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Field Corn

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NEWS
July 7, 1988 | By Sonja Hillgren, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Even if drought destroys an unprecedented 40 percent of this year's corn crop, bins will be full enough to meet domestic and export demand until the 1989 harvest, the government's chief agricultural economist said yesterday. Before much of the Corn Belt became parched this summer, the Agriculture Department forecast that farmers would harvest 7.3 billion bushels of corn this fall. If dry weather cuts that to 4.4 billion bushels, which would be the sharpest drought reduction in history, the nation still would have 8.5 billion bushels to tide it over until the fall of 1989, according to Ewen Wilson, assistant agriculture secretary for economics.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Angelo Fichera, and Dara McBride, Inquirer Staff Writers
As Ed Gaventa looked out onto the sprawling field of sweet corn on his 200-acre farm in Logan Township, N.J., he said the crop was looking "pretty good" thanks to the overhead watering system he uses to make up for inadequate rainfall. But keeping his crops on track comes at a price. Gaventa, a fourth-generation farmer who co-owns six farmlands in South Jersey, estimated that a summer like this one - high heat and low rain - could cost him an extra $5,000 to keep his irrigation systems running.
NEWS
August 7, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele and Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The retired woman from Blue Bell was happily cutting hip-high zinnias at Maple Acres Farm here one day last week. For her, the chill, rainy spring that gut-punched farmers throughout the region has not been a bother. "I don't pick them in June," Carole Kates said. "July and August is what matters. " And the drenching spring? "It didn't affect me," Kates said. And to all appearances, it didn't affect the flowers. "You can see the plants are beautiful," she said.
NEWS
August 7, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele and Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
This spring's weather was the worst in the nearly 80-year memory of the family that says it farms more acres than any other in Bucks County. "Positively the worst I've seen. And [for] anybody I've talked to, worst they've seen," Bill Rook said in the shade of his family barn here one day last week. "We talked to Dad," Rook said, and "he never seen a year as bad as this. " J. Walter Rook is the father of Bob, 59, Bill, 55, and twins Barry and Ben, 53, who farm close to 3,000 acres in central Bucks.
NEWS
August 7, 2003 | By Suzette Parmley and Walter Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Farmer Phil Prickett of Lumberton is in a harvesting slump. His tomatoes were late. His wheat was diseased. It was too rainy to bale hay. And his cornstalks are miniature versions of those from past years. This is a year when little is going right for South Jersey farmers. "Everything is small," Prickett, 56, lamented last week while surveying his 350-acre farm. "The field corn is only 18 inches high, and should be about four feet. "Soybeans should be 18 to 20 inches.
NEWS
June 3, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forget simmering worries that the Phillies may have to wait till next year. There are more serious predictions threatening a joyous and bounteous summer. No locally grown sweet corn by the Fourth of July. Fewer local tomatoes for picnics on the Fourth. Fewer local strawberries for early June church festivals. Three fine traditions in danger of being washed out. Throughout Southeastern Pennsylvania and South Jersey, the damp, chilly May cast a pall over farmland that normally heaps roadside stands with the makings of wonderful summer meals.
NEWS
August 23, 2000 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Summer-long damp rotted some ground-hugging cantaloupes, cucumbers and watermelons. Overcast days kept bees from pollinating some pumpkin fields. Lack of sunshine delayed the ripening some of the season's first peppers and tomatoes. Some fields became so muddy that farmers could not get into them to harvest hay or vegetables. But the rains that made umbrellas our companions have done wonders for the field corn that feeds cattle and the sweet corn that graces summer evening dinner tables.
NEWS
May 20, 1990 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1988, Philadelphia regional farmers saw crops parched to death. In 1989, they saw crops drenched to death. In 1990, they see flourishing fields. Fields of dreams. So far. After the drought of 1988, after the heavy rains of 1989, the relatively mild weather of 1990 has blessed much of the farmland of Southeastern Pennsylvania and South Jersey. That matters because agriculture is the leading industry in Pennsylvania and one of the leading in New Jersey.
NEWS
September 11, 1993 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The high heat of this suffering summer has dampened shirts, dried up tempers . . . and hit some farmers in this region right between the eyes. In the fields of Southeastern Pennsylvania and southern New Jersey, this is the season-end picture: Grain crops that feed dairy cows and beef cattle were good, not great. Vegetables wilted and withered. Fruits flourished. Hey, peaches flourished so much, one Camden County grower intends to start cutting down his peach trees.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steve Reinford was carrying the black-and-white calf across the muddy barnyard pasture, where it had been born two hours before. "Can't get them any fresher than this," he said with a grin. Dairy cows are the backbone of Reinford's farm in northern Montgomery County, the spine of the state's agricultural industry. The corn that feeds them is a principal crop on Reinford's spread, the leading crop across the state. And this year - after a drought-plagued 1988 and a rain-plagued 1989 - the farms and fields of grain in the Pennsylvania suburbs of Philadelphia seem to be returning to health.
