be avoided at all costs - out of a fear, perhaps, that left alone with our thoughts and feelings, we may discover that we do not make very good company for ourselves.
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
HELL HAS FROZEN over. I did something the other day that I long ago vowed would happen again only over my dead body or when pigs fly . . . over my dead body. I waded into the cesspool of online comments and my email to read the more than 500 responses to last week's column regarding a mayoral candidate's statement about the relationships between police officers and young black men. Race and politics - an Internet troll's lifeblood. As expected, there were plenty of soul-sucking racist comments spurred by anonymity.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The City Council race between incumbent Kenyatta Johnson and Ori Feibush delivered fireworks. But you wouldn't know that from the results of Philadelphia's May 19 Democratic primary. In the end, the freshman councilman outpaced Feibush by nearly 2-1. The Inquirer sat down last week with Feibush, who made headlines long before his self-funded foray into politics as a brash businessman and a staunch critic of Johnson. Feibush, 31, who owns a real estate business and a chain of coffee shops that bear his initials, OCF, is best known as a developer, having helped build hundreds of homes in the rapidly changing Second District, which includes Grays Ferry, Point Breeze, and part of South Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
LORETTA LYNCH, the first black female U.S. attorney general, put an exclamation point on the end of the five-day 106th Annual NAACP Convention last night, summoning an America in which black urban kids aren't viewed as future criminals - and in which some of them want to become cops. "We need children, particularly children of color - our children - to turn toward the law-enforcement officers in their neighborhoods," Lynch told about 1,000 attendees at a final-night awards ceremony at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | BY JASON MORGAN WARD, Tribune News Service
I NOTICED THE FLAGS first. In the most widely circulated image of Dylann Roof, who is charged with murdering nine African-Americans at Charleston, S.C.'s Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, the white 21-year-old sports a jacket emblazoned with flag patches from two failed white supremacist states: Rhodesia and apartheid-era South Africa. In another shot, Roof appears to be showing off a flag-festooned license plate that pays homage to another failed white-supremacist regime - the Confederate States of America.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six homes now sit abandoned in the 400 block of Bickley Place in Chester, their doors kicked in and windows boarded up, and residents of the rowhouse street say they are living in a state of fear. Dozens of them talked quietly among themselves Wednesday about the "suspicious" fires at three rowhouses. The fires have occurred every other night since Friday; three other houses have suffered smoke and water damage. The six now-vacant homes constitute about a quarter of the block.
NEWS
May 27, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Camden County seeks to expand its police force beyond the city of Camden, the only place it patrols now, a hurdle has emerged: Most of the county's 36 other municipalities want no part of it. Officials in those towns say replacing their police departments with one run by the county would erase their identity and the relationships between officers and residents. They also fear the county would send more officers into Camden, one of the nation's most dangerous cities, than into their towns.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
As neighbors filled the church pews and lined the aisles, they were warned: Don't talk about your property taxes tonight. But some feared the project on the table - 22 single-family houses spanning half a block of Point Breeze - would price them out of their homes. And the man at the front of the room, developer-turned-candidate Ori Feibush, seemed to only add to the anxiety. In minutes, people were shouting over the pews. "I would love change. But we want affordable change," a woman yelled into the microphone as others waited to speak.
NEWS
May 3, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
After hearing about the deadly earthquake in Nepal on Saturday, Bibek Khadka could not sleep. "I was too scared," said Khadka, 29, a Nepalese immigrant who lives in Bryn Mawr. For three days, he was unable to reach his family. He finally got a phone call from his brother on Monday with good news: His family had survived. But his brother was surrounded by destruction in Kathmandu, the country's capital, and he still feared for his safety. "He told me that he thought it was the end of the world," Khadka said.
NEWS
April 22, 2015
WHEN AN African-American is wrongly shot by a Philadelphia police officer, it's more likely the officer will be black than white. However, more white police officers are involved in shootings, because there are more white officers. Those are statistics, but without context. For that, join me in the police commissioner's conference room. On the wall behind Charles Ramsey's chair are portraits of eight officers killed in the line of duty since he arrived in 2008. Ramsey recites the officers' names and dates of death.
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
HELL HAS FROZEN over. I did something the other day that I long ago vowed would happen again only over my dead body or when pigs fly . . . over my dead body. I waded into the cesspool of online comments and my email to read the more than 500 responses to last week's column regarding a mayoral candidate's statement about the relationships between police officers and young black men. Race and politics - an Internet troll's lifeblood. As expected, there were plenty of soul-sucking racist comments spurred by anonymity.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trish Henwood, the University of Pennsylvania emergency-room physician who twice went to Liberia to fight Ebola, says global intervention - albeit too late - still saved hundreds of thousands of lives. She also says the frantic reaction here showed U.S. leaders that improving health systems in fragile African nations is in our national security interest. Henwood, who gave Penn's annual Global Distinguished Lecture on Tuesday evening, told a rapt audience that fear too often trumped science and "definitely hampered the response . . . and led to more panic than preparedness.
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