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Federal Prison

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NEWS
February 4, 1994 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard H. Rossmiller, the man considered the biggest individual borrower in the nation's savings-and-loan scandal and to whom Montgomery County's Hill Financial Savings Association lent more than $100 million before collapsing, was sentenced yesterday to more than four years in prison and ordered to make restitution of $10 million. "You have a lot of talent, you have ambition," U.S. District Judge Joseph L. McGlynn Jr. told Rossmiller. "I don't think there's any question that you can be a successful, productive citizen when you again get that opportunity.
NEWS
May 15, 1990 | BY ANN SCHWARTZMAN
The city and the state need to adopt and implement a strong earned time/ good program to begin to combat the escalating prison crisis. If the city does not want to be limited by the provisions in a state bill, it may have only weeks in which to act. Earned time/good time works by providing additional control to corrections staff and incentives to inmates to learn societal rules and new skills. Also it helps combat overcrowding in a responsible, systemized way. Earned time/good time is not an automatic release, nor is it a guarantee.
NEWS
February 28, 2013
An inmate has killed a guard at a federal prison in Northeastern Pennsylvania. Prison officials say that Monday night at the Canaan penitentiary in Waymart, about 20 miles northeast of Scranton, Correctional Officer Eric Williams was working in a housing unit when an inmate attacked him with a homemade weapon. Williams was rushed to a hospital and pronounced dead at 11:30 p.m. The Bureau of Prisons says Williams is the first federal corrections officer killed on the job in nearly five years.
NEWS
October 1, 1997 | By Larry Lewis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The clock struck midnight yesterday for a New Jersey business executive who used $12 million he embezzled from his employer over eight years to amass one of the world's finest collections of antique European timepieces. Francis X. Vitale Jr., 53, who was a senior vice president of the Engelhard Corp. in Iselin in Middlesex County, pleaded guilty in federal court in Camden to diverting the money and buying precious old clocks. Prosecutors said Vitale owned more than 140 rare clocks, some dating to the 17th century, some worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.
NEWS
September 18, 1999 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
The U.S. Bureau of Prisons is looking for more than a few good men - and women - to staff its new federal jail at 7th and Arch streets. The 11-story, $90 million Philadelphia Metropolitan Detention Center, scheduled to be completed in December, will need at least 301 workers, said Florentino Morlote, executive assistant at the center. To fill some of those positions, the bureau is holding a job fair Tuesday from noon to 6 p.m. at the Clarion Suites, 1010 Race St. "We're hoping to fill about 55 percent of the positions, 165 jobs, with people who live in and near the community where the detention center is," said Morlote.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
A former corrections officer was sentenced today to one year and one day in prison for accepting $3,600 in bribes to smuggle contraband into a federal prison in South Jersey. U.S. District Judge Renée Marie Bumb imposed the sentence on Job Brown, 39, of Bridgeton, in a hearing at federal court in Camden. Brown previously pleaded guilty to one count of receipt of bribes by a public official. The U.S. Attorney's Office said Brown, an officer at the Fairton federal prison, accepted the bribes to smuggle cigarettes and vitamin supplements to an inmate at the facility in Fairfield Township, Cumberland County.
NEWS
October 25, 2012 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Chester County man who stoked terrorism fears when he crashed his Jeep through a locked fence and onto runways at Philadelphia International Airport in March was sentenced Wednesday to 16 months in federal prison. Kenneth R. Mazik, 25, of Chadds Ford, blamed the March 1 incident on what he said were delusions caused by an addiction to the behavioral drug Adderall. "I was operating in a different space and time," he told U.S. District Judge Mitchell S. Goldberg. The judge acknowledged that Mazik was possibly in a drug-induced psychosis at the time.
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | By Troy Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Convicted mobster Salvatore "Chuckie" Merlino - the father of former Philadelphia mob boss Joseph "Skinny Joey" Merlino - died Monday in a federal prison in Fort Worth, Texas. The elder Merlino was 73 and had spent the last quarter century behind bars. The federal Bureau of Prisons listed his potential release date as August 2016. Local attorney Joseph Santaguida confirmed Merlino's death on Tuesday, but offered little other information. He said simply that Merlino had been "sick for a while.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | Staff Report
A Bucks County doctor has been sentenced to 34 months in federal prison for operating a $5 million diet drug "pill mill" in Northeast Philadelphia. Christopher Vassalluzzo, 47, of New Hope, pleaded guilty in April to conspiracy to distribute controlled substances, mail fraud, conspiracy to commit mail fraud, structuring, aggravated structuring, conspiracy to commit tax evasion, and tax evasion. The U.S. Attorney's Office said Vassalluzzo ran a "pill mill" from his office in the Holme Circle section, netting more than $5 million by illegally distributing prescriptions for controlled substance diet drugs.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former Camden City police officer who admitted his role in a corrupt antidrug unit and cooperated with federal authorities was sentenced today to 46 months in prison. Jason Stetser was the last of four former police officers convicted as a result of the investigation to learn his fate. The case has resulted in payouts totaling more than $3.8 million to some of those who had been arrested by the rogue group. Standing before U.S. District Court Judge Robert Kugler in Camden, Stetser, 34, apologized to all he had hurt and said, "I am ashamed of my actions.
