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Fetus

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NEWS
November 17, 1991 | By Lea Sitton, Inquirer Staff Writer
An aborted female fetus was found in a toilet inside the women's restroom of a Center City hotel yesterday, police said. The fetus was likely 4 to 6 months old, although the exact age will not be determined until after an examination at the Medical Examiner's Office this morning, an official said. The exam will also determine whether the abortion was natural - that is, spontaneous - or whether it was induced. The fetus was found shortly after 5:30 p.m. in the front-lobby restroom of the Radisson Suites hotel in the 1800 block of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway by night manager Davina Thurmond, detectives said.
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
When does a fetus become a person? The question has haunted the abortion issue, and now, for perhaps the first time in the country, it has arisen here in a criminal case. Lazaro Pedrosa, 35, admitted stabbing his pregnant live-in girlfriend, Anna Serrano, 26, in 1989. In doing so, he wounded the 5-month-old fetus, and the baby was born premature and deformed. Last month, Pedrosa pleaded guilty to two charges of aggravated assault, involving the wounding of both the mother and the fetus, despite objections by the Defender Association that a fetus is not a person.
NEWS
May 18, 1994 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
The California Supreme Court this week held that a person can be convicted of murder for causing the death of a fetus that could have been legally aborted. That decision is unquestionably a monumental one with serious implications for both pro-choice and pro-life communities. Frankly, I never understood how any court could take a different position in a society that insists it has a unique reverence for life. I stand firmly against abortions, for almost any reason. My view was formulated when I witnessed, close up, the results of an abortion.
NEWS
April 26, 1989 | By Elizabeth Hallowell, Special to The Inquirer
Legislation that would make the accidental or purposeful killing of a viable fetus a felony passed the state House of Representatives yesterday without dissent. The measures would not apply to women seeking legal abortions or physicians performing them. Under the legislation, which consists of three bills that now go to the state Senate, a person who causes the death of a viable fetus in the process of murdering or trying to murder or cause "serious physical injury" to a pregnant woman would be guilty of first-degree feticide, a felony punishable by up to 30 years in prison.
NEWS
August 13, 1999 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The charge is homicide of an unborn child. Municipal Judge Felice R. Stack called it "murder one" after ordering ex-con Cornell Dowling, 23, to stand trial for causing the death of a 6-month-old fetus by battering his pregnant girlfriend on July 13. Dowling also was held for trial for the assault on Denise Stoner, 28. "If he would have just left," cried Stoner, an exotic dancer, during a hearing for Dowling yesterday. "My baby would be alive. I told him to leave. He wouldn't leave.
NEWS
March 15, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The courtroom spectators sat in disbelief. Several shook their heads. They were reacting to the case of a man accused of stealing an 8-month-old fetus. Lab technician Robert Williams, 32, says he had not known that the fetus was wrapped up inside a stretcher he took last Sept. 3. When he found out, Williams, of Walnut Lane near Pulaski Avenue, panicked, said Assistant District Attorney Lauren Kelly. Williams, who wanted the stretcher for his side business of transporting bodies for funeral homes, drove the fetus from the grounds of Presbyterian Hospital to his mother's Georges Lane home.
NEWS
May 2, 1989 | By Elizabeth Hallowell, Special to The Inquirer
Despite objections from the state's top medical officials, Delaware might soon have a law that would make the accidental or purposeful killing of a viable fetus a felony, except in cases of legal abortions. A package of bills drafted by state Attorney General Charles M. Oberly 3d would make it a separate, first-degree felony offense to kill a viable fetus while in the process of murdering or trying to harm a pregnant woman. In addition, the measures would make it a lesser felony to cause the death of a viable fetus through an automobile accident in which the person at fault was driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Natise Johnson, 21, was only hours away from delivering a healthy baby girl when she was shot four times and killed on March 27, said a deputy medical examiner. The fetus survived for 15 minutes, but without her mother's oxygen, she died, testified Dr. Ian Hood during a preliminary hearing for the confessed killer yesterday. "The unborn child was in all respects perfectly formed," said Hood. "The baby died slowly, and after the mother died. " "I'm sorry I killed Natise and her baby," said Kareem Sampson, 20, in a statement to Homicide Detective Howard Peterman, read during a preliminary hearing.
NEWS
July 16, 2001 | By Donald H. Powell
A recent political movement is pressing for the classification of a fetus as an "unborn child" eligible for government funding for prenatal care. Among the champions of this principle are President Bush and Health and Human Services head Tommy Thompson. If the notion becomes part of federal policy, states like Pennsylvania could choose to redefine fetuses as low-income children eligible for health-care funds under the Children's Health Insurance Program. Many pro-choice advocates are worrying hard that this campaign may create a new means of undermining Roe v. Wade.
