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Federal Response

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NEWS
February 24, 2006 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The White House acknowledged yesterday that the response to Hurricane Katrina was botched because federal officials were confused, poorly prepared, and communicated badly. But instead of an overhaul of the Homeland Security bureaucracy, officials proposed 125 smaller fixes. The 11 most urgent recommendations, which the White House said were needed before the hurricane season starts June 1, had been routine practices by the Federal Emergency Management Agency before it was folded into the Department of Homeland Security, two former FEMA directors said yesterday.
NEWS
September 9, 2005
IF THE BUSH administration and its allies had spent a tenth of the energy they are wasting on avoiding responsibility for the debacle in New Orleans and surrounding areas, more people would be alive today. Instead, the administration continues to spin all sorts of excuses and allegations, without benefit of the truth. And the GOP is now trying to sell to the American public an investigation into this mess that seems tailor-made to whitewash the fatal errors in judgment from the White House.
NEWS
September 22, 2005
Only an independent inquiry is likely to produce a credible accounting of the mistakes made after Hurricane Katrina blitzed New Orleans and other parts of the Gulf Coast. The federal investigation of the response to this natural disaster needs to come from a bipartisan commission without allegiance to either the White House or Capitol Hill. Democratic and Republican leaders are at odds over the composition of a joint legislative panel to study how FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, failed so badly.
NEWS
September 23, 2005 | By Shannon McCaffrey and Alison Young INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As a powerful new storm bore down on the Gulf Coast, Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff yesterday called Rita an "incident of national significance," paving the way for a massive federal response if state and local officials are overwhelmed. He also named a top Coast Guard officer to coordinate the federal action in Texas. With Katrina, Chertoff waited to take those critical steps until about 36 hours after the hurricane struck and water began pouring into New Orleans.
NEWS
September 15, 2005 | By Jonathan S. Landay, Alison Young and Shannon McCaffrey INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The federal official with the power to mobilize a massive federal response to Hurricane Katrina was Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff, not the FEMA chief who resigned earlier this week, federal documents show. Even before the storm struck the Gulf Coast, Chertoff could have ordered federal agencies into action without any request from state or local officials. Federal Emergency Management Agency chief Michael Brown had only limited authority to do so until about 36 hours after the storm hit, when Chertoff designated him the "principal federal official" in charge of Katrina.
NEWS
September 13, 2005
WHILE THE storm itself was no one's fault, the planning leading up to and the handling afterward is. Money that should have been used to strengthen/rebuild levees was diverted to other things. These states know they face hurricanes every storm season. While the local responses should have been better organized and executed, the federal response was even worse so because they're - FEDERAL! The spinmasters in the Republican Party are trying to blame everyone but themselves (including victims)
NEWS
January 26, 1996
Republicans and real comedians yukked it up when Big Government shut down twice for lack of funding. As if anybody noticed, right? The public eventually got fed up with the tactic, but that would have happened faster if The Blizzard had hit a few weeks sooner. That's because the agency that handles disaster relief was among the unfunded. Now that millions of Americans have been snowed under or flooded out, they can better appreciate the role of the federal government. Lately, Mother Nature has mocked Republican rhetoric that scorns Washington and exalts state and local government and the private sector.
NEWS
September 4, 2005 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Americans have watched Katrina's floodwaters ravage New Orleans, they also have witnessed a striking portrayal of class and race. Those left behind in the flooded city, floating dead in the water or waiting fearfully for help, are overwhelmingly black and poor. That often unmentioned but unavoidable fact has many black Americans wondering why more help was not forthcoming - before and after the hurricane. Frustrated by Washington's response, black mayors have set up their own relief efforts.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER POLITICS WRITER
TAMPA - When Republican National Chairman Reince Priebus banged the oversize gavel to open his party's nominating convention Monday afternoon, it was hard to miss the images CNN was displaying across the bottom of the screen: a scarlet storm symbol spinning in the Gulf of Mexico, a fever chart marking wind speed, and a bulletin crawl informing viewers that the governor of Alabama had just declared a state of emergency. That moment illustrates the dilemma facing the GOP as Tropical Storm Isaac hurtles toward the Gulf Coast, forecast to become a hurricane and threatening devastation - replete with reminders of Hurricane Katrina - at the very time the party needs its convention, which gets fully under way here Tuesday, to sell Mitt Romney to the nation.
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
TAMPA - When Republican National Chairman Reince Priebus banged the gavel to open his party's nominating convention Monday afternoon, it was hard to miss the images CNN was displaying across the bottom of the screen: a scarlet storm symbol spinning in the Gulf of Mexico, a fever chart marking wind speed, and a bulletin crawl informing viewers that the governor of Alabama had just declared a state of emergency. That moment illustrates the dilemma facing the GOP as Tropical Storm Isaac lumbers toward the Gulf Coast, forecast to become a hurricane and threatening devastation - replete with reminders of Hurricane Katrina - at the very time the party needs its convention, which gets fully under way here Tuesday, to sell Mitt Romney to the nation.
