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Feral Cats

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NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Radnor Township officials got an earful Monday night - about cats. At a packed meeting of the board of commissioners, animal rights organizations, cat rescue groups, and others voiced their opinions about a proposed ordinance that would regulate the feeding of feral felines. At the same meeting, commissioners passed a resolution supporting groups involved in trap, neuter, and release (TNR) programs for cats at large. "It was a step in the right direction," said Kathy Siciliano, an animal rights advocate from Bryn Mawr.
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
At dusk, they appear: lounging on porches, sprawled across cars, picking through the weeds in abandoned lots in Coatesville. Residents call the situation "torture. " City officials have been swamped with calls. "I couldn't even go in my backyard. You couldn't see nothing but the cats," said Michelle Adderton, of the 700 block of Diamond Street. "I couldn't go out my back door because there were kittens on the porch. " Adderton and other residents of the Chester County city of 13,000 fear that Coatesville is going to the cats.
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  For the last three years, Michael T. Baker tried to help rid Gloucester City of feral cats. "He was one of our trappers. He was such a good kitten catcher," his wife, Doran, said in a phone interview. Mr. Baker was a member of Feral Treasures, for which his wife is secretary. The local nonprofit organization promotes the reduction of wild cat populations through a policy of trapping, neutering, and releasing. On Sunday, May 18, Mr. Baker, 49, of Gloucester City, a 20-year employee of Lockheed Martin Corp.
NEWS
October 8, 2003 | By Amy Worden and Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The feral cats of Pennsylvania cashed in yesterday on more than a few of their nine lives. Bowing to pressure from lawmakers and cat rescue groups across the state, the Pennsylvania Game Commission dropped a proposal to outlaw releasing feral cats after capturing and neutering them. The commission, in a second ruling, also softened a controversial proposal that would have required turkey hunters to wear more fluorescent orange. The feral cat strategy, called "trap, neuter and return," is supported by many cat rescue groups as the most humane way to deal with abandoned cats that are not adoptable and the best way to reduce stray cat populations.
NEWS
February 26, 1996 | By Ty Tagami, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Some might call them "kitty kitty," but Gary Unzeitig says the passel of homeless felines that bully his dog, piddle on his woodpile and befoul his sidewalk and lawn are anything but cute. "These guys are mean," he said. He also called them an "unchecked, major-league health hazard. " A bricklayer, Unzeitig trudges from his home before the sun rises and returns after it sets. There is nothing worse after a long day of work, he said, than dodging the piles of cat scat that litter the walk from his driveway to his door.
NEWS
June 27, 2002
Free-roaming cats raise parasite risk on beach I was appalled to learn that 136 cats have been trapped, spayed or neutered, and returned to live out their lives under Atlantic City's Boardwalk - with the city's blessing. While Jan Hefler's June 24 article, "Lines drawn over control of feral cats," mentioned some of the problems associated with free-roaming cats, it failed to mention parasites that can infect people who come into contact with sand contaminated by cat feces.
NEWS
October 4, 2003 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The Pennsylvania Game Commission usually is embroiled in disputes such as deer-season restrictions or turkey-hunting attire. Now it is taking heat for trying to regulate a different kind of wildlife: feral cats. The commission is scheduled to vote Tuesday on a proposal to outlaw the release of feral cats that are trapped and neutered, in a program widely praised for reducing the stray-cat population. The move, which the commission says is needed to curtail the spread of diseases and protect birds, has touched off a contretemps between feline fanciers and bird lovers.
NEWS
November 24, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
AS WINTER'S CHILL blankets the Delaware riverfront, Teresa Reed and Tracey McKenna are losing time in a race that could mean life or death for dozens of abandoned cats in a colony at Pier 70 in South Philadelphia. Since a promised donation of new materials to build shelters for the cats on the pier fell through in recent weeks, the women - two among a group of people who care for the 30-some cats there - are scrambling to track down enough makeshift kitty shelters to protect the felines from the elements.
NEWS
October 11, 2010
This is another in our series about people who make things happen. If you know people who roll up their sleeves and make things happen, let us know and I will share their stories with our readers. THE CALICO STALKED the lump of salmon like a lion in tall grass stalking a wildebeest. A smaller, raven-black male mimicked her every move from a safe distance. After four or five passes around the front of the trap, she took a furtive step onto a blue pillow case that lined the bottom of the steel mesh enclosure.
NEWS
August 15, 2014
IT WAS ALMOST a decade ago, on, yes, a dark and stormy night, when a few dozen animal activists came together to talk about making Philadelphia a "no-kill" city for homeless animals. There was serious talk and a soft goal of 10 years. Everyone went home happy, but with no action plan, just a gauzy expectation that if everyone pulled together, things would change. Things did change. They got worse. Good intentions can't beat bad practices and the city shelter was a house of horrors.
