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Fences

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NEWS
March 25, 2000
Philadelphia is being shipped - piece by piece - to wherever there's an insatiable demand for decorative items from old houses. That's how Daily News staff writer Scott Flander described the widespread theft of Philadelphia wrought-iron fencing, ornamental grates, brass doorknobs and front-door lights, even cobblestone streets and brick sidewalks. These are stolen, for the most part, by street people or others on the edge of society who pick up a few bucks from dealers and others specializing in antiques.
NEWS
September 7, 1986 | By Charlie Frush, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Edgewater Park Township Committee has introduced an ordinance that would amend the community's zoning regulations for fences and will consider passage of the ordinance at its monthly meeting Sept. 17. One section of the ordinance would prohibit so-called privacy fences, or solid fences of any sort, in front yards. Forbidden would be any fences that are not at least 50 percent "open," allowing a view of the yard from the other side of the fence. Township administrator D. Robert Heal said this provision also would bar the insertion of plastic slats in chain-link fences in front yards.
NEWS
June 21, 1989 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
In the last three months, Mantua Township has approved three ordinances that officials have said were needed to control the problems of population growth. They are a law controlling use of all-terrain vehicles, one to regulate shooting and a third designed to save the trees on lots under development. Now the township is dealing with fences. Specifically, Mantua committeemen at their meeting June 13 presented an amendment to the zoning code that would lift the 4-foot limit allowed for property fences.
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | By Katharine Seelye, Inquirer Staff Writer
Homeowners in Haverford will be allowed to put up 6-foot solid fences if their neighborhoods are contiguous with commercial districts. The township previously allowed 6-foot fences, but the top 2 feet had to be open. Residents not contiguous with commercial districts still will be prohibited from building solid fences. The new ordinance was passed 6-0 by the Board of Commissioners on Monday night without discussion. Several residents living near commercial areas who were upset over the lack of privacy had pressed for the measure.
NEWS
June 8, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
"Maybe I shouldn't say this," I began. Carole Shorenstein Hays interrupted me with a nervous laugh. "Please don't," she said. And I didn't. We'd been on the phone hardly 10 minutes last week, but she knew what I was going to say. I was about to tell her that Fences would surely win the Tony Award for best play. I hesitated because theater people tend to be superstitious, to the extent that you're not even supposed to wish them good luck. I could have asked what she would wear to the Tony Award ceremonies last night (a maternity dress designed by Pauline Trigere)
NEWS
September 11, 1986 | By Howard Manly, Inquirer Staff Writer
It appeared to be a simple request before the Cheltenham Township Zoning Board: Some residents wanted to build a 6-foot-high fence around their back yards. The residents, many of whom purchased houses in a recently completed development called Homes of Elkins Park near two busy streets, Washington Lane and Ashbourne Road, said they wanted to keep the public from "invading their privacy. " "People can look right down your throat," said Graham Murphy, who lives on the 7800 block of Caversham Road.
SPORTS
May 27, 2004 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Jose Guillen apologized to his Anaheim Angels teammates yesterday, two days after ripping them for not backing him up after he was hit by a pitch. Guillen went on a profanity-laced tirade after the Angels' 6-5, 10-inning loss to Toronto on Monday. The Angels were off Tuesday. Guillen apologized yesterday during a team meeting, and manager Mike Scioscia said the outfielder initiated the session. "I just want to apologize to my teammates and the whole organization for those comments," the leftfielder said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
As someone who grew up with only a sister, plays about brothers (like True West ) have never spoken to me. But plays about fathers and sons? Hoo boy. So take it with the smallest grain of salt when I say People's Light and Theatre Company's staging of August Wilson's Fences is one of the best productions I've seen in years. No small part of this success stems from Wilson's Tony and Pulitzer Prize-winning script, whose conflicts could have constituted three separate plays.
