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Federal Ban

NEWS
September 28, 2004 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Fishermen, if not the fish, got a reprieve yesterday as Gov. McGreevey signed into law new size limits for striped bass that will bring the state into compliance with national regulations. An emergency vote by the state Senate - followed by the governor's signature just three hours later - averted a federal ban on the popular fishing season just as it was getting under way. The new daily catch and possession regulations, which allow anglers to keep one fish 24 to 28 inches long and another that measures more than 34 inches, were adopted by the Assembly in June.
NEWS
April 7, 1998 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is the first and only state that allows doctor-assisted suicide. And now that two such deaths have taken place, many Oregonians worry that the federal government may try to nullify the law. The general feeling in Oregon seems to be that the statute worked precisely as it should when two people ended their lives in recent weeks using lethal drugs prescribed by their physicians. "I think people in Oregon made a decision and the Congress should leave us alone," said Sheri Williams, 29, a bank clerk from Waldport, Ore. "You can't just do it, you know.
NEWS
February 8, 2008 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Assembly yesterday approved a measure that asks New Jersey voters to allow Atlantic City casinos to take bets on professional sporting events. Before the vote, the bill's sponsors promised to amend the measure to possibly include sports wagering at the state's ailing racetracks if it passed in the Senate, which has not yet taken up the issue. The Assembly voted 58-17 to approve the bill, even though federal law limits sports betting or lotteries to four states: Nevada, Delaware, Montana and Oregon.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1996 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The new federal ban on Internet "indecency" isn't even being enforced by the government, but that hardly matters to journalist Jim Warren. He insists that he has already been censored because of it. And he's quitting. "I am right now writing my final column [for BoardWatch, a print and online magazine], because I'm resigning," Warren, 60, of San Francisco, said this week. An intentionally crude reference to the imagined sexual practices of a U.S. senator was excised from Warren's latest column denouncing the indecency ban. Warren's editor, David Hakala, said yesterday that he cut the offending paragraph only out of concern for readers' sensibilities.
NEWS
October 31, 1994 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr. and Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Democratic gubernatorial hopeful Mark Singel went toe-to-toe here yesterday with 15 angry members of the Elk County Militia, a group of gun owners upset over his position on assault weapons. The group confronted the lieutenant governor as he entered a political dinner. Before it was over, Singel got into a shouting match with a man who said Singel had violated his oath of office for supporting legislation that conflicts with the Second Amendment right to bear arms. The group also accused him of not being tough enough on people who break the law, a reference to Republican Tom Ridge's assertion that Singel has been "soft" on crime as chairman of the state Board of Pardons.
NEWS
February 26, 2008 | DEBBIE WOODELL
IT IS TIME TO END the federal ban on blood donations from gay men. The policy, established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1983 after the rise of the AIDS crisis, is based, at least, on outdated science, and, at worst, on bigotry. The FDA forbids the use of blood donated by any man who has had sex with another man since 1977, claiming on its Web site that they "have an HIV prevalence . . . 60 times higher than the general population, 800 times higher than first-time blood donors and 8,000 times higher than repeat blood donors.
NEWS
August 8, 2008
ON JULY 17, 2007, at an event of the Planned Parenthood Action Fund, Barack Obama vowed to sign a radical pro-abortion law, saying, "Well, the first thing I'd do as president is sign the Freedom of Choice Act. " This, in part, would invalidate the federal ban on partial-birth abortion. Although Obama has only served in the Senate since 2005, he's been a consistent supporter of abortion. He blocked a bill that would have guaranteed that a baby born alive, regardless of stage of development or attempted abortion, be afforded full legal rights under the law. How can killing a baby be justified under any circumstances?
NEWS
May 16, 2003
WELL, SO MUCH for keeping America safe from terrorists, cop killers, deranged snipers and other bad guys. In an act as cowardly as it is immoral, the Republican-led Congress has decided to allow a federal ban on semi-automatic assault weapons such as Uzizs to expire. Majority Leader Tom Delay, who's been busy trying to convince the Department of Homeland Security to go after Democrats in his home state of Texas, has announced that Congress will not even entertain the thought of extending the ban when it expires next year.
NEWS
November 13, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
MEXICO CITY - A group of Latin American leaders declared Monday that votes by two U.S. states to legalize marijuana have important implications for efforts to quash drug smuggling, offering the first government reaction from a region increasingly frustrated with the U.S.-backed war on drugs. The declaration by the leaders of Mexico, Belize, Honduras and Costa Rica did not explicitly say they were considering weakening their governments' efforts against marijuana smuggling, but it strongly implied the votes last week in Colorado and Washington would make enforcement of marijuana bans more difficult.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
A poll released Tuesday shows that 45 percent of New Jersey residents favor sports betting at Atlantic City casinos and the state's racetracks despite a federal law that prohibits it in all states but Nevada and three other states. The poll showed support for Gov. Christie's decision to move forward with his plan to allow wagering on pro and college sports despite the federal ban. Fifty-eight percent, up from 53 percent in September 2011, the last time a similar question was asked, favor having sports betting in general, not taking into account the federal ban. "Although support is not overwhelming, these numbers suggest the public is cautiously behind the goal of moving forward with legalized sports betting," said Krista Jenkins, executive director of the PublicMind poll and a professor of political science at Fairleigh Dickinson University.
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