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January 24, 2003 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Pete Rose owes $151,690 in federal taxes from 1998, prompting the IRS to get a lien on his condominium in Los Angeles, the Cincinnati Enquirer reported in today's editions. California also filed a lien because Rose owed $2,772 in state taxes from 1997, but the money was later paid, according to the paper. Both liens were filed with the recorder's office in Los Angeles County, where Rose owns a $1 million condominium. Rose's accountant David Stern said the former Reds and Phillies star was not attempting to avoid taxes, but simply could not pay the entire amount owed when he filed his 1998 tax return.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
As boss of a big, publicly traded industrial business, Peter McCausland , executive board chairman and former CEO of Radnor-based Airgas Inc. , has fought off buyout funds and other "private equity" investors trying to make money at his company's expense. He says it is awfully unfair that federal law lets those high-living fund managers pocket their multimillion-dollar fees, subject only to a 15 percent capital-gains tax, instead of the higher income and payroll taxes that Airgas's 14,000-plus employees - managers to truck drivers - have to pay. Early this year, McCausland, a Republican, sent letters decrying unfair, uneven federal taxes to his U.S. senators - Democrat Robert P. Casey and Republican Pat Toomey - among others in Congress.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Chris Brennan and Daily News Staff Writer
THE FINANCIAL impact, Renee Amoore explained, was painful.   Speaking Monday in LOVE Park for Mitt Romney's presidential campaign, Amoore said she was forced to lay off 200 of her 500 employees. The blame, Amoore said, fell on President Obama's handling of the economy — specifically, increases in federal taxes on payroll, health care and business. Something there sounded off-kilter. We'll come back to that. Amoore, deputy chairwoman of the Pennsylvania Republican Party for 16 years, was playing a leading role in Romney's efforts to shift the focus from his business record to Obama's time in the White House.
NEWS
June 25, 2002 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A partner in a Philadelphia specialty finance firm was fined $250,000 - more than 12 times what federal guidelines recommend - and sentenced to six months' house arrest yesterday by a judge who said the guidelines did not accurately reflect the scope of the tax-shelter fraud involved. U.S. District Judge Berle M. Schiller, in rejecting the recommended $20,000 fine, told James Delaney the larger fine was the only way he could deter wealthy businesspeople from trying to defraud the Internal Revenue Service.
NEWS
October 16, 2010
Federal tax returns show Gov. Christie and his wife, a finance executive, earned $544,000 in gross income for 2009, a year he spent running for governor, and paid $147,000 in federal taxes. Christie's wife is a vice president of Cantor Fitzgerald, a financial services firm. Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno and her husband paid $72,000 in federal taxes on $317,000 in gross income. Guadagno was Monmouth County sheriff. Her husband is a Superior Court judge. The Christies had requested a tax filing extension.
NEWS
August 19, 1994 | By Nancy Phillips, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg, one of the richest members of the Senate, disclosed yesterday that he earned more than $18.2 million during the last six years and paid federal taxes of $5.3 million. On average, Lautenberg paid federal taxes equal to 29 percent of his taxable income. He also gave generously to charity - in some years donating more money to charitable causes than he paid in federal taxes. In 1993, for example, Lautenberg listed taxable income of $2.2 million, paid $756,013 in federal taxes and gave $809,488 to charity.
NEWS
September 21, 2011 | By Stephen Ohlemacher, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama says he wants to make sure millionaires are taxed at higher rates than their secretaries. The data say they already are. "Warren Buffett's secretary shouldn't pay a higher tax rate than Warren Buffett. There is no justification for it," Obama said as he announced his deficit-reduction plan this week. "It is wrong that in the United States of America, a teacher or a nurse or a construction worker who earns $50,000 should pay higher tax rates than somebody pulling in $50 million.
NEWS
June 13, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Lottery officials said yesterday that they were still waiting for someone to claim the $20.3 million jackpot from Wednesday's Super 7 lottery drawing. A computer check showed that only one winning ticket had been sold. The ticket, containing seven of the 11 winning numbers, can be exchanged for the jackpot - the state's second-largest payoff on a single ticket. Lottery spokeswoman Terry Champlin said the winning person or group has one year from the drawing date to have the ticket validated and claim the prize.
NEWS
March 14, 2000 | by Regina Medina, Daily News Staff Writer
Early retirement. A debt-free life. How about a private jet with 24-hour standby just for fun? Sigh. Lottery dreams remain just that for most players. But not for the Shemonski family of Montgomery County. Their reality has just turned a lot dreamier as holders of the only winning ticket to the $86 million Super 6 jackpot from the Dec. 1 drawing. The four-member family - parents Robert and Margaret, and sons Robert Jr. and Ken - will each receive a gross amount of $21,548,055.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | By Robert Zausner, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The estranged wife of Donald R. Woomer Sr., co-winner of the $46 million lottery jackpot, said yesterday that she believes she is entitled to one- fourth of the fortune. Woomer does not quite see it that way. Woomer, 55, a self-employed plasterer from tiny Hollidaysburg in Blair County, split the world's largest-ever single lottery prize with Linda K. Despot, 37, with whom he has lived for the last five years. His wife of 36 years, Pauline Woomer, said she did not believe that she had a right to Despot's half of the Super 7 bonanza - just half of Woomer's winnings.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Michelle Singletary, Washington Post Writers Group
ALTHOUGH I CAN'T respond to every question I receive, I do try to address a financial issue if enough readers ask about a similar topic. Such is the case following my column on tax-advantage 529 plans, which allow people to set aside money to help pay for college. One reader wrote: "I have had an investment account that, for years, had substantial growth in asset value, which will be taxed when I sell. If I transfer the balance of this account to a 529, does that mean withdrawals of that money are free from federal taxes?"