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BUSINESS
August 16, 2012 | By Harold Brubaker and Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writers
Southwest Philadelphia resident Mona West has a simple strategy for combatting rising food prices. "I buy less," she said. West's friend Gail Glenn of Pine Hill, N.J., has a different approach: "Just stomach it. You have to eat. " The two reacted this week to the prospect of higher food prices next year because of the severe drought searing the Midwest grain belt. The forecast for this year's harvest of U.S. field corn - not the sort bought at farm stands to eat off the cob - is down 27 percent from earlier this season because of weather that has scorched more of the nation's farmland than any other drought in the last 50 years, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Angelo Fichera, and Dara McBride, Inquirer Staff Writers
As Ed Gaventa looked out onto the sprawling field of sweet corn on his 200-acre farm in Logan Township, N.J., he said the crop was looking "pretty good" thanks to the overhead watering system he uses to make up for inadequate rainfall. But keeping his crops on track comes at a price. Gaventa, a fourth-generation farmer who co-owns six farmlands in South Jersey, estimated that a summer like this one - high heat and low rain - could cost him an extra $5,000 to keep his irrigation systems running.
NEWS
August 7, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele and Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The retired woman from Blue Bell was happily cutting hip-high zinnias at Maple Acres Farm here one day last week. For her, the chill, rainy spring that gut-punched farmers throughout the region has not been a bother. "I don't pick them in June," Carole Kates said. "July and August is what matters. " And the drenching spring? "It didn't affect me," Kates said. And to all appearances, it didn't affect the flowers. "You can see the plants are beautiful," she said.
NEWS
August 7, 2003 | By Suzette Parmley and Walter Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Farmer Phil Prickett of Lumberton is in a harvesting slump. His tomatoes were late. His wheat was diseased. It was too rainy to bale hay. And his cornstalks are miniature versions of those from past years. This is a year when little is going right for South Jersey farmers. "Everything is small," Prickett, 56, lamented last week while surveying his 350-acre farm. "The field corn is only 18 inches high, and should be about four feet. "Soybeans should be 18 to 20 inches.
NEWS
August 7, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele and Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
This spring's weather was the worst in the nearly 80-year memory of the family that says it farms more acres than any other in Bucks County. "Positively the worst I've seen. And [for] anybody I've talked to, worst they've seen," Bill Rook said in the shade of his family barn here one day last week. "We talked to Dad," Rook said, and "he never seen a year as bad as this. " J. Walter Rook is the father of Bob, 59, Bill, 55, and twins Barry and Ben, 53, who farm close to 3,000 acres in central Bucks.
NEWS
June 3, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forget simmering worries that the Phillies may have to wait till next year. There are more serious predictions threatening a joyous and bounteous summer. No locally grown sweet corn by the Fourth of July. Fewer local tomatoes for picnics on the Fourth. Fewer local strawberries for early June church festivals. Three fine traditions in danger of being washed out. Throughout Southeastern Pennsylvania and South Jersey, the damp, chilly May cast a pall over farmland that normally heaps roadside stands with the makings of wonderful summer meals.
NEWS
August 23, 2000 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Summer-long damp rotted some ground-hugging cantaloupes, cucumbers and watermelons. Overcast days kept bees from pollinating some pumpkin fields. Lack of sunshine delayed the ripening some of the season's first peppers and tomatoes. Some fields became so muddy that farmers could not get into them to harvest hay or vegetables. But the rains that made umbrellas our companions have done wonders for the field corn that feeds cattle and the sweet corn that graces summer evening dinner tables.
NEWS
September 7, 1998 | By Lisa Shafer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After escaping the labyrinth of crowds in their hometowns this Labor Day weekend, at least two Jersey Shore families found themselves sandal-to-sandal in a Bucks County cornfield yesterday afternoon. In a six-acre maze carved from browning stalks at Shady Brook Farm, Sooz Jackson and her son, Dylan, 9, of Absecon, had twisted their way into a cornrow occupied by Tim Becker and his daughter, Logan, 8, of Waretown. Both families were lost. "They all went down there, and we all came up here," said Becker with a laugh when he realized that rather than stumbling upon some locals, he had run into other Shore dwellers at the aMAIZEing Corn Maze Festival.
NEWS
September 11, 1993 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The high heat of this suffering summer has dampened shirts, dried up tempers . . . and hit some farmers in this region right between the eyes. In the fields of Southeastern Pennsylvania and southern New Jersey, this is the season-end picture: Grain crops that feed dairy cows and beef cattle were good, not great. Vegetables wilted and withered. Fruits flourished. Hey, peaches flourished so much, one Camden County grower intends to start cutting down his peach trees.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steve Reinford was carrying the black-and-white calf across the muddy barnyard pasture, where it had been born two hours before. "Can't get them any fresher than this," he said with a grin. Dairy cows are the backbone of Reinford's farm in northern Montgomery County, the spine of the state's agricultural industry. The corn that feeds them is a principal crop on Reinford's spread, the leading crop across the state. And this year - after a drought-plagued 1988 and a rain-plagued 1989 - the farms and fields of grain in the Pennsylvania suburbs of Philadelphia seem to be returning to health.
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