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Feathers

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FOOD
April 20, 1988 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q. How do they pluck the feathers off chickens in such mass quantities? Also, why do supermarket chickens taste so different from chickens I buy from a small farm? B. McGregor Saugerties, N.Y. A. Your questions are answered by David Kingsmill, a food writer and a restaurant critic with the Toronto Star in Canada: "As to plucking feathers, many different types of machines are used, but in effect the feathers are loosened by a hot scald and then dragged through a cylinder or tub with strong rubber fingers that strip the feathers out. In some machines I've seen, the fingers whir in a circle; in others, the fingers move up and down against each other, in effect pinching the feathers out. It's all very crude, really, and a chicken can go through one of these in as little time as 15 seconds.
NEWS
November 15, 1991 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
The last thing anthropologist, museum curator and Mayan technology expert Ruben Reina needs is another title, but at the rate the Penn faculty member is going, he'll be a certified ornithologist in no time. Listening to Reina talk about the South American turkey-like currasow or the gargantuan harpy eagle, you'd think the curator emeritus at the University Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology had his sights set on a zoology job. But for the past five years, Reina has been a man of birds, or more specifically, feathers.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Feathers are one of the most vividly colored natural materials available to the artisan, and one of the most colorfast. They have been used by many cultures for thousands of years to impart a special texture and sculptural presence to textiles, ceremonial objects and body decorations. Western designers have sewn feathers to dresses and stuck them in hatbands, but otherwise the feather hasn't made much impact on our aesthetic consciousness. If you want to see feathers transformed into art, you have to travel to the South American rain forests, the highlands of New Guinea, or to an ethnological museum that owns ancient Andean or Polynesian featherwork.
NEWS
December 31, 1991 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The feathers were flying at the Hog Island Fancy Club last night - at least until they met up with a staple gun or hot glue. T.J. McCann and Linda Goldstein had 5,000 feathers between them, enough to decorate the unicorn McCann had fabricated from papier-mache for tomorrow's Mummers Parade. Cathy McCann, T.J.'s older sister, was feathering a juvenile costume for Jessica Myers who plans to parade as Mistress Hook. Frank Zern swore off feathers two days ago. "I'm a sequin guy this week," said Zern, who will march in his 44th parade as Hog Island's co-captain.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1996 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
What do Sesame Street's Big Bird, fuzzy bedroom slippers, an Indian headdress and many a Mummer's costumes have in common? They are all made with turkey feathers. Did you think all those feathers you don't eat go to waste? Actually, some do. But, every year, American Plume in Clark's Summit, near Scranton, uses some 31 billion turkey feathers. American Plume has been supplying America's feather needs since 1921. The soft, fluffy trim known as marabou is made from turkey feathers.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By Alicia Chang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - The discovery of a giant meat-eating dinosaur sporting a downy coat has some scientists reimagining the look of Tyrannosaurus rex. With a killer jaw and sharp claws, T. rex has long been depicted in movies and popular culture as having scaly skin. But the discovery of an earlier relative suggests the king of dinosaurs may have had a softer side. The evidence comes from the unearthing of a new tyrannosaur species in northeastern China that lived 60 million years before T. rex. The fossil record preserved remains of fluffy down, making it the largest feathered dinosaur ever found.
NEWS
November 6, 1987 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The room was awash in color. Feathers of red, orange, yellow and blue covered tables and filled metal cabinets. They adorned headdresses and bandoleers, and decorated arrows and ornaments. To most people, these colorful artifacts from Indian cultures throughout the Americas conjure up pictures of primitive societies, with many superstitions and little or no technology. Researchers studying the feather objects at the University Museum, however, say they are finding the Indians very sophisticated - with intricate feather- working techniques they compared to the work of fine jewelers.
NEWS
August 9, 1993 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Judy Enright, 54, is a professional artist, currently exhibiting in Chicago. Usually she works in oils. But recently she tried something a little different: genuine bird feathers. Like much artistic inspiration, it was sort of a fluke. She lives in a small town in Michigan called Brighton. The area has many lakes, ponds and streams. So migratory birds frequently stop there. And they loiter in her yard because she feeds them. Birds shed feathers and this led to a hobby.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | By Curtis Rist, Inquirer Staff Writer
What would Thanksgiving be without the turkey? And what, Mummers might ask, would their parade be without a bird of a different feather: the ostrich? From elaborate back pieces in fancy brigades to small suits for children, ostrich plumes are the key to costuming in the Mummers' annual strut up Broad Street. "We couldn't even think of costumes without ostrich feathers," John Pignotti, captain of the Hegeman String Band, said as he was looking over this year's bill for 353 dozen ostrich plumes - at a cost of more than $14,000.
