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Fences

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NEWS
March 25, 2000
Philadelphia is being shipped - piece by piece - to wherever there's an insatiable demand for decorative items from old houses. That's how Daily News staff writer Scott Flander described the widespread theft of Philadelphia wrought-iron fencing, ornamental grates, brass doorknobs and front-door lights, even cobblestone streets and brick sidewalks. These are stolen, for the most part, by street people or others on the edge of society who pick up a few bucks from dealers and others specializing in antiques.
NEWS
September 7, 1986 | By Charlie Frush, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Edgewater Park Township Committee has introduced an ordinance that would amend the community's zoning regulations for fences and will consider passage of the ordinance at its monthly meeting Sept. 17. One section of the ordinance would prohibit so-called privacy fences, or solid fences of any sort, in front yards. Forbidden would be any fences that are not at least 50 percent "open," allowing a view of the yard from the other side of the fence. Township administrator D. Robert Heal said this provision also would bar the insertion of plastic slats in chain-link fences in front yards.
NEWS
June 21, 1989 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
In the last three months, Mantua Township has approved three ordinances that officials have said were needed to control the problems of population growth. They are a law controlling use of all-terrain vehicles, one to regulate shooting and a third designed to save the trees on lots under development. Now the township is dealing with fences. Specifically, Mantua committeemen at their meeting June 13 presented an amendment to the zoning code that would lift the 4-foot limit allowed for property fences.
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | By Katharine Seelye, Inquirer Staff Writer
Homeowners in Haverford will be allowed to put up 6-foot solid fences if their neighborhoods are contiguous with commercial districts. The township previously allowed 6-foot fences, but the top 2 feet had to be open. Residents not contiguous with commercial districts still will be prohibited from building solid fences. The new ordinance was passed 6-0 by the Board of Commissioners on Monday night without discussion. Several residents living near commercial areas who were upset over the lack of privacy had pressed for the measure.
NEWS
June 8, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
"Maybe I shouldn't say this," I began. Carole Shorenstein Hays interrupted me with a nervous laugh. "Please don't," she said. And I didn't. We'd been on the phone hardly 10 minutes last week, but she knew what I was going to say. I was about to tell her that Fences would surely win the Tony Award for best play. I hesitated because theater people tend to be superstitious, to the extent that you're not even supposed to wish them good luck. I could have asked what she would wear to the Tony Award ceremonies last night (a maternity dress designed by Pauline Trigere)
NEWS
September 11, 1986 | By Howard Manly, Inquirer Staff Writer
It appeared to be a simple request before the Cheltenham Township Zoning Board: Some residents wanted to build a 6-foot-high fence around their back yards. The residents, many of whom purchased houses in a recently completed development called Homes of Elkins Park near two busy streets, Washington Lane and Ashbourne Road, said they wanted to keep the public from "invading their privacy. " "People can look right down your throat," said Graham Murphy, who lives on the 7800 block of Caversham Road.
SPORTS
May 27, 2004 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Jose Guillen apologized to his Anaheim Angels teammates yesterday, two days after ripping them for not backing him up after he was hit by a pitch. Guillen went on a profanity-laced tirade after the Angels' 6-5, 10-inning loss to Toronto on Monday. The Angels were off Tuesday. Guillen apologized yesterday during a team meeting, and manager Mike Scioscia said the outfielder initiated the session. "I just want to apologize to my teammates and the whole organization for those comments," the leftfielder said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
As someone who grew up with only a sister, plays about brothers (like True West ) have never spoken to me. But plays about fathers and sons? Hoo boy. So take it with the smallest grain of salt when I say People's Light and Theatre Company's staging of August Wilson's Fences is one of the best productions I've seen in years. No small part of this success stems from Wilson's Tony and Pulitzer Prize-winning script, whose conflicts could have constituted three separate plays.
SPORTS
October 7, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
The fences at Daytona and Talladega will be raised from 14 to 22 feet following a safety analysis conducted after Carl Edwards' airborne flight into the Alabama track's safety barrier. A wreck on the last lap in April's race at Talladega sent Edwards sailing into the fence. It bowed, but held and his car shot back onto the track. Debris from the accident injured seven fans in the stands, the most serious a broken jaw suffered by a teenage girl. The frontstretch fence at Talladega will be raised before the Nov. 1 race, and the backstretch will be completed during the offseason.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
James Earl Jones in "Fences," a new drama by August Wilson. Directed by Lloyd Richards, set by James D. Sandefur, costumes by Candice Donnelly, lighting by Danianne Mizzy. Presented at the 46th Street Theatre, 226 W. 46th St., New York. The so-called "magic moments" come all too seldom in the commercial theater. It happened Thursday night at the Broadway opening of August Wilson's "Fences," a drama about a black laboring man of the 1950s with a macho problem. In one of the few quiet times in a play taken most of the evening at full cry, James Earl Jones modulates his rich voice to an unselfconsciously intimate hush in conversation with his stage wife, Mary Alice, as they sit together on the back steps of their forlorn little house against a skyline that clearly spells Pittsburgh.
