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NEWS
November 10, 2011 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - Hoping to avert a costly legal battle over whether New Jerseyans should be able to bet on sports, U.S. Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. said he would introduce a bill Monday giving the state an exemption from a federal ban on sports betting. Pallone, a Democrat in the GOP-led House, said his bill would take effect immediately upon passage. How likely it is to get through Congress remains to be seen. It would represent the most direct path to approving sports betting in New Jersey.
NEWS
March 31, 1995 | by Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
A federal court judge yesterday ordered the state to make it easier for citizens to register to vote. The federal government sued the state for not implementing the federal "motor voter" law, which requires states to let citizens register to vote when they apply for driver's licenses, welfare and many other public services. The state opposed the law, arguing that it was unconstitutional for the federal government to order a state to implement the law. Bob Gentzel, a spokesman for Attorney General Ernie Preate, said the state also was concerned about a segment of the law that would stop the state from purging voters who hadn't voted in 2 1/2 years.
NEWS
February 2, 1995 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Pennsylvania yesterday drew another line in the sand in its fight with Washington over the motor-voter act when a Senate panel approved legislation that would circumvent a major provision of the federal law. By a 6-4 party-line vote, the Republican-led State Government Committee sent to the full Senate a bill that would not change state law on purging voters from registration rolls if they fail to vote in five straight elections. The federal law disallows voters to be dropped from the rolls, except when they die or move.
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
They met at a birthday party in 1990, were instantly smitten, and, after years of transatlantic romancing, got married in California in 2008. Today, they have four adopted children, ages 6 to 11, and a comfortable home in Harrisburg. But a sword of Damocles hangs over the couple, only one of whom is an American citizen. The other is French, and vulnerable to deportation. Under federal immigration law, married binational couples usually can fix this precarious situation with a family reunification petition, seeking a green card for the foreign-born spouse.
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
As investigators interviewed more witnesses and reviewed additional video footage of a Center City assault that sent a gay couple to the hospital last week, calls began anew for Pennsylvania to expand its hate-crimes law. A law enforcement source said that police were still taking statements from men and women involved in the Sept. 11 incident near Rittenhouse Square. The couple and police have said members of a group of 10 to 12 people hurled antigay slurs, held and punched the couple, and beat one man so severely he had to undergo surgery and have his jaw wired shut.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | Mensah M. Dean, Daily News Staff Writer
THOUGH SOME believe the Rev. Keith Goodman's bid to become mayor will fail because he doesn't meet the residency requirement, he has at least one prominent Philadelphian speaking up for him. Former Mayor John F. Street, now an adjunct professor at Temple University, this week proclaimed Goodman's candidacy to be good by him. "Under a liberal interpretation of the applicable provisions of Pennsylvania and municipal election law - which I...
NEWS
September 16, 2010 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
A Philadelphia man admitted in federal district court yesterday that he had sex with three underage females in Egypt from January 2004 to May 2007. Authorities said Omar Rashaad Bey, 33, of South Philadelphia, impregnated two of the victims when they were 15 and both bore Bey's sons at the same age. The births occurred in Egypt in February 2006 and March 2007. Federal law makes it a crime for a U.S. citizen to travel abroad to engage in illicit sex with persons under the age of 18. Bey allegedly entered into "purported Islamic marriages" with the two women he impregnated, according to prosecutors.
NEWS
August 1, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
In 2002, when a Pennsylvania State University football standout was accused of a dorm-room rape, the details were easy to come by. After all, the alleged assault became a national news story when coach Joe Paterno allowed the accused cornerback to suit up for a postseason game despite the pending criminal charges. The only place the curious couldn't find notice of the case was Penn State's federally mandated campus crime report. It was never listed, though that was required by federal law even though the player was ultimately acquitted.
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey lost another round to legalize sports betting in the state Tuesday when a federal appeals court decided the state law allowing it is trumped by federal law. Gov. Christie and lawmakers have been pushing for legalized sports gambling to revive the struggling casino industry. Legalized sports betting would allow betting on professional and college sporting events. In 2011, voters approved the New Jersey Sports Wagering Law, which was signed into law last year, but not implemented.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Nathan Gorenstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the second-biggest mistake of LaRue Y. Smith's life. Laid off from his job, Smith went to his computer, copied out a list of 7-Eleven stores in and around Philadelphia, grabbed a gun, and started sticking them up. The clerks and customers were terrified. Smith fired his revolver once, by accident, and almost shot himself in the leg. Police caught the former Marine eight weeks after his crimes had started in June 2007. Within hours, he confessed to a dozen robberies that netted him an unimpressive $2,510, plus cigarettes, chips, and soft drinks.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | Mensah M. Dean, Daily News Staff Writer
THOUGH SOME believe the Rev. Keith Goodman's bid to become mayor will fail because he doesn't meet the residency requirement, he has at least one prominent Philadelphian speaking up for him. Former Mayor John F. Street, now an adjunct professor at Temple University, this week proclaimed Goodman's candidacy to be good by him. "Under a liberal interpretation of the applicable provisions of Pennsylvania and municipal election law - which I...