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NEWS
November 24, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
AS WINTER'S CHILL blankets the Delaware riverfront, Teresa Reed and Tracey McKenna are losing time in a race that could mean life or death for dozens of abandoned cats in a colony at Pier 70 in South Philadelphia. Since a promised donation of new materials to build shelters for the cats on the pier fell through in recent weeks, the women - two among a group of people who care for the 30-some cats there - are scrambling to track down enough makeshift kitty shelters to protect the felines from the elements.
NEWS
August 15, 2014
IT WAS ALMOST a decade ago, on, yes, a dark and stormy night, when a few dozen animal activists came together to talk about making Philadelphia a "no-kill" city for homeless animals. There was serious talk and a soft goal of 10 years. Everyone went home happy, but with no action plan, just a gauzy expectation that if everyone pulled together, things would change. Things did change. They got worse. Good intentions can't beat bad practices and the city shelter was a house of horrors.
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  For the last three years, Michael T. Baker tried to help rid Gloucester City of feral cats. "He was one of our trappers. He was such a good kitten catcher," his wife, Doran, said in a phone interview. Mr. Baker was a member of Feral Treasures, for which his wife is secretary. The local nonprofit organization promotes the reduction of wild cat populations through a policy of trapping, neutering, and releasing. On Sunday, May 18, Mr. Baker, 49, of Gloucester City, a 20-year employee of Lockheed Martin Corp.
NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Radnor Township officials got an earful Monday night - about cats. At a packed meeting of the board of commissioners, animal rights organizations, cat rescue groups, and others voiced their opinions about a proposed ordinance that would regulate the feeding of feral felines. At the same meeting, commissioners passed a resolution supporting groups involved in trap, neuter, and release (TNR) programs for cats at large. "It was a step in the right direction," said Kathy Siciliano, an animal rights advocate from Bryn Mawr.
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
At dusk, they appear: lounging on porches, sprawled across cars, picking through the weeds in abandoned lots in Coatesville. Residents call the situation "torture. " City officials have been swamped with calls. "I couldn't even go in my backyard. You couldn't see nothing but the cats," said Michelle Adderton, of the 700 block of Diamond Street. "I couldn't go out my back door because there were kittens on the porch. " Adderton and other residents of the Chester County city of 13,000 fear that Coatesville is going to the cats.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
By Charles Lane Former President George W. Bush's dog Barney has gone to that great kennel club in the sky. But I'll bet Barney died smiling. He lived to see the day when humans finally acknowledged that cats are a menace. In fact, government-affiliated scientists have produced statistical proof of feline perfidy, in a new study showing that cats stalk and kill 2.4 billion birds and 12.3 billion mammals in the United States each year, give or take a few billion. This "kill rate" is two to four times higher than previously believed, and worse than that attributable to windmills, cars, and other "anthropogenic" threats.
NEWS
October 6, 2012
Feral cats While "Addressing feral-cat population" (Sept. 26) suggests methods by which to control that population, those ideas first need to become law and be enforced. This does not help the current population, for which the only options are abandonment, leaving the cats to chance and encouraging uncontrolled growth, and shelters, which frequently deem feral cats and panicked strays "unadoptable" and kill them. Trap-neuter-release (TNR) programs provide a humane option by controlling the population growth and reducing the spread of disease through vaccination.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Out behind her house, Renee Cureton calls in a high-pitched voice. "Come on, babies!" One by one, wary cats emerge - Precious, Tabby, Junior, Sneezy - lured by the smell of the food she puts out. They are but a few of Philadelphia's burgeoning population of "free-roaming" cats - a catch-all term that includes everything from friendly cats that are lost or abandoned to prickly feral cats that for years have survived the tough life on the streets....
NEWS
October 11, 2010
This is another in our series about people who make things happen. If you know people who roll up their sleeves and make things happen, let us know and I will share their stories with our readers. THE CALICO STALKED the lump of salmon like a lion in tall grass stalking a wildebeest. A smaller, raven-black male mimicked her every move from a safe distance. After four or five passes around the front of the trap, she took a furtive step onto a blue pillow case that lined the bottom of the steel mesh enclosure.
NEWS
September 8, 2010 | By ANTHONY CAMPISI
THE PROBLEM: There's a large vacant lot on Edward Williams' block that's been causing problems. The city hasn't cleaned it this year, and it's now overgrown with weeds - some of which are taller than 10 feet - and colonized by feral cats. Williams wants the lot, on Filbert and Salford streets in West Philadelphia, cleaned. "You can't even see the sidewalk on Filbert Street," he complained. POTENTIAL BUYERS. It turns out Williams isn't the only person interested in the lot. Erik Gordon, who lives across the street, says he and three or four neighbors have been talking about buying it. They want to clear out the weeds and cats - Gordon says the block smells of cat urine - and start a business selling and fixing cars there.
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