CollectionsFear Factor
IN THE NEWS

Fear Factor

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 1, 2007 | By Cynthia Tucker
So what sort of presidential campaign do you run if you're too liberal for conservatives, too Republican for Democrats, and you drag along a personal life too messy for moderates? Rudy Giuliani has just answered that question: He'll be counting on the fear factor. Giuliani has become the first Republican presidential candidate to enthusiastically embrace the Karl Rove strategy of scaring voters into becoming supporters. Campaigning in New Hampshire recently, Giuliani declared that if a Democrat were to be elected president in 2008, he (or she)
SPORTS
October 21, 2008
From: Gonzalez, John To: Ford, Bob; Sheridan, Phil Subject: Tampa bound I might be one of the few people in Philly who wanted to see Boston pull it out. I think this year's incarnation of the Sox isn't/wasn't as strong as in years past. Plus, I would have enjoyed a good Boston-Philly dustup. Tampa Bay scares me more. The Rays are a quality club. Not to mention there is an ugly recent history between the cities. I'm not sure Philly could take another big loss to Tampa.
NEWS
April 22, 2015
WHEN AN African-American is wrongly shot by a Philadelphia police officer, it's more likely the officer will be black than white. However, more white police officers are involved in shootings, because there are more white officers. Those are statistics, but without context. For that, join me in the police commissioner's conference room. On the wall behind Charles Ramsey's chair are portraits of eight officers killed in the line of duty since he arrived in 2008. Ramsey recites the officers' names and dates of death.
NEWS
November 7, 1988 | By Gina Boubion, Daily News Staff Writer
Diane Vanderhost was so severely beaten by Nicodemo Scarfo Jr. in a Hahnemann University Hospital elevator Friday that "fluid" was coming out of her ears, according to a police report read at a bail hearing. Scarfo Jr.'s bail was set at $100,000 on Saturday and posted an hour later, Bail Commissioner Charles Murray Jr. said. Scarfo Jr., 23, son of reputed mob boss Nicodemo Scarfo, was charged with assaulting Vanderhost, 36, of Marston Street near Sedgley Avenue, North Philadelphia, during a visit to his brother, Mark.
NEWS
December 15, 2009 | By William Ecenbarger FOR THE INQUIRER
They were known as "Scooch" and "the Boss," and together they unleashed a five-year reign of terror over Luzerne County's courthouse and schools. "Scooch" is the nickname since childhood of former Judge Mark A. Ciavarella Jr., whose real name came to strike fear into any child unfortunate enough to come before him, even for relatively minor infractions, such as writing on stop signs with a felt pen. The word in high school classrooms and halls was: If you go before Judge Ciavarella, you're likely to go to jail - especially if he's in a bad mood over Penn State's losing a football game.
SPORTS
March 31, 2004 | By Joe Santoliquito INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Part of being a goaltender on the lacrosse field is dealing with a fear factor. Goalies constantly face the challenge of stopping a hard rubber ball fired at them, using any body part that's available. Ryan Konop took to the position quickly after being introduced to it last year. The New Egypt senior has blossomed into one of the best goaltenders in South Jersey. Konop will start in goal for the second straight season this year for the Warriors. He has become accustomed to the bumps and bruises that accompany the position.
NEWS
February 5, 1992 | by Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer
Norristown cops probing the terror shooting this week of a Cambodian couple during a violent robbery said "the fear factor" is causing potential witnesses to clam up. The thugs distinguished themselves - and sent a fearsome message - by holding a gun to a 3-year-old child's head and demanding money, police said. Yesterday, cops pressed the hunt for the three Asian men who robbed and shot restaurateur Long Som, 40, and his wife, Suk Lim, at their home on George Street Monday afternoon.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1986 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
"I'm a deal junkie," said developer Bill Rouse when asked why he decided to buy into an aging landmark in North Philadelphia. "The Uptown Theater - we're not keeping the name NU-TEC - could have been anywhere and I would have gotten into the deal. " But the theater isn't "anywhere. " It's in the heart of North Philadelphia. Despite Rouse's intentions to "walk quietly and carry a small stick," his name shines like a beacon to investors. Rouse is the developer of the $600 million One Liberty Place tower and Penn's Landing.
NEWS
March 14, 2003
OK, I ADMIT it. I like watching some of those "reality" TV shows: "Fear Factor," some of "Joe Millionaire," an episode or two of "Survivor. " But whose reality is this? In my reality, maybe 10 percent of the people I see are hot. Seventy-five percent are someone I would marry. The other 15 percent, no one wants to look at. I'm somewhere in the middle group. But in all these shows, their reality consists of the first group. The women have to have implants and the men must have six packs.
