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NEWS
September 23, 1998 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Township officials are less than happy with the Federal Highway Administration's final report on the Route 202 bypass project and have not ruled out reconsidering their lawsuit against FHA at their meeting tonight. "The answers to some of our concerns are hand-waving arguments at best," Raymond Stepnoski, chairman of Buckingham's Board of Supervisors, said of the FHA "record of decision" received last week. The decision was announced late last month, but copies of the document were obtained only recently by the township and other interested parties.
NEWS
November 10, 2004 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Heralding the speedy completion of a new bridge on N.J. Route 70 to replace the one that washed away in July's floods, state Transportation Commissioner Jack Lettiere yesterday hinted that other projects also would be fast-tracked. He said his department was working on a plan to speed up transportation projects, notorious for sitting in the pipeline for years, but was not ready to release details. Lettiere spoke in Southampton at the ceremonial opening of the replacement bridge, completed last week, to carry Route 70 traffic over Friendship Creek.
NEWS
July 1, 1998
Those of you who assume government botches every task it touches might do well to take a drive on Interstate 95 this holiday weekend. You'll find that the bridge scorched and damaged May 24 in a horrible tanker-truck accident has been repaired, unclogging the interstate just in time for the holiday weekend. State officials can be excused for the orgy of mutual back-patting they indulged in Monday as the closed lanes reopened, more than two weeks ahead of schedule. Gov. Ridge, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, the Federal Highway Administration, the no-bid contractor who did the job and the suppliers who raced materials to the job site all showed admirable urgency in getting the highway back in fettle for the Fourth.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writerransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
IT'S A WRAP. City Councilman Mark Squilla on Thursday will not seek to override Mayor Nutter's veto of a bill that would allow for a huge digital advertising billboard on the Electric Factory, at 7th and Callowhill streets, near the Vine Street Expressway. "I don't want to move something forward without having something to counter [the administration's] claims," said Squilla, who requested feedback from the U.S. Department of Transportation after a letter from PennDOT and the Federal Highway Administration, clarifying violations if the billboard were to be erected, made him reconsider the bill.
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | By Cynthia Mayer and Jodi Enda, Inquirer Staff Writers
Up close, the two columns look like cottage cheese: Their bases are pitted with holes and, in some spots, steel rods show through like tendons under torn skin. They were supposed to hold up a bridge on the Blue Route, but because of their unusual texture, they must be patched or discarded. The pockmarked columns are among the most visible examples of serious flaws that have plagued the Blue Route since last year. In place after place along the new highway's 21.5-mile path, contractors have poured mottled columns and weak concrete, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration.
NEWS
July 9, 1999 | By Evan Halper, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Township officials yesterday asked a U.S. District Court judge to halt work on the Route 202 bypass in Bucks County until they can demonstrate what they say are improper and evasive actions in the planning of the project. The request, made in a motion to the court yesterday, is part of a lawsuit that seeks to stop the proposed $250 million, nine-mile highway that would run from Montgomery Township to Doylestown. The Federal Highway Administration and the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission are named as defendants.
NEWS
July 12, 1986
You ought to be ashamed of the article "Tooling down the interstate at a milestone" in the June 29 Travel section. It is morally irresponsible to glorify the attempt of two mindless drivers to set highway speed records across the United States with a radar detector (which they knew was illegal in some states) to evade arrest for speeding violations, and the highly risky use of a wedged-in squash racket as an improvised cruise control. If they want to risk their lives, let them participate in legitimate stock- car races - or jump off a bridge - but not imperil other motorists on public highways.
NEWS
August 3, 2007 | By Larry Eichel and Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Officials in Pennsylvania and New Jersey moved yesterday to check on the safety of the region's bridges in the aftermath of the Minneapolis disaster. In Harrisburg, PennDot was preparing a list of Pennsylvania bridges similar to the one that failed - in the event that the structure's design is found to have been central to its collapse. "None of us should jump to conclusions," Gov. Rendell told reporters in a conference call, while noting that Pennsylvania has 30 of these continuous deck truss bridges.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's roads may not be paved with gold, but they certainly are expensive. The state ranks highest in the nation in the cost of maintaining its roads, spending almost twice as much per mile as the number-two state, California, according to a new national study. New Jersey spent $1.2 million per mile a year to maintain and build its roads and bridges, compared to a national average of $145,000 per mile, the study said. The lowest spending was by South Carolina, which spent $31,379 per mile.