SPORTS
October 7, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
The fences at Daytona and Talladega will be raised from 14 to 22 feet following a safety analysis conducted after Carl Edwards' airborne flight into the Alabama track's safety barrier. A wreck on the last lap in April's race at Talladega sent Edwards sailing into the fence. It bowed, but held and his car shot back onto the track. Debris from the accident injured seven fans in the stands, the most serious a broken jaw suffered by a teenage girl. The frontstretch fence at Talladega will be raised before the Nov. 1 race, and the backstretch will be completed during the offseason.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
James Earl Jones in "Fences," a new drama by August Wilson. Directed by Lloyd Richards, set by James D. Sandefur, costumes by Candice Donnelly, lighting by Danianne Mizzy. Presented at the 46th Street Theatre, 226 W. 46th St., New York. The so-called "magic moments" come all too seldom in the commercial theater. It happened Thursday night at the Broadway opening of August Wilson's "Fences," a drama about a black laboring man of the 1950s with a macho problem. In one of the few quiet times in a play taken most of the evening at full cry, James Earl Jones modulates his rich voice to an unselfconsciously intimate hush in conversation with his stage wife, Mary Alice, as they sit together on the back steps of their forlorn little house against a skyline that clearly spells Pittsburgh.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 10, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors withdrew their case Monday against four political protesters charged last month after scaling an 8-foot security fence outside the Wells Fargo Center during the Democratic National Convention. But authorities have given no indication that they intend to do the same for the seven other Bernie Sanders supporters arrested and charged under federal law during the raucous demonstrations outside the four-day event. A spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney's Office did not respond to requests to explain the decision.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
A Rhode Island man arrested during protests outside the Democratic National Convention was carrying three "throwing knives" as he breached the eight-foot fence surrounding the Wells Fargo Center, federal prosecutors said Thursday. Jeremy Graber, 31, of Woonsocket, was among the seven demonstrators arrested Wednesday night by the Secret Service for using bolt cutters to bypass the security perimeter during the tense protests that have erupted nightly outside the convention site. Authorities signaled in court that they would seek to detain him until his trial on charges of entering a restricted zone.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, STAFF WRITER
"This case is not at all about a fence. " So said a Chester County Judge in his decision this week when he dismissed a claim by neighbors who sued to have a gay couple tear down their fence. Judge Jeffrey R. Sommer also gave the go-ahead for the couple to put in a backyard swimming pool which had been denied by a neighborhood association. "The setting for our play is Bucktoe Manor an idyllic vision of suburbia located in New Garden Township," wrote Sommer, who apparently has aspirations of being a writer.
NEWS
May 9, 2016
ISSUE | FRANKLIN SQUARE Lantern exhibit outshines fence The line to buy tickets for the Philadelphia Chinese Lantern Festival at Franklin Square curled around Race Street on Saturday, April 30 ("Festival, square worth admission," Tuesday). Within 10 minutes, and $32 lighter, my wife and I walked through the first themed exhibit - a 150-foot-long entrance arcade. The place had a magical feel. There were hundreds of people in the park, possibly a thousand. Giggles and smiles were everywhere, and cellphones were snapping pictures.
NEWS
May 7, 2016
Given its outsize notoriety, it's worth noting that the cloth-draped chain-link fence corralling Franklin Square for the Philadelphia Chinese Lantern Festival is not exactly the Great Wall. But it has caused great controversy for some good reasons. For all the suddenness with which the fence separated one of William Penn's five original squares from his "greene country towne," it's the result of a gradual accumulation of private prerogatives in public parks. Historic Philadelphia Inc., the nonprofit to which the then-shabby square was turned over a decade ago, has transformed it into a delightful urban oasis partly by virtue of money-making concessions such as a burger stand, an old-fashioned carousel, and a miniature golf course bearing adorable dollhouse versions of Philadelphia monuments.
NEWS
November 18, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAPE MAY COURT HOUSE - At 70, Joe Cohen will admit to the usual aches and pains that come with age. But even suffering something as serious as a detached retina - which would sideline most people at any age - Cohen found himself in Limoges, France, in August, competing in an international tournament in a sport that he has championed for decades. And while he says the eye condition - for which he underwent surgery when he returned from the International Fencing World Championship Tournament - prevented him from doing as well as he would have liked, it was an experience he savors.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
MAMA DESERVED better than this. She and her 12 pups were abandoned on her owner's porch this summer after authorities swooped in and arrested him, but Mama, a 5-year-old pit bull, found her forever home with Latanya Thomas, one of her owner's neighbors in the city's Logan section. But on Wednesday, Thomas made a horrific discovery when she found Mama dead, hanging by her leash on an 8-foot-high fence that separates Thomas' home from her next-door neighbor's. Pennsylvania SPCA officials called Mama's death a "blatant case of animal cruelty" and said they are investigating the incident as a crime.
NEWS
August 15, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
City officials released detailed road closure and security fencing plans Thursday for the September papal visit, and said they were working with the U.S. Secret Service to accommodate businesses that need to stay open that weekend. "We, the city, and our many, many partners . . . are working to ensure the World Meeting of Families be held in a safe and secure environment for the Holy Father, and for the hundreds and thousands and millions of faithful who will want to come and see and hear him," Nutter said, flanked by city officials and Secret Service agents based in Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The security restrictions being placed on Philadelphia for the papal visit invite comparison to the fenced-in "closed cities" of World War II. Or Manhattan after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Or American cities patrolled by National Guard troops during riots in the 1960s. Rarely has a peacetime event drawn such Draconian security measures across such a broad section of a U.S. city. Overkill is the word being used by some law enforcement and transportation officials for the sweeping shutdown of highways and bridges, and the creation of a Beirut-style "green zone" where most vehicle traffic will be forbidden.
NEWS
August 6, 2015
YOUR PERSONAL financial information can't be completely protected. With the already immeasurable list of data breaches that seems to grow longer by the day, maybe we should be praying not for protection but for better interventions. Witness the recent news involving the Federal Trade Commission and LifeLock Inc., one of the leading companies in the identity-theft-protection business. The FTC has filed charges alleging that LifeLock violated a 2010 settlement in which the company vowed to stop making deceptive claims about its services and implement stronger measures to safeguard its own customers' personal data, including credit card, Social Security and bank account numbers.
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