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NEWS
November 10, 2011 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - Hoping to avert a costly legal battle over whether New Jerseyans should be able to bet on sports, U.S. Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. said he would introduce a bill Monday giving the state an exemption from a federal ban on sports betting. Pallone, a Democrat in the GOP-led House, said his bill would take effect immediately upon passage. How likely it is to get through Congress remains to be seen. It would represent the most direct path to approving sports betting in New Jersey.
NEWS
March 31, 1995 | by Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
A federal court judge yesterday ordered the state to make it easier for citizens to register to vote. The federal government sued the state for not implementing the federal "motor voter" law, which requires states to let citizens register to vote when they apply for driver's licenses, welfare and many other public services. The state opposed the law, arguing that it was unconstitutional for the federal government to order a state to implement the law. Bob Gentzel, a spokesman for Attorney General Ernie Preate, said the state also was concerned about a segment of the law that would stop the state from purging voters who hadn't voted in 2 1/2 years.
NEWS
February 2, 1995 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Pennsylvania yesterday drew another line in the sand in its fight with Washington over the motor-voter act when a Senate panel approved legislation that would circumvent a major provision of the federal law. By a 6-4 party-line vote, the Republican-led State Government Committee sent to the full Senate a bill that would not change state law on purging voters from registration rolls if they fail to vote in five straight elections. The federal law disallows voters to be dropped from the rolls, except when they die or move.
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
They met at a birthday party in 1990, were instantly smitten, and, after years of transatlantic romancing, got married in California in 2008. Today, they have four adopted children, ages 6 to 11, and a comfortable home in Harrisburg. But a sword of Damocles hangs over the couple, only one of whom is an American citizen. The other is French, and vulnerable to deportation. Under federal immigration law, married binational couples usually can fix this precarious situation with a family reunification petition, seeking a green card for the foreign-born spouse.
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey lost another round to legalize sports betting in the state Tuesday when a federal appeals court decided the state law allowing it is trumped by federal law. Gov. Christie and lawmakers have been pushing for legalized sports gambling to revive the struggling casino industry. Legalized sports betting would allow betting on professional and college sporting events. In 2011, voters approved the New Jersey Sports Wagering Law, which was signed into law last year, but not implemented.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania is the latest state to investigate Planned Parenthood affiliates and find no wrongdoing involving the disposal or use of fetal tissue. In fact, the state's clinics do not even provide tissue for research, the inquiry found. But the finding isn't satisfying Republican legislators critical of the organization. Planned Parenthood Federation of America has been on the defensive since July, when antiabortion activists began releasing secretly recorded videos showing the organization's executives candidly talking about supplying fetal tissue donated by abortion patients for medical research.
NEWS
July 17, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former President Bill Clinton told the NAACP convention here Wednesday that he was wrong to sign a law that resulted in mass incarcerations of nonviolent drug offenders, a day after President Obama called for changes to laws that have filled prisons with minorities over the last two decades. Appearing on the final day of the civil rights group's annual meeting, Clinton spoke with contrition. "I signed a bill that made the problem worse, and I want to admit it," he said. The law so severely toughened federal sentences, and set a tone for state courts to follow, that prisons swelled - with disproportionate numbers of African American and Latino inmates, Clinton said.
NEWS
April 20, 2013 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - How it affects children will be one factor the Justice Department weighs as it determines how to respond to the legalization of marijuana in Washington state and Colorado, Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. told Congress on Thursday. "I think among the kinds of things we will have to consider is the impact on children," along with factors such as violence connected to trafficking and organized crime, Holder told a House Appropriations subcommittee. He commented in response to questions about ballot initiatives legalizing the drug.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Nathan Gorenstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the second-biggest mistake of LaRue Y. Smith's life. Laid off from his job, Smith went to his computer, copied out a list of 7-Eleven stores in and around Philadelphia, grabbed a gun, and started sticking them up. The clerks and customers were terrified. Smith fired his revolver once, by accident, and almost shot himself in the leg. Police caught the former Marine eight weeks after his crimes had started in June 2007. Within hours, he confessed to a dozen robberies that netted him an unimpressive $2,510, plus cigarettes, chips, and soft drinks.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Meg Kinnard, Associated Press
COLUMBIA, S.C. - The U.S. Supreme Court this week will hear an emotional challenge to federal law on the adoption of Native American children, with several states, tribes, and children's welfare groups lining up to support current rules. The case involves a South Carolina couple fighting for custody of their adopted daughter who, after a court battle, was returned to her biological father in Oklahoma. At issue is the Indian Child Welfare Act, passed in 1978 because of the high number of Indian children being removed from their homes by public and private agencies.