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NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 25-year-old Chester woman was sentenced to more than 15 years in federal prison on Wednesday for operating a prostitution business involving young females, including one minor. Rashidah Brice pleaded guilty on Aug. 20, 2013, to charges of sex trafficking of a minor by force and two counts of sex trafficking by force. With her codefendant - Christian Dior Womack, 29 - Brice, who also uses the names "Camille" and "Milly," ran a prostitution business in Philadelphia and elsewhere. Brice and Womack recruited young females to work for them as prostitutes between May 25, 2012, and Feb. 3, 2013.
NEWS
September 27, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
After he served his time in federal prison for cheating on his taxes, Sam Kuttab vowed that his days of skating close to the edge were over. "I made a promise to family, my kids," Kuttab said last year. "I do not plan to make another mistake. " Now Kuttab is under federal criminal scrutiny again, a decade after he spent 22 months behind bars for a scheme to evade $1.2 million in taxes. And this time, the Wyncote man is smack in the middle of the FBI's latest probe of Philadelphia judges.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
TWO WEEKS AGO, former Traffic Court Judge Robert Mulgrew may have been breathing a little easier after a federal jury acquitted him of major charges related to an alleged ticket-fixing scandal, although the panel found him guilty of perjury. While Mulgrew, 57, doesn't yet know what sentence he will receive in that case for having lied to a federal grand jury, he learned yesterday that time behind bars will be part of his near future. U.S. District Judge C. Darnell Jones II sentenced Mulgrew to 2 1/2 years in federal prison for defrauding a South Philly nonprofit that he had helped run. "Too often, we are of the mind that public corruption exists, so what?"
NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of two men charged in the Aug. 18, 2012, robbery and slaying of Philadelphia Police Officer Moses Walker pleaded guilty Thursday in a deal that lets him escape life in prison if he cooperates in the prosecution of the alleged shooter. Chancier McFarland, 21, of North Philadelphia, pleaded guilty to third-degree murder in the predawn shooting of Walker, 40, as he walked to a bus stop after finishing his shift as a turnkey in the 22d District. Walker, a 19-year veteran of the force, was fatally shot about 6 a.m. Surveillance video showed him being confronted by two armed men. McFarland also pleaded guilty to participating in two strong-arm robberies of corner grocery stores on Feb. 28, 2011.
NEWS
May 11, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
LAMAR RAYSON, who has lived in federal prison since 2007, wasn't going anywhere for decades. But yesterday, he learned that he's likely to die behind bars. Philadelphia Common Pleas Judge Alice Dubow sentenced him to 37 1/2 to 75 years in state prison for a 2004 Christmas Eve home-invasion robbery and rape in Wissinoming, Pa. Rayson, 29, will begin serving that sentence after he completes a 32-year sentence in federal prison that he received for his role in five armed robberies of city businesses in 2005, and a 2006 armed carjacking in Germantown.
NEWS
May 1, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Add U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno to the long list of men mystified by the jet-setting identity thief Jocelyn Kirsch. Not for her fake flowing tresses, which prosecutors alleged seven years ago she bought with other people's money, and not for the bikini shots, which were plastered across tabloid covers after her initial 2007 arrest. No, the federal judge was more puzzled Tuesday with a question at Kirsch's core as he sentenced her to five months in prison Tuesday for violating her federal probation with a simple stretch of shoplifting.
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
HER LONG, WAVY brown hair pulled back into a ponytail, a bespectacled Jocelyn Kirsch entered a federal courtroom in Philadelphia yesterday wearing a short-sleeved dark-green prison jumpsuit, her hands cuffed behind her back. The convicted identity thief - one half of the famed duo nicknamed "Bonnie and Clyde" - appeared plain, but still pretty, without makeup. As she sat in the holding area for defendants in the fifth-floor courtroom, the section normally considered the jury box, she smiled at one of her attorneys, Ronald Greenblatt.
NEWS
April 17, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Community College of Philadelphia, Glenn Martin, a neatly dressed middle-aged man, spoke eloquently Tuesday about how he turned his life around after serving six years in prison for drug crimes in New York. Martin, who earned a college degree while behind bars, said he was inspired to change his life by a correctional officer, fellow inmates, and others. "I'm not the exception. I am someone exposed to exceptional opportunities," Martin told about 200 people attending a daylong program on incarceration sponsored by the Mural Arts Program.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE SWEET nothings that lovers share, the passionate embraces and deep kisses that seem to slow down time, all go by the wayside when the clock's ticking and the guards are watching in a prison visiting room. "We can hug and kiss quickly when we first see each other, but that's it," said Kate Noxel, whose fiance, Jacob Angelilli, is incarcerated in Pennsylvania. "We're not allowed to hold hands. " As often as she can, Noxel drives about 80 miles, alone, from her home in Pottstown to see Angelilli at Camp Hill State Correctional Institution near Harrisburg, where she's searched and scrutinized.
NEWS
January 8, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
IN A BLACK headscarf, short-sleeved green prison jumpsuit and white sneakers, Colleen LaRose, at 4-foot-9 and slightly pudgy, looked more like an elderly nun than a terrorist. The Montgomery County woman known as "Jihad Jane" gave a toothy smile to a few acquaintances in the courtroom at her sentencing hearing yesterday. According to assistant federal defender Mark Wilson, LaRose suffered a life of abuse that led her to travel to Europe after finding validity with Muslim extremists.
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