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Federal Poverty Level

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BUSINESS
December 2, 1994 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Public leaders and local utilities yesterday urged eligible residents to register for a federally funded program that provides winter energy assistance. The program, Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (Liheap), last year distributed cash grants averaging $158 to 75,000 Philadelphia households. The money is paid directly to utilities or oil and coal dealers. Another 32,209 Philadelphia households received one-time crisis grants last year. Applications will be taken starting Monday through Jan. 20. The grants will be distributed until the funds are exhausted, said David M. Boonin, a Philadelphia Gas Commission official leading a campaign to get eligible residents to apply.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It costs a lot of money to live in the Philadelphia region without government assistance - as much as $70,000 a year or more for a family of four in some places. That's the word from a study being released Tuesday. It measures what it costs a family of two adults with one preschooler and one school-age child to live in the region, taking into account the costs of housing, child care, food, transportation, health care, and taxes. In the city, a family of four needs $61,199 a year to meet basic needs without public assistance such as welfare or food stamps, says the latest version of the Self Sufficiency Standard, a measure calculated every two years by the University of Washington for PathWays PA, a Delaware County antipoverty advocacy group that focuses on women and children.
NEWS
July 14, 1993 | By Wanda Motley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Robert Zausner contributed to this article
The Casey administration for the third consecutive year faces the possibility that it might have to scale back home-heating grants for thousands of needy Pennsylvanians this winter. Administration officials expect the federal Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program will provide the state between $15 million and $24 million less this fiscal year than the $97 million received last year. Lt. Gov. Mark S. Singel, who is serving as acting governor, said yesterday that officials seemed divided over how to handle the reduction.
NEWS
May 5, 2013
The biggest changes in health insurance in a generation are set to take effect this year and next. Robert I. Field, a law and public health professor at Drexel University, answers questions about the changes stemming from the health law. Insurance exchanges are coming. What are they? An exchange is a marketplace where you can buy health insurance for you and your family. Most people will access them online, but there will be offices for those who prefer human contact.
NEWS
October 30, 2007 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
On a day when President Bush was in the area for a political fund-raising luncheon, five Democratic members of Congress came together to ask him not to veto a revised children's health insurance bill. They gathered in the playground of the Parent-Infant Center in West Philadelphia to underline their support for the reauthorization and expansion of the program known as SCHIP. "It's been working, and we want to extend it to another four million children, which would be 10 million total," said U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz (D., Pa.)
NEWS
April 15, 2011 | By Beth Defalco, Associated Press
TRENTON - The federal government has agreed to pay for half of New Jersey's Medicaid program for low-income, childless adults through 2013, saving the state more than $300 million. The 50 percent matching grant, announced Thursday by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is effective immediately and runs through the end of 2013. Medicaid is funded with state and federal dollars. Under health-care reform, the program will expand to allow for coverage of more adults starting in 2014 and will be fully funded by the federal government for the first few years.
NEWS
November 10, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Some people - likely those close to the federal poverty level - will be able to find insurance plans on the Affordable Care Act marketplace that are free. That's because subsidies help cover the costs, and they rise for poorer applicants. As many as 715,000 Pennsylvanians - or more than half of commonwealth residents shopping for insurance on the marketplace - are eligible for subsidies, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation report. But navigators, insurers, and industry analysts are urging people to consider their overall needs carefully before choosing a plan and not to be seduced by the idea of no or very low monthly premiums.
NEWS
April 13, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Tennessee, welfare benefits may be reduced for families whose children get bad grades in school. The plan, laid out in a bill that has cleared committees in the state's House and Senate, touched off an uproar. Quickly, the legislation was amended to say the money would not be cut if the parents attended parenting classes or got tutors for their children. Still, anger persists about the bill. No such bill exists in Pennsylvania or New Jersey. But 15 cosponsors in the Pennsylvania legislature are backing a bill by State Sen. John Wozniak (D., Cambria)
BUSINESS
June 5, 1989 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly three years after government, business and health-care officials began to explore ways of providing medical services to one million Pennsylvanians without health insurance, the state still has no plan. Indeed, the only proposals even submitted to the legislature were sent back to the officials who drafted them as inadequate. And that was nearly a year ago. Meanwhile, the meetings and debates continued in Harrisburg. Last week, one legislator, Donald W. Dorr (R., York)
NEWS
November 18, 1992 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
After years in the making, an agreement was concluded yesterday on legislation to provide state-subsidized health insurance for children from lower-income families not covered by their insurance. However, because of concerns about potentially skyrocketing costs in future years, the measure was limited to children 12 and younger and the program capped at a maximum $20 million yearly cost. "It's scaled down," said Rep. Allen G. Kukovich (D., Westmoreland), who was the legislation's chief sponsor and first introduced a health-care bill in 1990.