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NEWS
August 22, 2016
Jonathan Turley is the Shapiro professor of public interest law at George Washington University Donald Trump's newly proposed ideological test for immigrants - one that he characterized as "extreme vetting" in a speech Monday - has renewed debate over immigration reform in the presidential election. It's a debate worth having, and there are plenty of valid questions to be raised about his proposal. This is one occasion, however, when Trump may have the law on his side. As a general proposition, a litmus test for new immigrants isn't unconstitutional or even unprecedented.
NEWS
August 16, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Columnist
And now, an update from the world of - The election is rigged! They're stealing your vote! Fraud, fraud, everywhere! The election is not rigged. Your vote has not been stolen. The conspiracy theorists who claim these many frauds still can't show us any proof. This, despite claims from Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, who predicted during a rally in Altoona on Friday that the only way he can lose the vote in Pennsylvania "is if cheating goes on. " There's a problem with Trump's math.
NEWS
July 23, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Abbe F. Fletman is set to decide whether the Democratic National Convention host committee's fund-raising reports must be made public. The Philadelphia 2016 Host Committee is fighting the release of the quarterly fund-raising reports it is required to file with the Philadelphia Authority for Industrial Development (PAID), the public agency that guaranteed it a $15 million line of credit. Last month, the state Office of Open Records ordered those reports released to the public.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Jonathan Tamari, and Chris Brennan, STAFF WRITERS
Chaka Fattah resigned his U.S. House seat effective immediately Thursday, a day after Republican leaders balked at his plan to remain in Congress for three months following his conviction on federal corruption charges. In a letter to Speaker Paul Ryan, the Philadelphia Democrat wrote that he had hoped to resign Oct. 3 - a day before his sentencing - to ensure an orderly transition. "However, out of respect for the entire House leadership, and so as not to cause a distraction from the House's work for the people, I have changed my effective date," the letter said.
NEWS
March 12, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, STAFF WRITER
Temple University Thursday appointed a new senior adviser to oversee sexual assault complaints, as well as diversity and equity issues on the 39,000-student campus. "Campus sexual misconduct is one of the most important issues facing higher education today, and it is imperative that we take immediate steps to improve reporting of these incidents and reduce the incidence of sexual assault on our campus," Temple President Neil D. Theobald said. The appointment is the final piece that was recommended last summer by a university task force on the handling of sexual misconduct cases on campus, Theobald said.
NEWS
March 5, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel and Jason Laughlin, STAFF WRITERS
SEPTA wants a federal judge to issue a restraining order against a lower Bucks County municipality that the transit agency contends has imposed "exorbitant" fees and "excessive" regulations that are delaying a $36 million upgrade of its Levittown station. In a lawsuit filed Wednesday, the transit agency asked the court to bar the Borough of Tullytown from asserting any authority over the work at the station, which began in November. More than $250,000 in borough fees and other "regulatory burdens" have been preventing SEPTA from finishing the project, it claims.
NEWS
March 2, 2016
By Mark Krikorian Sanctuary cities are a menace to public safety. A recent move in the House of Representatives to cut their funding is long overdue. There are more than 300 sanctuary jurisdictions nationwide, including cities like New York, counties like Chicago's Cook County, and even whole states like California. These jurisdictions refuse to cooperate with immigration authorities and release deportable criminals back onto the streets. In 2014, more than 9,000 criminals who entered the country illegally and whom the Department of Homeland Security wanted to deport were released instead because of local sanctuary policies, according to the department's records.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Lawyers for professional sports leagues and the State of New Jersey clashed in oral arguments Wednesday before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in a case that could decide the fate of a years-long effort by New Jersey to institute sports betting. The case features two of the nation's top legal guns, Paul Clement, who represented the sports leagues, and Theodore Olson, who argued on behalf of New Jersey. Both served at different times as U.S. solicitor general under President George W. Bush.
NEWS
January 16, 2016 | Staff Report
A Philadelphia man faces a stiffer possible penalty after being charged Thursday under federal law with using a gun during a pair of robberies. Samuel Robinson, 29, of Philadelphia, was charged in a five-count federal indictment with robbing two Metro PCS stores in Mayfair and Hunting Park on Oct. 28, the U.S. Attorney's Office said. He could be sentenced from 32 years to life in prison if convicted of violating two counts of the Hobbs Act listed against him in an indictment.
NEWS
January 14, 2016
FOUR MORE DOWN, so many more to go. The Federal Trade Commission recently smacked down four debt-collection outfits and their affiliates that the agency said engaged in abusive practices. This latest round of action is part of a federal, state, and local effort around the country to target deceptive debt collectors. I've personally been on the other end of a telephone call with a collector trying to bully me into paying a debt I didn't owe. The person was attempting to collect some medical payment that he claimed was owed by my deceased brother.
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