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NEWS
October 11, 1993 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sex bias pervades the nation's justice system, affecting women as lawyers, litigants and employees, a panel of top jurists told a gathering of 250 female judges meeting in Philadelphia over the weekend. Women are treated unequally both as lawyers and in judges' decisions, and stereotyped myths and biases skew everything from personal-injury damage awards to prison sentences and decisions on alimony and child support, the jurists said. "This is a problem perceived by virtually all women in the legal profession and very few of the men," said U.S. District Judge John C. Coughenour of Seattle.
NEWS
January 8, 1996 | By Aaron Epstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Numerically, women have made enormous strides in the influential, male-dominated profession of law. Twenty-five years ago, only one of every 33 lawyers was a woman. Today nearly one of every four lawyers and nearly one in two law students are women. Women hold powerful legal positions as never before. Two are Supreme Court justices. The U.S. attorney general, several of her top assistants, and hundreds of corporate general counsels are women. Moreover, these developments have helped bring about changes in the way the law treats domestic violence, child support, gender bias and sexual harassment.
NEWS
November 6, 1991 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Did he or didn't he? Weeks after Clarence Thomas was sworn in as a Supreme Court justice, the question of whether he sexually harassed a colleague is still hot (witness the current issue of People magazine). Widener University sociologist Janet Rosenberg may have the answer. At least, she may have answers to one of the most bedeviling aspects of the controversy: If law professor Anita Hill was telling the truth, why didn't she blow the whistle when the harassment happened?
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a set of guidelines believed to be the most comprehensive of their kind in the nation, the Philadelphia Bar Association yesterday called on the city's law firms to grant substantial maternity benefits to women lawyers and additional benefits to both male and female lawyers who are parents. Bar officials said the guidelines, which were unanimously approved by the Board of Governors of the 11,500-member professional association, came in response to dramatically increasing numbers of female lawyers in Philadelphia and concerns that they were experiencing career problems because of parenting demands.
NEWS
May 17, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
SOMETHING'S FISHY ON INTERSTATE 79 A load of catfish heading for a new home in an Ohio lake spilled onto an interstate in Mink Shoals, W.Va., yesterday when the truck crashed. Traffic was disrupted for three hours. No one was injured. The truck's driver, Ricky Scarberry of Chesapeake, Ohio, had picked up 4,000 pounds of fish in Maryland. They were to be used to stock a lake in Chesapeake, said Kanawha County Sheriff's Deputy Jim Meddings. Scarberry struck a tractor-trailer parked on the side of Interstate 79, and a fiberglass fish tank spilled its contents.
LIVING
May 9, 1999 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the first women entered the male-dominated law profession in Philadelphia some 50 years ago, they followed a dress code: No suits. The female lawyers, according to reports, didn't want to look too aggressive in pursuit of justice. But in the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office, aggressive is good. While corporate America may have embraced casual Fridays, a prudish jurisprudence still rules in Lynne M. Abraham's office. Soon after she took office in 1991, she laid down the law: No pantsuits.
NEWS
August 4, 1993 | By CYNTHIA FUCHS EPSTEIN
It was a very rare female law graduate who found employment as an attorney 30 years ago when Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sandra Day O'Connor graduated from law school. They did not. Both placed at the top of their classes at highly regarded law schools - Ginsburg at Columbia and O'Connor at Stanford - but neither was offered work as a practicing attorney. A great deal has changed since then. The historic moment when the two women appear among the robed justices of the U.S. Supreme Court will be a tribute to their intelligence, perseverance and hard work - and also to the battles waged and won by a handful of female lawyers, law students and sympathetic male colleagues.
NEWS
November 23, 1992 | By Michael Sokolove, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Patricia Burke Henss, 64, who practiced law while raising five children - and sometimes joked that she should write an autobiography called "Diapers in My Briefcase" - died Saturday at home in Philadelphia. After graduating from Temple Law School in 1953, she set up as a single practicioner in Havertown, specializing in family law. There were only a handful of other female lawyers in the county, and few if any colleagues who were balancing careers and families. "Back in those days, there were not many others for her to learn from," said her husband, Norman C. Henss, a lawyer in Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 14, 1997 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
They had a "most eligible lawyer" contest in Center City last night. Not that lawyers make the best dates. At least not according to many of the lawyers who were at the contest - including the guy who won the male lawyer category. "I have never dated a lawyer," admitted Gerald McCabe, 32. "I'm scared of them. I know myself. Lawyers are too argumentative. " Not a single lawyer last night argued that point. "Lawyers are not spontaneous, they're analytical," observed Kevin Dougherty, who believes he wisely chose to marry a non-lawyer.
