CollectionsFerrari
IN THE NEWS

Ferrari

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
May 8, 1989 | By Gary Miles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kevin Ruch had it all figured out. The 1986 La Salle University graduate would hang with the pack for most of yesterday's 10-mile Broad Street Run, then bolt to the lead in the final mile and collect the $500 victory winnings. The money, said Ruch of Camp Hill, Pa., would go toward a crib for the baby he and his wife are expecting in three weeks. But Brian Ferrari of Jerome, Pa., spoiled Ruch's plan. Running right behind Ruch for most of the race and using him as a shield against a strong head wind, Ferrari took the lead after eight miles and won the race in 49 minutes and 10 seconds.
NEWS
June 2, 1992 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The economy, as everyone knows, is somewhat shaky, so Bob Turney, ever the pragmatist, says he's willing to break tradition and dicker slightly to move the shiny red car off the showroom floor. "We'll probably come down a little from the 431 for it," he said. The "it" is a Ferrari F40, a special edition of the car constructed to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the manufacturer. The "431" is an abbreviation for the price. Carried out numerically, it looks like this: $431,000.
NEWS
April 19, 1996 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Vineland man in a stolen car led Bellmawr police on a chase through several municipalities yesterday before his car flipped over a stump in Oaklyn Borough, snapping a telephone pole in half, authorities said. Richard S. Hatcher, 19, of the 800 block of East Walnut Avenue in Vineland, was temporarily trapped in the crushed car. He was taken to Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center in Camden, where he remained in critical but stable condition last night. He suffered a fractured spine, a collapsed lung, a ruptured spleen, a broken pelvis and neck fractures, said Oaklyn Borough Lt. Chris Ferrari.
NEWS
March 11, 1989 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Superior Court judge yesterday tossed out a Haddon Township ordinance allowing Public Safety Director Mario J. Ferrari to act as the de facto police chief. Judge Paul G. Lowengrub told Haddon Township Solicitor Joseph Sandone that as long as the municipality has a job slot for a police chief, "it may not delegate the police function to anyone other than someone designated as the chief of police. " Sandone said that he did not know what the township would do next, but that officials were reluctant to abolish the position of police chief, which has been vacant since longtime Chief Robert Saunders retired last year.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | By Robert DiGiacomo And Rich Heidorn Jr., Special to The Inquirer
The Haddon Township Commissioners said yesterday that they would fill their vacant police chief's post as a result of a court ruling last week stripping Public Safety Director Mario J. Ferrari of his day-to-day control over the township's 25-member department. Mayor William Park said the commissioners would choose the new chief from among the department's four top-ranking officers: Capt. Thomas Boody and Lts. Harold Armstrong, Walter Aaron and Charles Gooley. Park said the commissioners planned to interview the candidates next week and select the new chief at their meeting April 4. Park said the board would decide whether Ferrari would remain in his $32,000-a-year post after the chief was appointed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2010
9 tonight USA After hitting some potholes (and plot holes) in seasons two and three, this show has been humming like a finely tuned Ferrari in season four, with great stories and fine work by stars Jeffrey Donovan (right) and Gabrielle Anwar (left).
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Haddon Township Public Safety Director Mario J. Ferrari is violating state law by serving as the township's de-facto police chief, Camden County Prosecutor Samuel Asbell contended in a civil suit filed yesterday in Superior Court. Asbell, who clashed with Ferrari last month when he attempted to obtain evidence from the Haddon Township police, asked the court to enjoin Ferrari from exercising day-to-day control over the township's police force. Because the post of police chief is vacant, the highest-ranking officer, Capt.
NEWS
June 29, 1998 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Two borough police officers contend that the chief and the department's lieutenant retalidated against them by, among other things, ordering a "demeaning streetlight survey" in violation of the state's whistle-blower act. In a lawsuit, Sgt. William Hancock and Patrolman John Warner contend they were brought up on more than 14 frivolous and false departmental charges after they contacted the state Attorney General's Office and the mayor about an...
NEWS
March 13, 1995 | By Terri Sanginiti, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A 38-year-old Westville man with "an extensive criminal history" was arrested early Saturday after he cut a bar patron with a broken beer bottle during an altercation over the victim's girlfriend, authorities said. Edward D. Gilbrook, of Highland Avenue, is being held on $30,000 cash bail. The early morning fight, outside RT's Nightclub, landed an Audubon man in the hospital. Gilbrook was charged with aggravated assault, possession of a weapon and conspiracy. The suspect's brother, Michael Gilbrook, 35, was also charged with aggravated assault and conspiracy in connection with the incident.