NEWS
March 25, 2007 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gardeners are famous for recycling. They convert kitchen scraps to compost, stake tomatoes with old pantyhose, and hang unwanted CDs on sticks to spook birds in the berry patch. But there's one thing every gardener buys that routinely gets tossed in the trash and buried in a landfill: the plastic flower pots used to grow seedlings. They're everywhere, especially at this time of year. They don't decompose, and they're not usually made of the plastic recycled in these parts.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 1, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid ongoing ethical debate over the parental tactics that led to a lung transplant for 11-year-old Sarah Murnaghan, many experts are acknowledging a crucial point: Janet and Francis Murnaghan were right. National lung-transplant allocation rules have unfairly denied children under 12 the chance to get lungs from adult donors. In an editorial last month in New England Journal, two such experts credited the parents with calling attention to the inequity - but not before criticizing them for waging a media and legal campaign to save Sarah.
NEWS
April 5, 2013
By Jim McGovern Included in a really spectacular Easter vigil sermon was this poem by Emily Dickinson. Hope is the thing with feathers That perches in the soul, And sings the tune - without the words, And never stops at all, And sweetest in the gale is heard; And sore must be the storm That could abash the little bird That kept so many warm. I've heard it in the chillest land, And on the strangest sea; Yet, never, in extremity, It asked a crumb of me. Hope.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once upon a time a magic kingdom, designed by children and built by volunteers, sprouted almost overnight in Evesham. It had turrets and slides, jiggly stairs, secret passages, sandboxes, and a pirate ship with anchors on the side, all made of wood. Children from around the township and beyond came to Memorial Field to play in it. But 21 years passed. The park grew tired and began to splinter. And so, this month, bulldozers will demolish the Scott Rand Playground, named for the late resident who guided its creation.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
It's like going to a great party with lots of champagne: Priscilla Queen of the Desert - The Musical is so much fun, so spectacular to look at, with so many danceable songs, that we all just bounced out of the Academy of Music on Tuesday night. Based on the 1994 Australian movie The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert , the musical follows three friends, all drag queens, from Sydney to Alice Springs, where, among other things, they finally climb Ayer's Rock. Priscilla is the name of the jalopy of a bus that takes Tick to see the wife and son nobody knew he had. The show is not only a blinged-up razzle-dazzler full of feathers and sparkles but is also full of heart and important lessons about tolerance and love and friendship.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By Elizabeth Horkley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jen Cohan had spent all morning primping her kids for a Christmas card photo shoot. The only thing missing was Elke, the family rat terrier. Elke was 16 and had been ill for months. Before she started looking, Jen knew: Elke was dead. "What do you do when your chickens die?" she texted her friend, an urban farmer. "Beth Beverly," he replied. Beverly is a Philadelphia taxidermist who specializes in a more creative type of mount. "Elke might end up a hat or a Christmas tree topper," Jen's friend warned, but Jen had worked in fashion and needed little convincing.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THE NINE NOMINEES selected by Mayor Nutter to serve on the Philadelphia Housing Authority board came before City Council on Wednesday to answer questions regarding their plans to help move the troubled agency forward. But one nominee - Joan Markman, the city's chief integrity officer and former prosecutor for both the U.S. Attorney's Office and the District Attorney's Office - caused some Council members to balk. "She has all of this federal background, but none relates to tenants, housing, PHA," said Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell.
NEWS
October 14, 2012 | By Pete Yost, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Justice Department is going to allow members of federally recognized Indian tribes to possess eagle feathers, although that's a federal crime. This is a significant religious and cultural issue for many tribes, who were consulted in advance about the policy the department announced Friday. The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and other federal wildlife laws criminalize the killing of eagles and possession of feathers and bird parts, but the Constitution and federal laws also give tribes local sovereignty for self-government.
NEWS
August 9, 2012
Dom Giordano's op-ed regarding Chick-fil-A on Aug. 7 left me confused, since he usually takes a pragmatic view. This time he goes out of his way to misstate facts, leave out facts he's aware of and continue a personal political vendetta, not to mention his grandstanding on an issue that no one else in Philadelphia did, including members of the LGBT community. Only Dom Giordano. First, all sensible people support freedom of speech, even speech that is offensive to us. It's in the Constitution.
SPORTS
May 11, 2012 | BY ED BARKOWITZ, Daily News Staff Writer
It's a safe bet that rookie Simon Pagenaud will never forget this week's visit to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Doing the typically insane 200 mph, Pagenaud hit a bird, which caused a sizable dent in the grill protecting the radiator. "I saw the birds, but I didn't know [I hit one]," Pagenaud said. "I didn't even know it was in the car. I just thought they flew away. " It's doubtful the wayward bird, rest his [or her] soul, ever knew what hit him [or her]. Pagenaud's crew needed 20 minutes to fix the damage.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By Alicia Chang, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - The discovery of a giant meat-eating dinosaur sporting a downy coat has some scientists reimagining the look of Tyrannosaurus rex. With a killer jaw and sharp claws, T. rex has long been depicted in movies and popular culture as having scaly skin. But the discovery of an earlier relative suggests the king of dinosaurs may have had a softer side. The evidence comes from the unearthing of a new tyrannosaur species in northeastern China that lived 60 million years before T. rex. The fossil record preserved remains of fluffy down, making it the largest feathered dinosaur ever found.
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