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Democratic mayoral candidate Lynne M. Abraham made good on a pledge at Monday night's debate and released three more years of her personal tax records Tuesday. They showed just what she said they would: that her financial dealings in those years varied little from those reported in her 2013 return, which she had already made public at The Inquirer's request. In releasing her federal tax returns for 2010, 2011, and 2012, she went one better than four of her opponents, who, at the request of The Inquirer, released three years of returns, 2011 through 2013.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
With the onset of the 2015 tax-filing season, here are cautionary tales of a man and a woman whom you don't want preparing your taxes. The Department of Justice and the Internal Revenue Service highlight some of the brightest red flags among fraudulent tax preparers. These two local folks were doozies. In 2013, "Archie" - full name, Adekunle Adetayo Adeolu - was sentenced to prison and $135,519 in restitution after filing false tax returns. He operated Adeolu & Okojie, a tax-service business in Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 29, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A FEDERAL judge has dismissed part of a lawsuit filed this year by Chaka "Chip" Fattah Jr. against the IRS, FBI and U.S. Department of Justice but allowed another part of the suit to proceed. U.S. District Judge Timothy Savage's order, filed yesterday, followed a motion by the government's attorney in Washington to dismiss claims in the suit and to dismiss the FBI and DOJ as defendants. Savage agreed to dismiss the FBI and DOJ as defendants because the time period allowed under the law to sue them had passed.
NEWS
June 28, 2014
The Pennsylvania House's proposed $29.1 billion budget is so out of step with the state's actual needs that the document's only possible use is to serve as scratch paper for notes during the Senate debate. The House budget largely addresses the state's estimated $1.5 billion funding gap by again shortchanging schools. It provides an additional $70 million, a 1.3 percent increase, for basic education. But that doesn't come close to making up for past cuts that have forced schools to lay off teachers.
NEWS
September 21, 2013 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Abruptly halting his trial on fraud and tax-evasion charges, suspended Philadelphia Traffic Court Judge Robert Mulgrew pleaded guilty Thursday in a deal in which federal prosecutors dropped all charges against his wife. Mulgrew struck the deal after only one day of testimony in his trial for skimming tens of thousands of dollars from state grants given to improve a park in South Philadelphia's Pennsport neighborhood. While his grown children watched tearfully, Mulgrew, 56, stood in court to plead guilty to one count of mail fraud and one count of filing a false personal tax return.
NEWS
April 14, 2013 | By Philip Rucker, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - President Obama and his wife, Michelle, reported paying $112,214 in taxes last year on $608,611 in adjusted gross income for an effective federal income tax rate of 18.4 percent, the White House announced Friday. That marks a decline from the Obamas' adjusted gross income of $789,674 in 2011, when they paid slightly more than 20 percent of it in federal taxes. The president earns a salary of $400,000, while the first lady receives no pay. The president continues to receive royalties from his published books; declining sales appear to have contributed to his drop in income between 2011 and 2012.
NEWS
April 14, 2013 | By Philip Rucker, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - President Obama and his wife, Michelle, reported paying $112,214 in taxes last year on $608,611 in adjusted gross income for an effective federal income tax rate of 18.4 percent, the White House announced Friday. That marks a decline from the Obamas' adjusted gross income of $789,674 in 2011, when they paid slightly more than 20 percent of it in federal taxes. The president earns a salary of $400,000, while the first lady receives no pay. The president continues to receive royalties from his published books; declining sales appear to have contributed to his drop in income between 2011 and 2012.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
One in six Pennsylvanians lacks health insurance. These people are your neighbors and relatives. They serve food and sell clothing. They work in malls and casinos. They provide care for the young and elderly. People without health insurance routinely delay treatment. They get sicker, work less, suffer more, and die sooner. Their ranks doubled in this region in the last dozen years. The Affordable Care Act would make 631,000 more Pennsylvanians eligible for Medicaid coverage next year, many of them making $10 an hour and just getting by. During the first three years, the federal government picks up 100 percent of the tab, with support gradually falling to 90 percent afterward.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | Jonathan Tamari, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
WASHINGTON - Inside HC-5, a conference room at the end of a long, dimly lit corridor in the basement of the Capitol, a New Year's Day insurrection simmered among House Republicans. A deal to avert the fiscal cliff had come down from the Senate, but many in the House Republican caucus' energized and often indignant right wing didn't like what they saw. Taxes would rise. Where were the spending cuts? They wanted to send the bill back with amendments the Senate would never accept.
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