NEWS
August 8, 1998 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Superior Court judge yesterday ruled that a whistle-blower's lawsuit against an Oaklyn Borough police lieutenant should go to trial. Judge Irvin Snyder denied a motion, filed on behalf of Lt. Christopher Ferrari, to dismiss the complaint. The lawsuit was filed by two police officers, Sgt. William Hancock and Patrolman John Warner, who say Ferrari harassed them after they accused him of misusing $1,500 in special state funds. The suit, which also names Police Chief Ronald Frumento, Mayor Vincent Scriboni, the borough, and unnamed borough officials, seeks $9.5 million in damages.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stella Ferrari Conaway, 92, of West Chester, a respected voice teacher and performer, died Thursday, Jan. 8, her 61st wedding anniversary, of Alzheimer's disease at Simpson Meadows, Downingtown. Mrs. Conaway was a trained soprano, and her husband, Wayne Elias Conaway, a trained tenor; the two performed classical music and opera duets up and down the East Coast. The venues were local auditoriums where they often sang to benefit music clubs, he said. She earned academic degrees in music from the Philadelphia Conservatory of Music - now part of the University of the Arts - and joined the faculty of the music department at West Chester University.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"THE COUNSELOR" warns eloquently and at length about the threat posed by spreading drug violence, but the effect is surprising. After an uneventful hour of watching this windy gabfest, here's what you're thinking: "Shoot somebody, already. " I mean, there's not much doubt about what's to come. Among the first images? A couple of swells (Cameron Diaz, Javier Bardem) mix Manhattans and watch their pet cheetahs chase down jackrabbits in the border country desert. It's foreshadowing to a fault, and in case you miss the implication, here comes a small army of prestigious actors to drop eloquent hints - via the language of screenwriter Cormac McCarthy - about the carnage to come.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The sound of bugles echoed across the grounds of the Radnor Hunt Club around 1:25 p.m. Saturday, and 12 horses trotted toward the starting line of the afternoon's first steeplechase run. Officially, the 83d annual Radnor Hunt Races were about to begin. But by then the festivities already were in full gallop. Thousands of patrons surrounding the track - many of whom had already spent hours eating, drinking, and socializing - swelled toward the fences to catch a glimpse of the race, and most sported their finest racetrack attire: bright sundresses and extravagant hats for the women, tweed blazers and ties for the men. The scene resembled a jubilant lawn party, a blend of sport, drink, dining, and mingling, and many attendees Saturday were quick to express their love of the festivities.
NEWS
November 30, 2011
Sergio Scaglietti, 91, who used intuitive genius and a hammer - seldom blueprints or sketches - to sculpt elegant Ferraris that won Grand Prix races in the 1950s and '60s and that now sell for millions of dollars, died Nov. 20 at his home in Modena, Italy. Ferraris, with their hair-raising acceleration and sleek lines, bespoke postwar modernity in the manner of the Color Field paintings of Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko or the architecture of Eero Saarinen. Mr. Scaglietti in the 1950s designed the bloodred skin of the 375mm sports car that film director Roberto Rossellini, the master of neorealist cinema, gave to his wife, Ingrid Bergman.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles M. Pierson, 58, of Schwenksville, a Ferrari restorer and jazz musician, died of lung cancer Thursday, April 21, at home. The son of a General Electric Co. engineer, Mr. Pierson began playing with cars when he was 12. At 16, he bought a 1959 Ford Galaxy 500 for $25, restored it, and sold it for $400. He graduated from Conestoga High School, where he played lacrosse. He was offered a college scholarship but declined. "I always knew I wanted to work with my hands," he told Inquirer reporter Art Carey this month.
SPORTS
September 13, 2010 | From Staff and Wire Reports
TOLEDO, Ohio - Cherry Hill's Tom Hessert took the lead on the fourth circuit and led 133 laps at Toledo Speedway before a broken sway bar on his No. 77 Cherry Hill Classic Cars Dodge caused him to lose four laps on his way to a seventh-place finish Sunday in the Northwest Ohio Ford Dealers 200. Chris Buescher earned his second ARCA Racing Series victory of his career. The 17-year-old driver raced from the 23d starting position into contention, taking the lead for good on lap 173 of the 200-lap race when Joey Coulter, who was leading, was slowed by a flat.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2010
9 tonight USA After hitting some potholes (and plot holes) in seasons two and three, this show has been humming like a finely tuned Ferrari in season four, with great stories and fine work by stars Jeffrey Donovan (right) and Gabrielle Anwar (left).
SPORTS
January 24, 2010 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Dependability and predictability are great qualities for a baseball starting pitcher, and the way Ruben Amaro Jr. sees it, Joe Blanton is the roster equivalent of a washing machine that earns a solid "good" from Consumer Reports. Maybe there are models out there that look better on the showroom floor. Maybe some can deliver brighter colors and crisper whites. But throw the switch on the Blantonator and the clothes will get washed. "We know what we're going to get," Amaro said when the Phillies signed Blanton to a three-year, $24 million contract last week.
SPORTS
October 2, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
Oprah Winfrey, David Robinson, Nadia Comaneci and Michele Obama hobnobbed with International Olympic Committee members in Copenhagen on behalf of Chicago's bid to win the 2016 Summer Games. Chicago, which will get an added booster when President Obama arrives today, might be considered the favorite going into today's IOC vote, but plenty of cities that were sure things have ended up watching someone else celebrate. Another bidder, Rio de Janeiro, has a compelling argument, asking the IOC to take the games to South America for the first time, while Madrid has the backing of former IOC president Juan Antonio Samaranch.
SPORTS
October 1, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
The NBA is instituting a policy regarding Twitter and other social media sites, banning players from using them during games. The league sent a memo to teams yesterday telling them that cell phones and other communication devices can't be used from 45 minutes before game time until after players have finished their responsibilities after games. That includes halftime. The rule applies to "coaches, players and other team basketball operations personnel. " The memo does not specify penalties for violation of the rule, and says teams are free to create their own policies for practices and other team events.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|