NEWS
May 4, 2006 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mystery author Lisa Scottoline said she grew up in a household where there was plenty of love and lots of hugs, but only one book - TV Guide. "We loved television, but my parents did not read," said the best-selling author, who now lives in Chester County. So her path to success started when a school librarian in her hometown of Bala Cynwyd introduced her to the world of books. Scottoline's ardor for libraries has never faded, and yesterday the Chester County Library System returned the compliment: It named her 13 novels this year's books for the Chester County Reads program.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lillian Baker, 92, of Burlington City, who in 1945 became the first woman admitted to the bar in Burlington County, died Saturday, July 13, of respiratory failure at Samaritan Hospice in Mount Holly. The former Lillian Dubrow graduated from Burlington City High School in 1937, and the College of South Jersey two years later. In 1943, long before women routinely studied law, she earned a law degree from South Jersey Law School - now Rutgers Law School. She practiced briefly with a local attorney and then with her sister, Florence Steel, also an attorney.
NEWS
January 19, 2013 | By Seymour I. "Spence" Toll
While thinning out a bloated file cabinet in my study recently, I came across a totally obscure and unintentionally prophetic piece I had written in 1973. It was about how Philadelphia lawyers dressed for work. At the time, I was the editor of a new weekly tabloid that the Philadelphia Bar Association published and distributed to all members. I occasionally wrote lighthearted editorials for the paper, called the Retainer. An example was that piece I found, headlined "Cut the Noose!"
NEWS
September 29, 2012
Betty A. Thompson, 88, who became one of the most prominent family-law attorneys in Virginia and who was instrumental in modernizing the commonwealth's divorce statutes, died Monday at George Washington University Hospital in Washington. She had suffered a stroke, said Laura Dove, a lawyer at Ms. Thompson's Arlington County-based firm. After graduating from George Washington University's law school in 1948, Ms. Thompson became one of the first female lawyers in Arlington, Va. She made a short-lived bid for the General Assembly in 1957 as a pro-segregationist candidate but in later decades reversed herself as "very open-minded" on equal rights.
NEWS
May 4, 2006 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mystery author Lisa Scottoline said she grew up in a household where there was plenty of love and lots of hugs, but only one book - TV Guide. "We loved television, but my parents did not read," said the best-selling author, who now lives in Chester County. So her path to success started when a school librarian in her hometown of Bala Cynwyd introduced her to the world of books. Scottoline's ardor for libraries has never faded, and yesterday the Chester County Library System returned the compliment: It named her 13 novels this year's books for the Chester County Reads program.
NEWS
October 7, 2005
Good priests betrayed Re: "Targeting the church," letter, Sept. 30: I'm struck by the blinders worn by those who insist that District Attorney Lynne Abraham is expressing anti-Catholic bias by performing her duty and not prosecuting priests accused of sexual abuse of minors. The letter referenced above asks why The Inquirer or Abraham haven't shown any interest in investigating public school employees. Public school employees accused of sexual assault are removed from their place of employment until the judicial process has been completed.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2005 | By Tony Gnoffo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia lawyers are getting older, richer - and possibly less female, according to a bar association survey released yesterday. The uncertainty about gender in the Philadelphia Bar Association's survey of its members, conducted every five years, stems from the fact that 16 of the lawyers polled - nearly 5 percent of the total - did not say whether they were male or female. Still, the association's chancellor, Andrew A. Chirls, a WolfBlock partner, acknowledged yesterday that women remain underrepresented in the ranks of Philadelphia lawyers and that firms need to do more to retain them.
NEWS
November 26, 2003 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time in a dozen years, Philadelphia's female prosecutors yesterday could cast aside their skirts and dresses - and go to work wearing a pair of pants. District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham announced at a staff-wide meeting Monday night that her prohibition of pantsuits was a thing of the past. "I'm not stuck in any time warp. I'm a forward-thinking, open-minded person," said Abraham, 62, who instituted the skirts-and-dresses-only policy shortly after she took office in 1991.
NEWS
January 27, 2002 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Isabel Darlington, the first woman admitted to the practice of law in Chester County, was not a feminist crusader. She became a lawyer in response to a financial disaster that threatened her lifestyle. "Women are driven into business and the professions in most cases for the same reason that men are - necessity," said Darlington, as quoted by Gail Capehart in an article in Pennsylvania Heritage (winter of 1995). Darlington was so driven that she paid tuition and took courses at the University of Pennsylvania without having been formally admitted and with no guarantee of getting her degree.
LIVING
May 9, 1999 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the first women entered the male-dominated law profession in Philadelphia some 50 years ago, they followed a dress code: No suits. The female lawyers, according to reports, didn't want to look too aggressive in pursuit of justice. But in the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office, aggressive is good. While corporate America may have embraced casual Fridays, a prudish jurisprudence still rules in Lynne M. Abraham's office. Soon after she took office in 1991, she laid down the law: No pantsuits.
LIVING
November 8, 1998 | By Ewart Rouse, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They refer to their handoff as a changing of the guard. Every Wednesday, Elizabeth J. Hampton arrives for work to take over for the rest of the week from fellow part-timer Julie A. Williamson. Williamson works Mondays, Tuesdays and half-day Wednesdays. Hampton works Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. It's an arrangement that has enabled the two South Jersey women to achieve a balance between motherhood and career. Job-sharing isn't uncommon in the mainstream workforce, at insurance firms, banks, and mortgage companies.
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