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Federal Assistance

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NEWS
November 5, 1991 | By Julia Cass, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this article
Gov. Florio yesterday sought $72 million in federal disaster aid for the New Jersey Shore because of last week's flooding along the coast. In a letter to President Bush, Florio requested the disaster declaration so the state could obtain federal assistance, the governor's office said. Preliminary estimates indicate that the five coastal counties - Monmouth, Ocean, Atlantic, Cape May and Cumberland - suffered approximately $72 million in damage. The estimate includes $20.8 million in damage to private homes, $8.1 million in damage to commercial property and $43 million in damage to public property, including erosion of the state's beaches, according to the governor's office.
NEWS
December 29, 1992 | By William H. Sokolic, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Only 32 Cape May residents have applied for federal assistance for storm- related damage, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Cape May County lags far behind the rest of the state in the number of applicants for federal aid. Since assistance became available Dec. 18, 3,657 applications have been filed statewide, said Mary Colvin, public affairs officer for FEMA. By contrast, FEMA's Atlantic City office, which encompasses Brigantine, Ventnor, Margate, and Longport, had 373 applicants as of Sunday.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRENTON - Gov. Chris Christie on Wednesday raised the estimate of New Jersey's costs of recovering and rebuilding from Superstorm Sandy to nearly $37 billion and said that the state would seek federal aid to cover most of the expenses. Christie announced the revised total Wednesday to include $7.4 billion to cover mitigation, protection and prevention of future disasters. A preliminary total of $29.4 billion announced last week covers repairs and response. The total amount is greater than the state's entire yearly budget.
NEWS
August 18, 2000 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
President Clinton designated Sussex and Morris Counties federal disaster areas yesterday, allowing residents whose homes and properties were ravaged by last weekend's flooding and mud slides to apply for federal assistance. The disaster declaration will enable the Federal Emergency Management Agency to begin relief efforts in towns hardest hit by torrential rains in the northwestern part of the state. A toll-free hotline was being set up to provide information on how to apply for federal aid. The storm affected about 2,700 homes and businesses and caused an estimated $100 million in flood damage, state officials said.
NEWS
March 8, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
February's ice and snow storms cost taxpayers in Chester County about $7 million, much of it for salt, plowing, and overtime for emergency personnel. In Montgomery County, the bill was about $8 million. Millions more were spent in Bucks and Delaware Counties. But despite suffering one of the worst stretches of weather in its history - not to mention a mammoth number of power outages - the Philadelphia region will receive zero dollars in federal aid. That's because the weather failed to wreak enough havoc across the state.
NEWS
April 16, 2005 | By Leslie A. Pappas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
President Bush yesterday issued a federal disaster declaration for Bucks and eight other Pennsylvania counties affected by recent flooding. The action makes federal funds available. Republican U.S. Rep. Michael Fitzpatrick of Bucks County, who had lobbied for the disaster declaration, said he was pleased by Bush's action. Other counties affected are Bradford, Columbia, Luzerne, Monroe, Northampton, Pike, Wayne and Wyoming. The federal assistance can include grants for temporary housing and repairs, low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses, and other programs to help individuals and businesses recover.
NEWS
November 25, 2012 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Christie estimates that Sandy cost New Jersey $29.4 billion in damage and economic losses, from washed-out roadways and waterlogged homes to manning storm shelters. "This preliminary number is based on the best available data, field observations, and geographical mapping," Christie said in a statement released Friday evening. "I will spare no effort and waste no time to rebuild and restore our tourism industry, our transportation and utilities infrastructure, and the lives of our citizens for the long term.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
By Frank Cerabino WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - Thousands of Floridians have gotten the idea that seceding from the United States is the proper reaction to the presidential election. This is good news for me - especially if these foes of tyranny put their rugged individualism into actual action by not using Interstate 95. My commute will be much easier when I don't have to share the federal highway with freeloading secessionists. Since President Obama was reelected - an outrageous perversion of democracy in which the person with the most votes was declared the winner - online secession petitions have popped up in more than 20 states.
NEWS
August 3, 2000 | By Matthew P. Blanchard and Kristin Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Ridge yesterday declared Bucks County a disaster area, a few days after powerful rainstorms and flash floods struck the county's southern corner Sunday night. The declaration is the first step in a process that could give flood victims access to millions of dollars in federal loans and grants. Federal money, however, is by no means assured. Four townships - Upper and Lower Southampton, Northampton and Bensalem - were hammered with 8.8 inches of rain in three hours, causing flash flooding that buckled asphalt and carried muddy torrents into more than 175 homes and businesses.
NEWS
February 26, 1998 | By Elsa C. Arnett, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Matthew Baste wanted his mother's engagement ring back. Denny Bache-Wiig was missing the roof to her mobile home. And Doris Francis longed for the two neighbors who played bingo and shuffleboard with her each week. But the deadliest tornado strike ever recorded in Florida took them all. And the weary residents of central Florida settled yesterday for President Clinton's sympathy, comforting words, and promise of federal disaster aid. "I don't think anyone can fail to be moved and awestruck by the amount of damage that can be done, and the lives and the treasures that can be taken away in a matter of just a few seconds," a solemn Clinton said as he toured wreckage of the storm that roared across the Sunshine State on Monday, killing at least 38 people, injuring more than 260 and leaving hundreds homeless.
