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NEWS
August 19, 1999 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey can't sue fertilizer manufacturers for the deadly 1993 terrorist bombing of the World Trade Center, a federal appeals court in Philadelphia ruled yesterday. The fertilizer products "were not in and of themselves dangerous but were merely the raw materials or components that terrorists used in combination with other ingredients to build a bomb," wrote Judge Jane R. Roth of the U.S. 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals. Manufacturers "have no duty to prevent a criminal misuse of their products which is entirely foreign to the purpose for which the product was intended," added Roth, affirming the dismissal of the case.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Consider the myriad lawn problems of Matthew W. Strader. People expect his lawn to be a vivid green, even when the summer sun has turned every other lawn a dull brown. They expect his lawn to be free of stones, ruts and bald spots - even after they've tromped across it in their spikes, sped over it in their little carts and sliced chunks out of it with their clubs. Strader is the golf-course superintendent at Melrose Country Club, which encompasses 130 acres of rolling, tree-studded turf straddling the Tacony Creek in Melrose Park, Montgomery County.
NEWS
November 20, 1987 | BY DONALD KAUL
American industry does not get the credit it deserves. It gets held up to constant ridicule by critics who compare it to its Japanese or German counterparts. Admittedly, we have a problem or two. We can't make cars that work. We can't make steel that anyone wants to buy. Our weapons systems are harmless. Nobody's perfect. But when it comes to sheer creativity, the ability to come up with ingenious solutions to seemingly insoluble problems, there's no one who can match us; the latest example of which was provided just the other day. The New York Times reported that Kerr-McGee Corp.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A plan to use sewage sludge as a fertilizer on the Aman Farm in West Vincent Township has angered East Pikeland residents who live down the road from the farm. Residents told East Pikeland supervisors Tuesday night they feared that sludge dumped on the 135-acre Pughtown Road farm could contaminate the nearby French Creek and pollute underground wells because of the farm's high water tables. They said they are gathering support to oppose AD+SOIL Inc.'s permit application to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources for the agricultural use of sewage sludge.
NEWS
October 4, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a move that seems to fly in the face of its moniker - the Garden State - New Jersey is getting ready to put the pinch on fertilizer. Bills that would limit fertilizer's use on lawns - restricting everything from what kind can be applied, to when and where it can be put down - are before the state Legislature, and are shaping up to be the nation's most restrictive. Despite some industry opposition, supporters expect to have a final version on the governor's desk by year's end. A major focus is to help turn around troubled Barnegat Bay in Ocean County.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
In what could signal an energy corridor south of the Walt Whitman Bridge, a Houston energy-transportation company has signed a long-term lease with the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority to ship dry bulk commodities - initially fertilizer - into Pier 122, a strategic finger pier on the Delaware River between Packer Avenue Marine Terminal and the proposed Southport Marine Terminal at the eastern end of the Navy Yard. US Development Group L.L.C., which primarily uses rail to move liquid hydrocarbons such as crude oil and ethanol from producers to end users, such as refineries, is taking over a 20-year lease from Growmark Inc., a Midwestern agricultural co-op that ships imported fertilizer through the Camden port and ultimately to U.S. farmers.
NEWS
April 25, 1995 | By Carol Morello and Michael Matza, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
As the manhunt for the bomber they call John Doe 2 continued, authorities stepped up their scrutiny of this military hub in America's heartland, where the mundane - feed and fertilizer operations, Army surplus stores, even a self-storage garage - may yield clues to murder. This place of prairie farms and ranches is home to the Big Red One infantry division, and it is in this stretch of flat earth where suspect Timothy McVeigh first met Terry Nichols, a man taken into custody by the FBI as a material witness.
LIVING
April 22, 1994 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is a story that, we promise, will not raise a stink. It is a story that will try to avoid the dunghill of cute allusions to . . . Oh, why even try? It's about cow dung. Dried, baked pieces of cow dung sculpted to look like tiny animals that sit in gardens and slowly fertilize all that yearns to grow. It's about two former executives who formed a Central New Jersey firm named Tewksbury Gardens, which has no gardens . . . two men who run a seven-person operation in western Chester County, in a roadside warehouse with no company sign outside . . . an operation that relies on about 30 Amish folks who hand- mold manure into figurines, but are said to be too shy to let any journalists watch.
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | By Lisa Suhay, FOR THE INQUIRER
An opalescent glass inkwell, a century old. A purplish gemstone set in ocean-blackened silver. Pieces of eight. And all along a storm-torn beach, a wreath of sun-bleached bones. The sea taketh away, and giveth back. The March 13 blizzard that whipped the Shore with 60 m.p.h. gusts and high tides also laid bare, on Long Beach Island, a minor treasure of artifacts from the last three centuries. In the last few days, beachcombers and collectors have been out in force, walking through the mists along the island's 18-mile beach with metal detectors and buckets to harvest the storm's fruits.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Department of Environmental Resources has received dozens of letters from East Pikeland residents opposing a plan to spread sewage sludge on the Aman Farm on the eastern edge of West Vincent Township, DER spokeswoman Chris Novak said Thursday. DER's public-comment period on an application from AD+SOIL, a Kennett Square firm, for a permit to use the sludge as fertilizer on Wheeler Aman's Pughtown Road farm will end Saturday, Novak said. Residents of the Kimberbrae development, which is half in East Pikeland and half in West Vincent, said they had distributed about 500 form letters to be sent to DER to protest the plan.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 23, 2016 | By Ellen Dunkel, STAFF WRITER
BalletX is 10 this year, and the company is celebrating this weekend with a retrospective and a world premiere. The show opened Wednesday night at the Wilma Theater. If you've seen the company over the years, the show will spark memories of special performances. If you're a newbie, enjoy the sample pack of bite-sized excerpts. The evening opens with co-founder Matthew Neenan's 2005 piece Frequencies , set to music by Jump Little Children, about a trio of angels with wings on their backs and also wings represented by their fluttering arms.
