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Feelies

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1986 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
The Feelies, making an extremely rare local appearance at Revival Sunday night, are making an even rarer appearance in record stores these days: The Haledon, N.J., band's new release, The Good Earth (Coyote Records), is the first Feelies album in more than six years. When first heard from, the Feelies had released Crazy Rhythms in 1980, an album of intricate guitar stylings and dreamy melodies. The Good Earth features a number of new band members but retains the band's creative center, guitarist-singer-writers Bill Million and Glen Mercer.
NEWS
December 5, 1988 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
The setting was more like that of a poetry reading than a concert. A seated crowd of about 300 people at the Theater of the Living Arts greeted the Feelies last night with a polite smattering of applause as the group of five walked onto the barren stage, with a black backdrop. After each song, the band was saluted with that same pattering of hands. Perhaps it was the lack of a dance floor at the 400-seat auditorium. It could have even been the way the band members stopped after almost every song to crouch over their electronic tuners and tune up their guitars But for some reason, the momentum that the Haledon, N.J., band builds during its three-minute fits of passion doesn't carry from song to song.
NEWS
November 25, 1988 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
When he named his post-new wave band the Feelies 10 years ago, Bill Million says he "might have been thinking of that children's game where you put your hands inside a covered box and guess what's inside. " Author Aldous Huxley also provided some inspiration. "In the novel 'Brave New World,' he refers to the cinema of the future as 'the feelies.' It's a movie theater where you go and feel the emotions of the characters on screen. " Rock fans who've been lucky to witness the rare Feelies performance or hear one of their albums usually come away elevated by the heady encounter, frothing at the lips.
NEWS
March 16, 2009 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
The Feelies are one of those beloved band's bands whose influence far exceeds their royalty statements, and, as a consequence, the period on the last sentence in their bio keeps turning into a comma. Born of the suburban garages of North Haledon, N.J., they released Crazy Rhythms in 1980 to massive acclaim and minimal sales, then promptly split off into myriad minor side projects, only to resurface again in 1986 with the altogether wonderful The Good Earth. It was coproduced by Peter Buck, guitarist for R.E.M.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1988 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Being lost in the underground-band abyss isn't always such a bad fate. In 1978, the Village Voice called the Feelies the "best underground band in New York. " Their debut record (Crazy Rhythm, on Stiff in 1980) had a predictable life: Loved by critics and devotees, it was marginally successful before being gobbled up in a sea of business disputes. "We wrote these songs and had one concept of playing music," guitarist Bill Million told the Providence (R.I.) New Paper this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2010 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
When Crazy Rhythms, the Feelies' first album, came out in 1980, it was deeply loved by a small set of devotees, but it fit awkwardly into the pop music landscape of the time. The intricate but minimalist percussion, the interlocking, tightly wound guitars, the understated, undemonstrative vocals - characteristics derived from the Velvet Underground - were anomalies amid the aggressive post-punk and the arty, quirky New Wave that dominated the New York scene that they frequented. But the Feelies albums have held up better than many of their more-popular contemporaries.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1991 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Bill Million and his buddies in The Feelies don't live in the past - they just respect it. Philadelphia music archivist Dave Brown, on the other hand, takes an almost perverse pleasure in digging out musical dregs of an earlier era - area-based groups such as the Soul Generation and the Nomads, Facts of Life and the Young Generation, who recorded a couple of original songs with their bar-gig profits but didn't even qualify as one-hit wonders....
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013
Sallie Ford & The Sound Outside In their showcase set at Antone's at the South by Southwest Music Festival in Austin, Texas, last week, Sallie Ford & The Sound Outside rumbled like Link Wray while their fishnet-stocking-wearing bespectacled leader declared herself an "Untamed Beast," in the title song to their new album. The Portland, Ore., quartet sport a vintage 1950s look that threatens to pigeonhole them as mere genre revivalist. The same fate threatens other early-rock fetishizing acts like JD McPherson, as well as the untold numbers of suit-and-tie-wearing retro-soul acts roaming stages across the land.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1988 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
One indication of the confidence of a rock-and-roll band is the strength of its instrumental play. Writing the great song is one thing, elaborating on it without the luxury of words quite another. The Feelies, considered one of the East Coast's premier bands, make the instrumental writing count and they do it with consistency on Only Life (A&M ). The guitar solos aren't shoehorned into such songs as "Deep Fascination" and "Higher Ground" - they're part of the structures, riding triumphantly over carefully constructed rhythm-guitar accompaniment.