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NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor Nutter confirmed Thursday that parts of Philadelphia will be fenced in for security during the visit by Pope Francis in September, but dismissed speculation that the whole of Center City will be behind chain links. "Whoever is saying that somehow all of Center City is going to be shut down has no idea what they're talking about," Nutter said at a news briefing at City Hall following a trip to Mexico. "There's never been any discussion with me where the idea of all of Center City being enclosed, encapsulated, shut down, has ever been discussed," he said.
NEWS
July 8, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal officials and organizers said Monday that they are discussing the possible construction of a fence as high as 8 feet around parts of Center City as security for Pope Francis' visit in September, but that talks are still preliminary. A source involved in the event planning said portions of Center City would be surrounded by fencing, but that the footprint of the security perimeter is being worked out and is largely contingent on the pope's Philadelphia itinerary, which could change in the next three months.
NEWS
December 13, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia jeweler who fenced diamonds worth more than $3 million for a group of thieves who targeted shops across the country was sentenced Wednesday in federal court to 71/2 months in prison. Eric Janovsky, 44, also was sentenced to 71/2 months of home confinement by U.S. District Judge Marco A. Hernandez in Portland, Ore., where the case was prosecuted. And Hernandez also ordered Janovsky and his Jewelers' Row business, Three Gold Bros., to pay $539,843 in restitution.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
As someone who grew up with only a sister, plays about brothers (like True West ) have never spoken to me. But plays about fathers and sons? Hoo boy. So take it with the smallest grain of salt when I say People's Light and Theatre Company's staging of August Wilson's Fences is one of the best productions I've seen in years. No small part of this success stems from Wilson's Tony and Pulitzer Prize-winning script, whose conflicts could have constituted three separate plays.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2014 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the veteran rockers who make up the Baseball Project first got together, their ambitions were pretty modest. "Once Scott [McCaughey] and I decided we were going to write those songs . . . we just wanted to get them recorded and maybe, maybe, just maybe put them out on a 100-LP vinyl release," Steve Wynn recalls. "We felt a calling, a need, a compulsion to have these songs exist, and we didn't even have a band name when we made the [first] record," says the former leader of the Dream Syndicate, who now fronts the Miracle 3. "If you had told me in 2007 that we would still be doing this and touring and on our third record, I would have been surprised and delighted.
SPORTS
October 30, 2013 | By Les Bowen, Daily News Staff Writer
MAYBE THE biggest surprise in the Eagles' loss to the Giants Sunday was that the Birds weren't able to break LeSean McCoy loose, after talking all week about making adjustments to reverse a monthlong downward trend in rushing numbers. Even if Michael Vick hadn't reinjured his hamstring, the Eagles were hardly going to put everything on his back; McCoy was a focal point in this game, and his struggle to gain 48 yards on 15 carries might have had as much to do with keeping the offense scoreless as did the rookie mistakes of QB Matt Barkley.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
When 12-year-old Trystan Nash felt misunderstood by the other kids at school, her mother realized the Oreland tween's aggression needed some channeling. "She drew a picture that was a little bit on the violent side - it involved a blade," recalled Sara Nash. Perhaps fencing might be a way to handle those blades productively? Trystan discovered the sport was, indeed, her passion. In just a year, she became an advanced fencer who takes two-hour lessons three days a week. She's not the only one. Fencing, a full-contact martial art that involves fighting with swords - foil, sabre, and épée - has caught on nationwide, most notably among kids younger than 14, and especially in the Philadelphia division.
SPORTS
August 9, 2013 | By Zach Helfand And Mike Still, Inquirer Staff Writers
As practice ended Wednesday at the NovaCare Complex, Patriots defensive lineman Rob Ninkovich passed by Eagles receiver Greg Salas. He tapped him on the shoulder pad, then mimed a one-handed grab by throwing one hand upward. Salas smiled. His play during practice moments earlier had impressed even the Patriots. Salas is fighting for a job at wide receiver. Near the end of practice, Matt Barkley threw him a 40-yard pass down the sideline. Logan Ryan was between Salas and the ball, so Salas went over Ryan with one hand and brought in the catch.
SPORTS
August 8, 2013 | By Mike Still, Inquirer Staff Writer
No Shakira. No Black Eyed Peas. No Kanye West. In addition to having Tom Brady and the New England Patriots lining up on the other side of the ball, Eagles practice was a little different from usual on Tuesday. The loud, up-tempo music that regularly blares overhead during training camp at the NovaCare Complex was missing. "No music was weird," linebacker DeMeco Ryans said. "It was like, 'Why is it so quiet out here?' "   Kelly barks A testy Chip Kelly became a bit more vocal on the practice field than he typically has been at training camp.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
A BICYCLIST was critically injured after he was found impaled on a fence in Fairmount Park, police said. Police found the man about 2 a.m. yesterday after receiving a call that led them to Martin Luther King Drive. There is a dip in that section of the road, police said, and the man maight have lost control and fell. He had apparently been cycling toward the thoroughfare down Black Road. According to Howard Hochheiser, president of the Bicycle Club of Philadelphia, Black Road is steep and often covered in gravel.
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