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NEWS
August 29, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
TAMPA - When Republican National Chairman Reince Priebus banged the gavel to open his party's nominating convention Monday afternoon, it was hard to miss the images CNN was displaying across the bottom of the screen: a scarlet storm symbol spinning in the Gulf of Mexico, a fever chart marking wind speed, and a bulletin crawl informing viewers that the governor of Alabama had just declared a state of emergency. That moment illustrates the dilemma facing the GOP as Tropical Storm Isaac lumbers toward the Gulf Coast, forecast to become a hurricane and threatening devastation - replete with reminders of Hurricane Katrina - at the very time the party needs its convention, which gets fully under way here Tuesday, to sell Mitt Romney to the nation.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER POLITICS WRITER
TAMPA - When Republican National Chairman Reince Priebus banged the oversize gavel to open his party's nominating convention Monday afternoon, it was hard to miss the images CNN was displaying across the bottom of the screen: a scarlet storm symbol spinning in the Gulf of Mexico, a fever chart marking wind speed, and a bulletin crawl informing viewers that the governor of Alabama had just declared a state of emergency. That moment illustrates the dilemma facing the GOP as Tropical Storm Isaac hurtles toward the Gulf Coast, forecast to become a hurricane and threatening devastation - replete with reminders of Hurricane Katrina - at the very time the party needs its convention, which gets fully under way here Tuesday, to sell Mitt Romney to the nation.
NEWS
August 30, 2006 | By Natalie Pompilio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's Hurricane Katrina survivors wiped their eyes yesterday during a soulful rendition of "Walk With Me, Lord" as - thousands of miles away from home - they marked the one-year anniversary of the storm. And then they danced. A five-piece band began "When the Saints Go Marching In," and the crowd followed their hearts. They put up their umbrellas, waved their handkerchiefs, and two-stepped through the hallways and stairwells of City Hall and out onto the street. Some people stared.
NEWS
February 24, 2006 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The White House acknowledged yesterday that the response to Hurricane Katrina was botched because federal officials were confused, poorly prepared, and communicated badly. But instead of an overhaul of the Homeland Security bureaucracy, officials proposed 125 smaller fixes. The 11 most urgent recommendations, which the White House said were needed before the hurricane season starts June 1, had been routine practices by the Federal Emergency Management Agency before it was folded into the Department of Homeland Security, two former FEMA directors said yesterday.
NEWS
February 1, 2006 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Despite ample warning of an impending catastrophe, the federal government bungled its response to Hurricane Katrina because of a void of leadership and confusion about who was in charge, an independent investigation ordered by Congress has found. The Government Accountability Office, the investigatory arm of Congress, in a preliminary report to be released today faulted Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff and his designee, former Federal Emergency Management Agency chief Michael Brown, for not filling a crucial "leadership role during Hurricane Katrina.
NEWS
September 28, 2005 | By Shannon McCaffrey INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Michael Brown, the ousted chief of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, blamed Louisiana officials yesterday for much of the botched government response to Hurricane Katrina. In response, lawmakers alternately lambasted and mocked the former FEMA director. Testifying before a committee set up by House Republican leaders to investigate the response to Katrina, Brown angrily denounced suggestions that he could have done more and also took aim at the Bush administration. He said FEMA had been gutted by several years of budget cuts by the Department of Homeland Security.
NEWS
September 23, 2005 | By Shannon McCaffrey and Alison Young INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As a powerful new storm bore down on the Gulf Coast, Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff yesterday called Rita an "incident of national significance," paving the way for a massive federal response if state and local officials are overwhelmed. He also named a top Coast Guard officer to coordinate the federal action in Texas. With Katrina, Chertoff waited to take those critical steps until about 36 hours after the hurricane struck and water began pouring into New Orleans.
NEWS
September 22, 2005
Only an independent inquiry is likely to produce a credible accounting of the mistakes made after Hurricane Katrina blitzed New Orleans and other parts of the Gulf Coast. The federal investigation of the response to this natural disaster needs to come from a bipartisan commission without allegiance to either the White House or Capitol Hill. Democratic and Republican leaders are at odds over the composition of a joint legislative panel to study how FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, failed so badly.
NEWS
September 20, 2005 | By DAVID L. CRAWFORD
THE DEBATE over the federal, state and local responses to the Katrina disaster rages on, but nearly everyone seems to agree that the federal government should play a major role in the relief and rebuilding efforts. This is noteworthy because such agreements have been very hard to come by in the last 25 years or so. Fiscal conservatives have been very successful in their efforts to focus America's attention on only two goals for the federal government: providing national security and lowering taxes.
NEWS
September 17, 2005 | By Drew Brown, Seth Borenstein and Alison Young INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Two days after Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast, President Bush went on national television to announce a massive federal rescue-and-relief effort. But orders to move did not reach key active military units for an additional three days, and Bush administration officials could not explain the delay. Once they received the orders, it took just eight hours for 3,600 troops from the 82d Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, N.C., to be on the ground in Louisiana and Mississippi with vital search-and-rescue helicopters.
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