SPORTS
December 27, 1994 | by Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Writer
John Bunting would not be the least bit surprised to see Dick Vermeil return to the Eagles as coach and/or general manager. The only surprise would be that it took 12 years for it to happen. "I have thought from the day he left that he'd be back," said Bunting, a Kansas City Chiefs defensive assistant and a former Eagles linebacker who spent seven of his 11 NFL seasons playing for Vermeil. "I just never thought it would take this long. "When you look at all of the opportunities he's turned down in the past, I wondered if he'd ever come back.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 22, 2015
WHEN AN African-American is wrongly shot by a Philadelphia police officer, it's more likely the officer will be black than white. However, more white police officers are involved in shootings, because there are more white officers. Those are statistics, but without context. For that, join me in the police commissioner's conference room. On the wall behind Charles Ramsey's chair are portraits of eight officers killed in the line of duty since he arrived in 2008. Ramsey recites the officers' names and dates of death.
NEWS
May 14, 2013
THIS IS GOING to surprise almost all of you. America is nearly as safe as your mother's arms. Violent crime has dropped by 50 percent since 1993, and gun homicide is down the same - 3.2 gun deaths per 100,000 Americans in 2011, contrasted with 6.6 in 1993, according to FBI statistics. There were actually more gun suicides (18,735) than homicides (11,493) in 2009, the last year reported. We are living in the safest times since the 1960s - and the plummeting gun-murder rate happened without new federal gun-control laws.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2011 | By Howard Gensler
IN TATTLE'S continuing fascination with reality-TV programming not being satisfied until somebody actually dies on camera, here's another potentially scary scenario from TMZ.com: On the set of the returning "Fear Factor," a contestant strapped to a truck was taken to the hospital after something got in the driver's eyes and he smashed into another car. Thankfully, an ambulance was there in less than a minute. The contestant was released from the hospital with no serious injuries so there's still a chance to win . . . $50,000.
NEWS
April 18, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The news is unquestionably frightening: political turmoil at home and abroad; worries over oil, gas, and food prices; earthquakes, tsunamis, nuclear meltdowns . . . And that's just in the last few months. Marketers are on high alert. Doomsday is nigh! they shout online and on late-night TV as they hype "survivalist seed banks" and "apocalypse gardens" to the nervous and fearful. More than a dozen companies offer deals of up to 94,000 vegetable seeds, stored in tightly sealed buckets and "ammo boxes," that will feed a family of four for years or decades.
NEWS
December 15, 2009 | By William Ecenbarger FOR THE INQUIRER
They were known as "Scooch" and "the Boss," and together they unleashed a five-year reign of terror over Luzerne County's courthouse and schools. "Scooch" is the nickname since childhood of former Judge Mark A. Ciavarella Jr., whose real name came to strike fear into any child unfortunate enough to come before him, even for relatively minor infractions, such as writing on stop signs with a felt pen. The word in high school classrooms and halls was: If you go before Judge Ciavarella, you're likely to go to jail - especially if he's in a bad mood over Penn State's losing a football game.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By George Parry
A television reporter once asked Charles Peruto Sr., the dean of the Philadelphia criminal defense bar, for his opinion on television cameras in the courtroom. Chuck enthusiastically endorsed the idea with these insightful words (which I quote from memory): "I would point to the television camera and dare the jury to look into it and tell my client, 'Mad Dog' DiFrancesco, that he is guilty!" A shrewd judge of human nature, Chuck had identified the enhanced fear factor that courtroom cameras would introduce for juries trying violent criminals.
NEWS
January 13, 2009 | By Craig R. McCoy and Mario F. Cattabiani INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Even after he agreed to testify against former State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo, one-time Fumo techie Leonard P. Luchko just couldn't cut his ties to his old boss. Despite mutterings from others there, he turned up with about 30 other Fumo aides, past and present, for a dinner Nov. 25 at Scannicchio's restaurant, at Broad and Porter Streets in South Philadelphia, marking Fumo's final week in the Senate. And even after his guilty plea to charges of taking part in a Fumo cover-up, the 52-year-old computer technician, perhaps bored and angry, kept exchanging e-mails with the state senator - and sending other e-mails to news blogs and Web sites.
NEWS
July 25, 2008 | By Jonathan Last
Sometimes political parties play to type so perfectly that it's almost charming. Consider the completely predictable responses of Democrats and Republicans to the record prices of oil. Both parties agree that $4 gasoline is problematic. From there, they part ways. Democrats blame the oil companies and speculators. Republicans point the finger at government interference and increased global demand. Democrats want to tax and regulate their way out of the problem by passing increased carbon-tax measures and fuel-economy standards.
NEWS
May 1, 2007 | By Cynthia Tucker
So what sort of presidential campaign do you run if you're too liberal for conservatives, too Republican for Democrats, and you drag along a personal life too messy for moderates? Rudy Giuliani has just answered that question: He'll be counting on the fear factor. Giuliani has become the first Republican presidential candidate to enthusiastically embrace the Karl Rove strategy of scaring voters into becoming supporters. Campaigning in New Hampshire recently, Giuliani declared that if a Democrat were to be elected president in 2008, he (or she)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|