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August 23, 2007 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Catholic League is in the PIAA. Let the recruiting scrutiny commence. As of July 1, the Catholic League schools became transitional members of the PIAA and thus are required to follow the organization's rules. And while the immediate concerns for the football programs have to do with tweaks to practices, scrimmages and some on-field rules, the big- picture concern has everything to do with recruiting. The PIAA bars the practice unless a coach recruits from his school's feeder schools.
SPORTS
February 20, 2006 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Suburban Staff
Siobhan Latta thought her expectations were high. Apparently, they weren't high enough. Latta, a Father Judge cheerleading coach, wanted her squad to make the super varsity finals at the National High School Cheerleading Championships. But the Crusaders did much more than reach the finals of the large-school portion. Father Judge placed fourth in the competition, held Feb. 10 to Feb. 12 at Walt Disney World near Orlando, Fla. Cardinal O'Hara, which also reached the finals, finished 15th.
NEWS
January 22, 1987 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Washington High School lost this month in its fourth attempt to gain magnet status for its nationally recognized high-technology program. The reason is a precarious racial balance in Northeast Philadelphia schools, education officials said. "We have a shrinking white school-age population in Philadelphia," said Ernestine Carter, director of the public school system's desegregation office. "We are very careful where we put these magnet programs. "It's our feeling that if we were to put another magnet program in there (the Northeast)
NEWS
November 10, 2010 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
Superintendent Arlene Ackerman and Mayor Nutter have convened a panel to deal with recent violence that has sparked concerns about school safety. The ultimate goal, Ackerman said, is to create an environment in and out of school in which students can learn without fearing for their safety. "You can't learn if you don't come to school," she said. "One day very soon all of our young people will feel like they can come to school. "Some of our young people are scared to come to school.
NEWS
March 15, 1996 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a week that had been going from bad to worse for Philadelphia School Superintendent David Hornbeck, the William Penn Foundation yesterday handed him something to celebrate - $13.8 million for education reform in the city system. The grant - the largest in the local philanthropy's 50-year history - will be disbursed over the next three years to fund fully two of Hornbeck's controversial kindergarten-through-12th-grade clusters, the linchpin of his Children Achieving agenda. Those clusters are composed of West Philadelphia High School and its 11 feeder schools and Martin Luther King High and its 14 feeder schools.
NEWS
October 24, 2002 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
An Ocean County school district, rattled by a shooting a year ago at Fort Dix, announced this week that it will install an eye-catching new security measure. Plumsted Township, just a few miles from the base, will begin scanning the irises of staff and parents entering school buildings in January. A six-month trial will include only willing adults, not students. "You know how some buildings have a swipe-card system? This will take its place," said Phil Meara, the district's assistant superintendent.
NEWS
March 24, 1986 | By Kathy Boccella, Special to The Inquirer
The Marple Newtown school board has formed a committee to come up with a redistricting plan to correct the imbalance of students in the district's four elementary schools. Last year, the school board had proposed closing a school but succumbed to parental pressure to keep all four schools open. Superintendent Glenn M. Sanner said Thursday night that the redistricting effort meant that the school board would not close an elementary school next year. "The school board did a community survey and that survey said we ought not to close an elementary school," said Sanner.
NEWS
May 1, 1998 | By Juan C. Rodriguez, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Residents are so fed up with a 48.9 percent school tax increase that they are mailing postcards to their district's state legislators in protest. Members of the Pemberton Borough Home and School Association are going door to door, asking residents to sign postcards addressed to State Sen. Robert Singer and Assemblymen Melvin Cottrell and Joe Malone. The postcards - 250 of which have already been mailed - ask the officials for relief from an increase that will cost the owner of a typical home $650 more a year.
NEWS
February 12, 1995
As Philadelphians try to assess David W. Hornbeck's bold design for reforming their public schools, a look at Baltimore, the biggest city in the state where he built a large part of his national reputation, is both instructive and sobering. The city near the Chesapeake has seen all kinds of school-reform experiments since 1987, when education-minded Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke was elected. Several lessons can be drawn from Baltimore's experiences. First: It helps a lot to have high-profile support for public school reform from the mayor, but it's no insurance against conflicts between school officials and City Hall.
NEWS
December 17, 2001 | By Maureen Fitzgerald INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Born in Kensington, George Munyan grew up poor. He knew the shame of walking to school in the winter without a coat. When he was in high school, his mom was shampooing heads, his dad had walked out, and their furniture was repossessed. While attending Cardinal Dougherty High School in Philadelphia, he scored 850 out of a possible 1,600 on the SAT. A career test told him that he should be a farmer. Munyan, principal of Cherry Hill High School West, is clearly a man who beat the odds.