BUSINESS
February 29, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
MILLVILLE, N.J. - The Espoma Co., a leading producer of organic fertilizer, still uses largely the same natural soil-enriching ingredients it did when it was founded nearly 90 years ago. What's different now is that organic gardening has moved from the obscure corners of garden centers into the mainstream, shifting Espoma into a comfortable position in a thriving niche of the lawn- and garden-supply industry. "It used to be we had to downplay the organics when we were selling it because the organics always had some baggage with it - it smells, it doesn't work, it's too expensive," said Jeremy Brunner, 43, Espoma's vice president, who represents the fourth generation of family ownership.
NEWS
February 12, 2016
DEAR ABBY: "Roger" and I have been seeing each other for two years. (We are both 50.) He is very handsome. We go to movies, ride our bikes together, work out at the gym, and attend other events. He calls me every night, sends emails during the day - even calls me when he's on a break from work. He never asks me to pay for anything and sends me flowers on special occasions. He will kiss me goodnight, but he has never held my hand or been affectionate in any other way. People we see think we're married or seriously dating and have asked about it. He tells them we just "hang out" and that he's just a friend.
NEWS
January 3, 2016
Too many women give up on in vitro fertilization too soon, a new study suggests. After analyzing more than 250,000 in vitro fertilization attempts by more than 150,000 women over nearly a decade, researchers found that women could keep increasing their chances of having a live birth through up to nine IVF cycles, according to a report in the Journal of the American Medical Association. What's more, the researchers defined an IVF cycle more expansively. Instead of considering each attempt to transfer one or more embryos into the womb as an individual cycle, study authors counted each attempt to stimulate the ovaries and retrieve eggs as the beginning of a new cycle.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
In what could signal an energy corridor south of the Walt Whitman Bridge, a Houston energy-transportation company has signed a long-term lease with the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority to ship dry bulk commodities - initially fertilizer - into Pier 122, a strategic finger pier on the Delaware River between Packer Avenue Marine Terminal and the proposed Southport Marine Terminal at the eastern end of the Navy Yard. US Development Group L.L.C., which primarily uses rail to move liquid hydrocarbons such as crude oil and ethanol from producers to end users, such as refineries, is taking over a 20-year lease from Growmark Inc., a Midwestern agricultural co-op that ships imported fertilizer through the Camden port and ultimately to U.S. farmers.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's new governor pitched the state to the energy industry Tuesday morning during a conference at the Convention Center. "We should be fertile ground for you to come and do your business," Gov. Wolf said in a speech at Globalcon, an event for the energy industry hosted by the Association of Energy Engineers. Pennsylvania will be increasingly friendly to energy-efficient businesses under his administration, Wolf said. He also touted his plan to reduce the corporate income tax. The tax currently is 9.99 percent; Wolf said he wants it reduced to 5.99 percent by next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Plant spring bulbs now. The earlier you plant bulbs, the longer they'll have time to grow roots before cold weather sets in. You can plant each bulb in a separate hole, but if you dig larger holes to fit a number of bulbs together, they'll come up in more natural-looking clusters. Each bulb should be planted to a depth three times its diameter. After you've dug the hole to the correct depth, lightly sprinkle bulb fertilizer in the bottom of the hole to stimulate root growth, then cover the fertilizer with a half-inch of soil to avoid burning the roots.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barry Ersek was a precocious lawn-care magnate. Steve Lange was a self-taught plant scientist at a Delaware bank that wanted brighter gardens. With 35 employees, they now run Holganix (as in holistic organics ), a Glen Mills company that manufactures liquid compost-starter - their brew of fermented, pasteurized and refrigerated sugars, bacteria and yeast - plus cooling units, jugs and applicators to spread it on lawns, farms and ballfields. Sales to NFL teams, Ivy League colleges, and landscaping services that want to use less chemical fertilizer and pest-killer nearly tripled in each of the last three years, to $4.4 million, landing Holganix on this year's Inc. 500 list of fast-growing U.S. firms.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Keys, Williams expecting babies It's on again for "It's on Again" singer Alicia Keys ! She's expecting her second child with hub Swizz Beatz , the hip-hopster who in April was accepted to Harvard Business School. The couple confirmed the rumors on their fourth wedding anniversary Thursday. Their son, Egypt Daoud , was born in October 2010. How I Met Your Mother 's Ashley Williams , 35, who also works as a certified doula - she has assisted in 50 births - says she and hub Neal Dodson are expecting their first bairn.
NEWS
July 13, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST CAPE MAY - Chef Lucas Manteca is on his farm this weekday morning with a lot of catching up to do. He has named this patch of 10 acres Fincas del Mar - farms of the sea - and that's what it is: unusually fertile soil, tucked in by ocean, the bay, and a canal, and tantalizingly close to the gourmet restaurants spawned by the Shore scene. "I discovered this completely different world that nobody knows exists," he says. "It's like the Riviera, almost. Italy. I would say Mediterranean.
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