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BUSINESS
June 22, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
After countless hours of courtroom argument, dozens of briefs, and seemingly endless legal maneuvering, the fate of President Obama's Affordable Care Act comes down to the meaning of six simple words. On June 28, 2012, when the U.S. Supreme Court first narrowly upheld the law, it seemed the bitter struggle over Obama's huge expansion of federally funded health care had come to an end. But the calm was short-lived. Within a few months, conservative legal theorists seized on a little-noticed sentence in the law that seemed to limit federal assistance for consumers to buy health insurance purchased on state-established exchanges, or marketplaces.
NEWS
March 8, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
February's ice and snow storms cost taxpayers in Chester County about $7 million, much of it for salt, plowing, and overtime for emergency personnel. In Montgomery County, the bill was about $8 million. Millions more were spent in Bucks and Delaware Counties. But despite suffering one of the worst stretches of weather in its history - not to mention a mammoth number of power outages - the Philadelphia region will receive zero dollars in federal aid. That's because the weather failed to wreak enough havoc across the state.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a highly critical letter, U.S. Department of Labor officials have rebuked the State of Pennsylvania for "serious compliance issues" in its operation of the unemployment insurance program. The commonwealth has often underperformed so profoundly in the timely handling of unemployment insurance forms and other matters - many within the last year - that the federal government may consider sanctions that would restrict budget money to the Department of Labor and Industry, according to the letter.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRENTON - Gov. Chris Christie on Wednesday raised the estimate of New Jersey's costs of recovering and rebuilding from Superstorm Sandy to nearly $37 billion and said that the state would seek federal aid to cover most of the expenses. Christie announced the revised total Wednesday to include $7.4 billion to cover mitigation, protection and prevention of future disasters. A preliminary total of $29.4 billion announced last week covers repairs and response. The total amount is greater than the state's entire yearly budget.
NEWS
November 25, 2012 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Christie estimates that Sandy cost New Jersey $29.4 billion in damage and economic losses, from washed-out roadways and waterlogged homes to manning storm shelters. "This preliminary number is based on the best available data, field observations, and geographical mapping," Christie said in a statement released Friday evening. "I will spare no effort and waste no time to rebuild and restore our tourism industry, our transportation and utilities infrastructure, and the lives of our citizens for the long term.
NEWS
November 22, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey's 14-member congressional delegation conferred with Gov. Christie in a closed-door meeting Tuesday to map out a plan to access maximum federal aid in the wake of Sandy. But an official estimate of how much damage the storm inflicted, key to seeking federal funds, will not be released by the state Treasury until next week, according to a Christie spokesman. "We're only going to get one shot at this," Democratic U.S. Rep. Frank Pallone, who represents coastal Monmouth and Middlesex Counties, said of the estimate.
NEWS
November 21, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - New Jersey's 14-member congressional delegation conferred with Gov. Christie at a closed-door meeting Tuesday to map out a plan to access maximum federal aid in the wake of Sandy. But an official estimate of how much damage the storm inflicted, key to seeking federal funds, will not be released by the state Treasury until next week, according to a Christie spokesman. "We're only going to get one shot at this," Democratic U.S. Rep. Frank Pallone, who represents coastal Monmouth and Middlesex counties, said of the estimate.
NEWS
November 21, 2012 | By James Osborne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
MANAHAWKIN, N.J. - In what seems another life now, Mark Rahn was on the phone with his ex-wife, getting a lecture about the need to get off the barrier island town of Seaside Heights before Sandy hit the coast. "I was going to throw a hurricane party," Rahn, 54, recalled Tuesday. So began a three-week odyssey that took Rahn through three storm shelters and a seemingly endless series of conversations with federal disaster officials as he tried to verify that he, and not a woman he briefly allowed to stay in his apartment, was entitled to the federal assistance she subsequently claimed.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
By Frank Cerabino WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - Thousands of Floridians have gotten the idea that seceding from the United States is the proper reaction to the presidential election. This is good news for me - especially if these foes of tyranny put their rugged individualism into actual action by not using Interstate 95. My commute will be much easier when I don't have to share the federal highway with freeloading secessionists. Since President Obama was reelected - an outrageous perversion of democracy in which the person with the most votes was declared the winner - online secession petitions have popped up in more than 20 states.
NEWS
April 7, 2009 | By Matt Katz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A $1 million award of federal funds for Camden police will be used for acoustic sensors that pinpoint the location of gunshots, laptops to provide on-the-fly crime-pattern analysis, and license-plate readers that help identify stolen cars. Police and politicians staged a news conference yesterday at Camden police headquarters to offer details on how the money, announced last month as part of a $410 billion federal spending bill, will modernize the city's aging police infrastructure.
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