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SPORTS
October 23, 2011 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
Friday night at Camden Catholic was about football. It was a game. It was a high school sporting event. It was a showcase for top athletes and dedicated coaches, a showdown of unbeaten teams with the highest of postseason aspirations. It was something else, too. It was a big crowd. It was an excited student body. It was an engaged alumni. It was lifeblood for a private school that needs every drop. Camden Catholic is no different from Paul VI or Gloucester Catholic or St. Joseph of Hammonton or Holy Cross or Holy Spirit.
NEWS
October 22, 2011
Friday night at Camden Catholic was about football. It was a game. It was a high school sporting event. It was a showcase for top athletes and dedicated coaches, a showdown of unbeaten teams with the highest of postseason aspirations. It was something else, too. It was a big crowd. It was an excited student body. It was an engaged alumni. It was lifeblood for a private school that needs every drop. Camden Catholic is no different from Paul VI or Gloucester Catholic or St. Joseph of Hammonton or Holy Cross or Holy Spirit.
NEWS
November 10, 2010 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
Superintendent Arlene Ackerman and Mayor Nutter have convened a panel to deal with recent violence that has sparked concerns about school safety. The ultimate goal, Ackerman said, is to create an environment in and out of school in which students can learn without fearing for their safety. "You can't learn if you don't come to school," she said. "One day very soon all of our young people will feel like they can come to school. "Some of our young people are scared to come to school.
NEWS
February 27, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University are in serious talks with the Philadelphia School District to jointly operate two small high schools in University City - the first venture of its kind for the district at the high school level. The two schools - one focusing on international studies, the other on engineering and technology - would serve the University City High School area and eventually could be housed in that building once it is renovated. Both school district and university officials say terms are being negotiated and subject to approval by the School Reform Commission, which could consider the project as soon as April.
NEWS
February 27, 2008 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University are in serious talks with the Philadelphia School District to jointly operate two small high schools in University City - the first venture of its kind for the district at the high school level. The two schools - one focusing on international studies, the other on engineering and technology - would serve the University City High School area and eventually could be housed in that building once it is renovated. Both school district and university officials say terms are being negotiated and subject to approval by the School Reform Commission, which could consider the project as soon as April.
SPORTS
August 23, 2007 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Catholic League is in the PIAA. Let the recruiting scrutiny commence. As of July 1, the Catholic League schools became transitional members of the PIAA and thus are required to follow the organization's rules. And while the immediate concerns for the football programs have to do with tweaks to practices, scrimmages and some on-field rules, the big- picture concern has everything to do with recruiting. The PIAA bars the practice unless a coach recruits from his school's feeder schools.
SPORTS
March 29, 2006 | By Rob Parent INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brad Cashman isn't always prone to publicly preaching the gospel of the PIAA, but the organization's executive director doesn't leave any doubt as to how he feels about the potential growth of the organization. Cashman spent a portion of last weekend's PIAA's state basketball championships talking up the possibility of the Philadelphia Catholic League joining the PIAA, something that had been discussed before and was officially renewed in meetings Monday at the archdiocese offices.
SPORTS
February 20, 2006 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Suburban Staff
Siobhan Latta thought her expectations were high. Apparently, they weren't high enough. Latta, a Father Judge cheerleading coach, wanted her squad to make the super varsity finals at the National High School Cheerleading Championships. But the Crusaders did much more than reach the finals of the large-school portion. Father Judge placed fourth in the competition, held Feb. 10 to Feb. 12 at Walt Disney World near Orlando, Fla. Cardinal O'Hara, which also reached the finals, finished 15th.
NEWS
October 31, 2005 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a push to prepare students for the ever-changing global marketplace, the Philadelphia School District is expanding classes in Mandarin Chinese - the most prevalent language in the world, yet largely neglected by the nation's schools until the last few years. More than 1,700 students are taking Chinese this year at six district high schools and three elementary schools - up from 900 two years ago. Now Paul Vallas, the school district's chief executive officer, wants to double that number.
NEWS
October 24, 2002 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
An Ocean County school district, rattled by a shooting a year ago at Fort Dix, announced this week that it will install an eye-catching new security measure. Plumsted Township, just a few miles from the base, will begin scanning the irises of staff and parents entering school buildings in January. A six-month trial will include only willing adults, not students. "You know how some buildings have a swipe-card system? This will take its place," said Phil Meara, the district's assistant superintendent.
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