BUSINESS
January 22, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Privacy advocates say they welcome the Obama administration's renewed emphasis on enhancing data security and protecting identity-theft victims, consumers who shop online, and children whose schools sell their personal information. But they are worried by details emerging from the White House - especially by drafts of a proposed federal data-breach law that would preempt stronger state laws. Breach disclosures mandated by states such as California are a main reason why Americans know about major data-security lapses in the first place.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - A decision is expected Friday on a lawsuit by the NCAA and professional sports leagues to block a New Jersey law that repeals a state ban on sports betting. U.S. District Judge Michael A. Shipp gave his time frame after hearing oral arguments in Trenton. Shipp previously granted a temporary restraining order sought by the leagues, which have accused New Jersey of trying to skirt a federal law that restricts sports betting to certain states. The state, however, points to language in a federal appellate-court decision issued last year that said New Jersey could repeal its ban. During Thursday's oral arguments, lawyers sparred over whether a law signed by Christie in October had simply repealed the state's prohibitions on sports betting or taken steps to authorize the practice.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A BILL to eliminate a little-known carve-out in state law that allows a person in a labor dispute to stalk, harass or threaten another person in the dispute is expected to die Monday when the House concludes voting this session. The House is not planning to vote on a Senate-amended version of House Bill 1154 during its final voting day. State Rep. Ron Miller, R-York, who sponsored the bill, and others have had concerns about the Senate-amended bill. Yesterday, he said it's "unfortunate" that the bill will die. "There should not be a loophole in the law. There should not be an exemption.
NEWS
October 10, 2014
NEW JERSEY is heading to federal court this month in a bid to allow its struggling casinos and racetracks to offer betting on sports events. We wish New Jersey good luck, but most experts feel that the odds are against the state succeeding. States have broad powers to sanction and regulate most kinds of gambling, but a federal law passed in 1992 blocks them from making book on sports events. That is, the law blocks most states. The Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act provided exemptions for four states that already had laws permitting sports betting - Nevada, Delaware, Oregon and Montana.
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
As investigators interviewed more witnesses and reviewed additional video footage of a Center City assault that sent a gay couple to the hospital last week, calls began anew for Pennsylvania to expand its hate-crimes law. A law enforcement source said that police were still taking statements from men and women involved in the Sept. 11 incident near Rittenhouse Square. The couple and police have said members of a group of 10 to 12 people hurled antigay slurs, held and punched the couple, and beat one man so severely he had to undergo surgery and have his jaw wired shut.
NEWS
August 29, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A FEDERAL judge has dismissed part of a lawsuit filed this year by Chaka "Chip" Fattah Jr. against the IRS, FBI and U.S. Department of Justice but allowed another part of the suit to proceed. U.S. District Judge Timothy Savage's order, filed yesterday, followed a motion by the government's attorney in Washington to dismiss claims in the suit and to dismiss the FBI and DOJ as defendants. Savage agreed to dismiss the FBI and DOJ as defendants because the time period allowed under the law to sue them had passed.
NEWS
June 25, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey Senate Republicans blocked Democrats' attempt to override Gov. Christie's conditional veto of proposed Hurricane Sandy "Bill of Rights" legislation Monday, a move Senate President Stephen Sweeney denounced as "sickening. " The bill passed both houses of the Democrat-controlled Legislature in March without a single "no" vote, but Christie, a Republican, conditionally vetoed it in May and sent revisions back to lawmakers. The governor said parts of the bill violated federal law and had "unquantifiable administrative costs.
NEWS
June 24, 2014
SIGNE WILKINSON'S cartoon (June 17) illustrates the situation in the entire Middle East. I hope President Obama is smart enough to get us out of their problems. We didn't break it in the first place, as many of those who advocate American participation claim. Middle Eastern society has been broken for longer than the United States has existed. In the history of that region, peace has been a rare situation, always imposed by a government strong enough to prevent people who would otherwise be shooting each other from doing so. It can't be any different when the majority of people would shoot each other over religious differences that would be considered trivial by anyone who had any education that involved more than one book.
NEWS
June 20, 2014
IN A RARE victory for common sense in the gun debate, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that the federal ban on "straw" purchases can be enforced even if the person who eventually gets the gun is legally allowed to have one. The 5-4 decision was written by Justice Elena Kagan. Justice Anthony Kennedy, a frequent swing vote, voted with the majority. Kagan found that any other reading of the statute, which prevents someone from buying a gun for someone else, would gut the federal law. The case involved a Virginia man who bought a Glock handgun for his uncle who lived in Pennsylvania.
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