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NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's roads may not be paved with gold, but they certainly are expensive. The state ranks highest in the nation in the cost of maintaining its roads, spending almost twice as much per mile as the number-two state, California, according to a new national study. New Jersey spent $1.2 million per mile a year to maintain and build its roads and bridges, compared to a national average of $145,000 per mile, the study said. The lowest spending was by South Carolina, which spent $31,379 per mile.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
IT'S A WRAP. City Councilman Mark Squilla on Thursday will not seek to override Mayor Nutter's veto of a bill that would allow for a huge digital advertising billboard on the Electric Factory, at 7th and Callowhill streets, near the Vine Expressway. "I don't want to move something forward without having something to counter [the administration's] claims," said Squilla, who requested feedback from the U.S. Department of Transportation after a letter from PennDOT and the Federal Highway Administration, clarifying violations if the billboard were to be erected, made him reconsider the bill.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a state with more decrepit bridges than any other, Philadelphia stands out: The local area has all of Pennsylvania's 10 busiest troubled spans. And, facing a $4 billion budget deficit, Pennsylvania plans to repair 45 percent fewer structurally deficient bridges in 2011 than it did in 2010. Bridges are the most expensive links in the country's necklace of highways, and they are soaking up more of the road-repair budgets in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, and across the nation.
NEWS
October 31, 2009 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania's latest effort to place tolls on I-80 argues that the plan to use the money for statewide transportation projects should pass federal muster. In papers filed late Thursday, state officials defended a complex financial arrangement to lease I-80 to the Turnpike Commission and use the tolls as a "lease payment" to the Department of Transportation for use on road projects elsewhere. The filing emphasized that much of the money collected from I-80 would be used to improve that road.
NEWS
February 26, 2009 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If past is prologue, Driscoll Construction Co. of Montgomery County and South State Inc. of Cumberland County can expect the federal stimulus program to be very good to them. The construction firms, among the region's largest, had the most lucrative highway contracts in Southeastern Pennsylvania and South Jersey over the past four years. And they are among a handful of area companies well-positioned to receive construction work unleashed by the new federal law. Construction employment at Driscoll, based in Spring House, could double to about 300 if the company wins contracts for "shovel-ready" bridge and highway projects, president Michael Driscoll said Friday.
NEWS
August 10, 2007 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
All of New Jersey's 6,434 bridges are safe to drive on, though hundreds of them need billions of dollars in repairs, Gov. Corzine said yesterday. The governor said a review he ordered after last week's Minneapolis disaster showed 736 Garden State bridges that, like the Minnesota bridge, are "structurally deficient," meaning the bridge has at least one deteriorating structural component. Another 1,502 bridges are considered "functionally obsolete," meaning they do not meet current design standards.
NEWS
August 4, 2007 | By Tom Avril and Steve Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Within hours of the Minneapolis bridge disaster, Joseph Martin was on the phone with dozens of colleagues, all of them abuzz with questions as they looked at photos and videos of the steel wreckage. They felt horror, like anyone else, but also intellectual curiosity. Martin is a Drexel University professor, and he and his phone companions are civil engineers. Could one of their brethren be responsible? And if so, how? In interviews, Martin and others cautioned that finding the fatal flaw could take months.
NEWS
August 3, 2007 | By Larry Eichel and Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Officials in Pennsylvania and New Jersey moved yesterday to check on the safety of the region's bridges in the aftermath of the Minneapolis disaster. In Harrisburg, PennDot was preparing a list of Pennsylvania bridges similar to the one that failed - in the event that the structure's design is found to have been central to its collapse. "None of us should jump to conclusions," Gov. Rendell told reporters in a conference call, while noting that Pennsylvania has 30 of these continuous deck truss bridges.
NEWS
November 10, 2004 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Heralding the speedy completion of a new bridge on N.J. Route 70 to replace the one that washed away in July's floods, state Transportation Commissioner Jack Lettiere yesterday hinted that other projects also would be fast-tracked. He said his department was working on a plan to speed up transportation projects, notorious for sitting in the pipeline for years, but was not ready to release details. Lettiere spoke in Southampton at the ceremonial opening of the replacement bridge, completed last week, to carry Route 70 traffic over Friendship Creek.
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