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NEWS
November 10, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Some people - likely those close to the federal poverty level - will be able to find insurance plans on the Affordable Care Act marketplace that are free. That's because subsidies help cover the costs, and they rise for poorer applicants. As many as 715,000 Pennsylvanians - or more than half of commonwealth residents shopping for insurance on the marketplace - are eligible for subsidies, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation report. But navigators, insurers, and industry analysts are urging people to consider their overall needs carefully before choosing a plan and not to be seduced by the idea of no or very low monthly premiums.
NEWS
May 5, 2013
The biggest changes in health insurance in a generation are set to take effect this year and next. Robert I. Field, a law and public health professor at Drexel University, answers questions about the changes stemming from the health law. Insurance exchanges are coming. What are they? An exchange is a marketplace where you can buy health insurance for you and your family. Most people will access them online, but there will be offices for those who prefer human contact.
NEWS
April 13, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Tennessee, welfare benefits may be reduced for families whose children get bad grades in school. The plan, laid out in a bill that has cleared committees in the state's House and Senate, touched off an uproar. Quickly, the legislation was amended to say the money would not be cut if the parents attended parenting classes or got tutors for their children. Still, anger persists about the bill. No such bill exists in Pennsylvania or New Jersey. But 15 cosponsors in the Pennsylvania legislature are backing a bill by State Sen. John Wozniak (D., Cambria)
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It costs a lot of money to live in the Philadelphia region without government assistance - as much as $70,000 a year or more for a family of four in some places. That's the word from a study being released Tuesday. It measures what it costs a family of two adults with one preschooler and one school-age child to live in the region, taking into account the costs of housing, child care, food, transportation, health care, and taxes. In the city, a family of four needs $61,199 a year to meet basic needs without public assistance such as welfare or food stamps, says the latest version of the Self Sufficiency Standard, a measure calculated every two years by the University of Washington for PathWays PA, a Delaware County antipoverty advocacy group that focuses on women and children.
NEWS
January 10, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania plans to make the amount of food stamps that people receive contingent on the assets they possess - an unexpected move that bucks national trends and places the commonwealth among a minority of states. Specifically, the Department of Public Welfare said that as of May 1, people under 60 with more than $2,000 in savings and other assets would no longer be eligible for food stamps. For people over 60, the limit would be $3,250. Houses and retirement benefits would be exempt from being counted as assets.
NEWS
April 15, 2011 | By Beth Defalco, Associated Press
TRENTON - The federal government has agreed to pay for half of New Jersey's Medicaid program for low-income, childless adults through 2013, saving the state more than $300 million. The 50 percent matching grant, announced Thursday by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is effective immediately and runs through the end of 2013. Medicaid is funded with state and federal dollars. Under health-care reform, the program will expand to allow for coverage of more adults starting in 2014 and will be fully funded by the federal government for the first few years.
NEWS
March 13, 2009 | By Jonathan Tamari INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Nearly 500,0000 people with low incomes would pay up to $10 a month for prescription drugs under Gov. Corzine's budget proposal. An additional 7,500 who receive free drugs for HIV and AIDS would pay between $6 and $30 per prescription as part of the budget-cutting measures detailed in documents released yesterday. The two changes would cost the prescription beneficiaries - and save the state - $6 million to help balance Corzine's $30 billion budget proposal. Ending coverage of medicine for erectile dysfunction under Medicaid and the state senior-citizens prescription program would save an additional $3.3 million.
NEWS
December 20, 2007 | By Craig R. McCoy INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Joining Pennsylvania and a handful of other states seeking to make sure all children have health insurance, New Jersey is about to offer low-cost coverage to youngsters from middle-class families. Starting Jan. 1, the program will cover uninsured children whose parents earn too much to qualify for other government health-care programs. The plan is to offer coverage to families no matter what their income, provided their youngsters have gone without coverage for at least six months.
NEWS
October 30, 2007 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
On a day when President Bush was in the area for a political fund-raising luncheon, five Democratic members of Congress came together to ask him not to veto a revised children's health insurance bill. They gathered in the playground of the Parent-Infant Center in West Philadelphia to underline their support for the reauthorization and expansion of the program known as SCHIP. "It's been working, and we want to extend it to another four million children, which would be 10 million total," said U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz (D., Pa.)
NEWS
August 2, 1998
It sounds fairly simple. If Pennsylvania could create a single form to sign up needy children for the state's complex health-insurance programs, many more of the state's 185,000 uninsured children might be covered. At least 12 states have set up one-stop shopping for children's insurance programs. But Pennsylvania still forces parents to plow through two systems of red tape: the state-run Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and Medicaid, the more comprehensive state/federal plan for the poorest kids.
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