NEWS
July 18, 2002 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
At the North Star on Tuesday night, the National Trust, Archer Prewitt and Josh Rouse took different routes toward the middle of the road. If they were jeans, they would be, in succession, stone-washed, acid-washed and brushed denim - each snug-fitting and easy on the skin. With rickety rhythm-and-blues arrangements and off-kilter harmonies, the rough-and-tumble National Trust, like Al Green on the corner of Exile on Main Street, was Stones-washed. Neil Rosario's raspy falsetto cascaded nicely onto a messy mix of fuzzy Fender Rhodes and rolling conga lines for a diabolical mid-tempo soul sound.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2016 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
The world can seem like a pretty bleak place some days, but we do live in a time when the Feelies tour regularly. After guitarist and co-founder Bill Million decamped for Florida in 1991, it seemed as if the book had been shut for good on the influential - if never huge-selling - pride of Passaic County, N.J. Rumors were that even Million's erstwhile bandmates didn't know how to get in touch with him. But at the urging of Sonic Youth - just...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2016
Songhoy Blues Most of the bands who have brought North African desert blues to the U.S. in recent years - Tinariwen, Terakaft, and Tamikrest, to name three - are of the Tuareg ethnic minority. The musicians in Songhoy Blues are Songhoy people who in 2012 fled persecution from jihadists in Timbuktu to relocate to the music-friendly capital of Bamako in southern Mali. The group, led by Garba Touré, Aliou Touré, and Oumar Touré, who are not related, came to the attention of Western ears after Blur leader Damon Albarn's Africa Express went on a collaboration tour of Mali in 2013.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | Inquirer Staff
Chris Brown Royalty (RCA **) Chris Brown might not be your cup of energy drink, but his last two solo albums - 2012's Fortune and 2014's X - were glorious testaments to outré electro R&B and wickedly eccentric hip-hop. He managed to keep these escapades commercial and catchy with his dynamic vocal prowess and bad-boy charm. But 2015 has been lousy, between the awful Fan of a Fan: The Album with Tyga (blame Tyga: He's blandly terrible) and now Royalty . Named for his year-old daughter (she's on the cover, clinging to Dad's chest)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013
Sallie Ford & The Sound Outside In their showcase set at Antone's at the South by Southwest Music Festival in Austin, Texas, last week, Sallie Ford & The Sound Outside rumbled like Link Wray while their fishnet-stocking-wearing bespectacled leader declared herself an "Untamed Beast," in the title song to their new album. The Portland, Ore., quartet sport a vintage 1950s look that threatens to pigeonhole them as mere genre revivalist. The same fate threatens other early-rock fetishizing acts like JD McPherson, as well as the untold numbers of suit-and-tie-wearing retro-soul acts roaming stages across the land.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: My wife and I have been together for 16 years, married for 14. We had children late and have two lovely kids. We both never wanted children, and then suddenly she wants a child and I acquiesce, consequently I fall in love with said child. Eventually one child is not enough and we must have another - and do. Now I feel trapped and resentful. I do love our second child, but suddenly really resent my wife. Our love life sucks and is totally up to her. I do try to add romance to our lives with notes, flowers, dinners out; the extra effort seems to matter none.
NEWS
May 5, 2012 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
If Zac Braff's Garden State was The Graduate for the iPod generation, the Shins' "New Slang" was its "Sound of Silence. " "You have to hear this one song, it will change your life," Natalie Portman beseeched us all in Braff's film. That scene sure changed the Shins' life, for better and for worse — depending on where you stand on the two albums that followed, 2007's winsome Wincing the Night Away and the new Port of Morrow. I like 'em fine, but they sound like the work of a different band from the one that made Oh, Inverted World and Chutes Too Narrow in the early '00s.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Making your way through the creepy, funky, and inspiring FiberPhiladelphia exhibition "Outside/Inside the Box," in the Crane Arts Building's Icebox Project Space, is unexpectedly affecting. There is a surprising intimacy to these materials that makes the art very direct and personal, and it tends to follow you around throughout your day. And why not? When Brenna K. Murphy is using hair in her art, or Riccardo Berlingeri is transforming burned newspapers (and one hopeful green shoot)
NEWS
June 12, 2011
Pop Cults (In The Name Of . ) The Brooklyn duo of Madeline Follin and Brian O'Blivion - good name, that - first got attention with a three-song EP early in 2010. So it's taken an eternity in Internet time for the band's self-titled debut, which is the first release on Lily Allen's In The Name Of label, a partnership with Sony Music. So what's the buzz about? For starters, it was the single "Go Outside," which cleverly upped the intriguing factor of a super-catchy, Supremes-flavored, girl-group throwback song by dressing it up with the sampled voice of People's Temple doomsday cult leader Jim Jones.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2010 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
When Crazy Rhythms, the Feelies' first album, came out in 1980, it was deeply loved by a small set of devotees, but it fit awkwardly into the pop music landscape of the time. The intricate but minimalist percussion, the interlocking, tightly wound guitars, the understated, undemonstrative vocals - characteristics derived from the Velvet Underground - were anomalies amid the aggressive post-punk and the arty, quirky New Wave that dominated the New York scene that they frequented. But the Feelies albums have held up better than many of their more-popular contemporaries.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Everything about the little cabaret musical called Have a Nice Life - which has done very well for the evolving Nice People Theatre Company, and is in revival through the weekend - seems 40 years old. It's about six people in a group therapy session and a seventh character, their cloying, naive leader. The all-about-me group therapy sessions that Have a Nice Life depicts were popular in the '60s and '70s, replete with role-playing and other "exercises," as the show's leader calls them, to destroy your inhibited self so you could share all your worst parts.
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