NEWS
April 29, 1988 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Delaware Attorney General Charles M. Oberly 3d has proposed legislation that would make it a crime for anyone to kill a fetus - except for a doctor performing an abortion or the mother herself. The "feticide" legislation that Oberly sent to the Delaware legislature's Judicial Committee this week targets assailants, muggers, murderers and drunken drivers who - intentionally or not - cause the deaths of unborn children. "If your wife is eight months pregnant," Oberly said, "and somebody comes up and punches her in the stomach and doesn't injure her and kills the baby, that should be a crime.
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NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Could headline-grabbing scenarios like those in Texas and California involving brain-dead patients happen here? Yes, experts say. First, Texas: Marlise Munoz, 33, was found by her husband, Erick, at 2 a.m. Nov. 26 on their 2-year-old son's bedroom floor. Her heart had stopped for perhaps an hour after a pulmonary embolism. Her husband began CPR, called 911. She was 14 weeks pregnant. Her family stated from the beginning - only confirmed by the hospital last week - that Munoz was brain-dead.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Shawn Pogatchnik, Associated Press
DUBLIN, Ireland - A miscarrying woman who died in an Irish hospital should have had her blood poisoning detected much sooner and been offered an abortion to improve her odds of survival, an experts' report concluded Thursday in a case that is forcing Ireland to modernize its abortion laws. The 108-page report into the October death of Savita Halappanavar documented what the lead investigator described as "a cascade of mistakes" overshadowed by officials' refusal to remove the fetus until its heart stopped beating.
NEWS
June 13, 2013 | By Jim Abrams, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The House is girding for another wrenching debate on abortion after a House panel on Wednesday approved legislation that would ban almost all abortions after a fetus reaches the age of 20 weeks. Several recent court decisions have struck down similar state laws, and the GOP-backed bill has little future in the Democratic-led Senate, but the measure will give House conservatives a rare chance to reaffirm their social-issue credentials. The bill, named the "Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act," was approved by the House Judiciary Committee on a party-line 20-12 vote and could get a vote in the full House as early as next week.
NEWS
April 25, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The defense in the murder trial of West Philadelphia abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell began Tuesday with a limited victory for the 72-year-old physician: dismissal of three of seven counts on which he could have faced the death penalty. Common Pleas Court Judge Jeffrey P. Minehart did not state why he dismissed the three murder counts. The remaining four first-degree murder counts will go to the jury. A guilty verdict on any of them would result in the jury's deciding if Gosnell should be put to death or spend life in prison without parole.
NEWS
April 13, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the time, it must have seemed like the ultimate work-study program. Ashley Baldwin, a 15-year-old sophomore at University City High School who was thinking of becoming a doctor, got a job at one of the busiest clinics in West Philadelphia. She was paid, and in no time went from answering phones to doing ultrasounds, administering intravenous medicine, and, ultimately, assisting in abortions performed by her mentor, Kermit Gosnell. Now 22 and the mother of a 2-year-old son, Baldwin on Thursday told a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury hearing Gosnell's murder trial of her unusual hands-on medical apprenticeship.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trying to counter testimony that Kermit Gosnell's late-term abortions killed live babies, the abortion doctor's attorney argued Wednesday that moving, aborted fetuses were "already dead. " Jack McMahon pressed his defense theory to defuse Tuesday's gruesome testimony by ex-clinic worker Lynda Williams. Testifying under a plea agreement with prosecutors, Williams, 44, had told the Common Pleas Court jury of a time when she followed Gosnell's practice of "snipping" the spines of late-term fetuses born alive during abortions.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's one of the macabre mysteries in the case of Kermit Gosnell: Why did the West Philadelphia abortion doctor keep the severed feet of fetuses preserved in specimen jars? In testimony Tuesday, Adrienne Moton, a former worker at Gosnell's Women's Medical Society, told a Philadelphia jury that Gosnell once explained that he did so in case patients requested them for future identification or DNA samples. But an expert on fetal development, testifying Wednesday at Gosnell's abortion-murder trial, said that was news to him. "Do you think there is any medical reason to save the foot of a baby?"
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's one of the macabre mysteries in the case of Kermit Gosnell: Why did the West Philadelphia abortion doctor keep the severed feet of fetuses preserved in specimen jars? In testimony Tuesday, Adrienne Moton, a former worker at Gosnell's Women's Medical Society, told a Philadelphia jury that Gosnell once explained that he did so in case patients requested them for future identification or DNA samples. But an expert on fetal development, testifying Wednesday at Gosnell's abortion-murder trial, said that was news to him. "Do you think there is any medical reason to save the foot of a baby?"
NEWS
November 21, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The ability to find genetic problems before birth is undergoing a revolution that could expand prenatal testing while reducing the number of babies born with serious defects. But it is also increasing the ranks of expectant parents who are left in limbo, their joy turning to dread, because their offspring has a DNA variant that is not yet understood. "I started getting really panicky that the child I was carrying was going to be severely autistic with seizures and schizophrenia," said one such parent, interviewed for a University of Pennsylvania study of reactions to abnormal results.
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