CollectionsFiat
IN THE NEWS

Fiat

NEWS
June 18, 2000 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
Question: I have a question that's been bothering me. Some years back (20 or more), a friend bought a new car that had the spare tire mounted on top of the engine. I can't remember what make the car was. Can you set me straight? Answer: Fiat exported a subcompact sedan to this country in the '70s that had the spare mounted under the hood near the engine, but not right on top of it. Exposing the spare tire to all that engine heat wasn't a great idea, but then this wasn't a great car. As a matter of fact, it was an awful car. It resurfaced during the '80s with a different body and name - the Yugo - and bedeviled a whole new generation of drivers.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
The New Jersey Supreme Court should block Gov. Christie's latest attempt to roll back its landmark rulings on affordable housing. Christie provoked a standoff over the court's Mount Laurel decisions in 2011, when he attempted to unilaterally abolish the bipartisan board created to carry out the court's affordable-housing directives. Christie wants to transfer the functions of the Council on Affording Housing, which is independent of the governor, to the state Department of Community Affairs, which is run by a member of his cabinet.
NEWS
December 23, 1986
This is in reply to the Dec. 15 editorial "For doctors who really care. " The Action Alliance of Senior Citizens and your editorial are urging doctors to sign the Participating Physicians Agreement for Medicare. You equate participation by physicians with being a caring doctor. I feel deeply that I must take exception with this false presumption. You also imply that physicians don't sign because of financial reasons and you state that non-participating physicians can charge whatever they want.
NEWS
December 30, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
This has not been a good year for despots. North Korea's Kim Jong Il met his maker, Egypt's Hosni Mubarak is under arrest, and Syria's Bashar al-Assad faces a future that looks rocky. But in Philadelphia, City Council members get to rule their districts with an iron hand - at least for now. Philadelphia is one of a dwindling number of big American cities where local legislators adhere to a courtly tradition called councilmanic prerogative. Like its royal antecedent, the prerogative grants the city's 10 district Council members the right to do as they please in their own patch.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By Glenn Frankel, Washington Post
To make sense of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's claims that Kuwait is really part of Iraq, it helps to go back nearly 70 years to a meeting in a tent in the Arabian desert, where a British high commissioner arbitrarily drew what became the Kuwait-Iraq border. One night in November 1922, Sir Percy Cox, Britain's representative in Baghdad, summoned to his tent Sheik Ibn Saud, soon to become ruler of Saudi Arabia. Cox announced in sharp tones that, in view of an impasse on boundary disputes, he would decide the borders of Arab nations.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By George Parry
In the wake of the Orlando nightclub atrocity, President Obama has admonished us to "do some soul-searching" about how "easy" it is in this country to obtain firearms. Just so. But if we are to do an honest examination of conscience, we must begin with the facts. Omar Mateen, the Orlando jihadist, slaughtered his victims with a Sig Sauer MCX rifle, an AR-15-style rifle, and a Glock handgun. Contrary to mainstream media hysteria, neither is a machine gun, a category of weapon that has been illegal to purchase or possess since 1934.
NEWS
October 27, 1996 | By Robert Strauss, FOR THE INQUIRER
Since we were in the neighborhdd traveling through Italy, we thought we'd bop in on San Marino for lunch. San Marino is one of those cute little European countries that have managed to wangle their way through history as independent entities while the rest of the continent bumps and grinds through rough-and-tumble times. Along with Andorra, Monaco, Liechtenstein and Vatican City, San Marino relies on the good humor of the rest of the world to let it stay cute, little and independent.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | By John Moritz, Inquirer Staff Writer
Linda Spinelli had a wedding to attend. So on a Monday in November, she took her son's 2005 Jeep Grand Cherokee to the Spa Car Wash in Berwyn, where Spinelli was a regular customer. She sat in the lobby while a young worker climbed into the driver's seat. And as the Jeep exited the wash bay, Spinelli and other customers watched in horror. The Jeep suddenly lunged forward, she said, as the driver swerved to avoid pedestrians and slammed into large planters and four cars, including a Maserati.
NEWS
May 8, 1986 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Despite President Reagan's ban on U.S. business dealings with Libya, the Pentagon will be permitted to buy a fleet of new bulldozers built by a company partly owned by Moammar Khadafy's government. "An award to a wholly owned subsidiary of a foreign corporation that is 15 percent owned by the government of Libya will not violate the Libyan sanctions regulations severing all direct economic relations with that government," concluded the General Accounting Office, which routinely adjudicates government contracting disputes.
NEWS
June 19, 2016 | By Scott Sturgis, Staff Writer
Like most of the motoring public, I've been watching the Takata air bag recall unfolding slowly over the last several months. It crept into my world when the 2008 Toyota Matrix air bag was recalled. As the owner of a 2008 Pontiac Vibe - a twin of the Matrix - I was appalled at how long it took for the Vibe to then be included in the first 28.8 million vehicles. And when the big recall expansion came down last month - an additional 35 million to 40 million vehicles, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration - the Sturgis Family Sienna was now included in the mix. Two out of three is bad: That makes two-thirds of the Sturgis vehicles subject to the recall.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|