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Field Trips

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NEWS
October 18, 1987 | By David Raudenbush, Special to The Inquirer
The Paulsboro Board of Education on Tuesday night said school officials had not provided enough information about seven planned field trips for the school year and denied approval until more information could be received. Board members said the dates, exact locations and cost were missing in some cases. The trips had all been proposed for the Paulsboro High School. Approximately 40 trips for the two elementary schools and the high school were presented to the board for approval.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | By Lisa Schwartz, Special to The Inquirer
Michael Rakoski is frustrated because his daughter, who plays in the Voorhees Middle School band, can't travel to band competitions while other middle school students can travel to soccer games. Delores Petru, who also has a daughter in the band, is concerned that the school board is sending a message to students that music and the arts aren't as important as sports. Last year, when state spending restrictions forced the district to slice more than $1 million from its 1991-92 budget, the resulting cuts included about $60,000 worth of field trips.
NEWS
May 11, 1986 | By Deborah Russell-Brown, Special to The Inquirer
The Mantua Township Board of Education has drafted a statement that would ban recreational field trips, such as visits to amusement parks, for students in the township's three elementary schools. The policy was formulated last week at a workshop meeting of the board and is to be voted on during the regular board meeting tomorrow night. According to school officials, the memory of such incidents as the 1984 fire at Six Flags Great Adventure amusement park prompted them to consider issuing the statement.
NEWS
March 27, 1986 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Radnor Township school board has approved a program that will permit middle school students to spend one day a week on field trips to study the Brandywine River and its history, culture and geographical significance. The program will begin in September 1987 and will continue for the school year on a trial basis, with 40 students selected randomly from the seventh grade. Although the cost to the district was not mentioned, superintendent John C. Crosby said, "It would be a break-even proposition.
NEWS
July 22, 1990 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
Several youngsters huddled excitedly in the cab of a shiny pumper to catch every word of the volunteer firefighter talking about the truck's equipment. It would have been an enjoyable, educational experience for any child. But the teenagers in this group faced a greater challenge than most kids their age. Each of the 30 students in the summer school class that recently visited the Yardley-Makefield Fire Company headquarters is a native speaker of Korean, Spanish or some other foreign language.
NEWS
March 26, 2003 | By Marc Schogol, Kellie Patrick and Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Pennsbury High School Chamber Choir will not be going to Ireland. Seniors at Council Rock North and South Highs will not be going to Orlando. Neshaminy schools students will not be going outside Bucks County for the next 30 days. In a number of school districts in the region and throughout the country, heightened security concerns because of the war with Iraq have prompted officials to cancel or restrict field trips - the climax of the academic year for many students or, in the case of senior trips, a time-honored rite of passage.
NEWS
November 8, 1992 | By Maura Webber, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Students will get some breaks from the daily grind despite Washington Township budget cuts last spring, which erased field trips from the school district's 1992-93 schedule. The school board has decided to restore $42,816 to the district's budget to allow field trips for grades six through 12. The money came from an unexpectedly large surplus from last year, Board Secretary Robert Kern said. But while the news may delight students and teachers, some school board members expressed frustration about the policy turnaround.
NEWS
October 16, 1988 | By Neal Thompson, Special to The Inquirer
The Burlington County Natural Science Club is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year by initiating a "revitalization program" to renew interest in the club. Members are encouraging public attendance at their monthly meetings and mini-programs, where a variety of topics are discussed. The meetings include slide presentations and lectures, often by authors or naturalists. The club meets on the second Wednesday of each month at 7:45 p.m. at Oaks Hall, Cabin Circle Drive in Medford Lakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1992 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
A grunting, chicken-cackling saxophone player; a monologist with a hundred voices; a spidery-thin dancer with red fingers; and a film about spinning - this is not a vaudeville show that MTI Tabernacle Theater is presenting through Sunday. The people in the program fall under the intentionally hazy rubric of performance art, and they all have found a steady outlet for their unique talents at an experimental theater in New York called P.S. 122. The show at MTI, called P.S. 122 Field Trips, offers a representative sampling of some of the big names on the fringe.
NEWS
December 1, 1990 | By Ed Finkel, Special to The Inquirer
Have planets, will travel. Indian artifacts, tools, trinkets - they travel, too, carried by the band of naturalists roving the region to bring youngsters in touch with their surroundings. Normally, schools send students on fields trips to parks or museums or planetariums. The Roving Nature Center, a group of self-styled free-lance naturalists from Northampton County, bring the field trips to the schools. They were at the Cole Manor Elementary School in East Norriton Township, Montgomery County, this week teaching fourth and fifth graders about the galaxy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2015 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
  John Sims, James Kawano and Carmen Coll gather around the Direct Energy ad at the Narberth SEPTA station. "Fixed rate? Hmmm. Sounds great," Coll, who lives in New York City, reads aloud, cheerfully stretching out the "e" in great with that je ne sais quoi lilt only a Frenchwoman can carry off. "Sign me up!" A few minutes earlier, Sims of Claymont, Del., spoke the same copy in a resonating voice of authority. When Kawano, of Narberth, gave it a go, he sounded like that nice, helpful guy next door.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like most people with big weekend plans, David La Puma was watching the weather forecast. It looked perfect: a cold front, followed by northwest winds. Perfect for the birds, that is, and the humans who watch them. Both flocked to Cape May for New Jersey Audubon's fall festival, an annual event that began 68 years ago amid post-World War II ebullience, and that contributes a bundle to the local economy. This year's outing began Friday and ended Sunday. Several thousand birders - often with binoculars plastered firmly to their faces - attended the three-day event, which included field trips, lectures, demonstrations, and an exhibit hall full of the best binoculars and scopes money can buy. On what had to be some of the most glorious days of the fall, people scoped southbound seabirds that soared over the ocean off Avalon Point, where counters log nearly a million birds every fall.
NEWS
May 14, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Myrtle Daniels stepped up to the altar and switched on a reading light. Lucile Stewart-Mitchell took her seat at the piano, pressing open a hymn book. Karyn Fisher turned down music playing on an iPad. "We've had a busy week," Daniels announced, facing a dozen congregants gathered Sunday morning at Mount Zion A.M.E. in Woolwich Township. A week earlier, someone had rearranged the letters on the sign outside the tiny church, defacing it with a racist - and misspelled - message: No Nigers Welcome.
NEWS
April 14, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The girls on the crowded stage at the Boys & Girls Club of Camden County looked tense and frustrated as they tried to replicate the complicated dance moves members of the Camden Sophisticated Sisters drill team were demonstrating. About a hundred girls aged 3 to 18 had come Saturday to audition for the team, which has been featured on CNN and NBC as a bright spot in a troubled city. Tawanda "Wa-Wa" Jones, who founded the team 26 years ago, hadn't let the prospective members in on a little secret: Almost all of them would get in. "This is not about the trophies...," Jones said as she supervised from below the stage.
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAPE MAY - The New Jersey Audubon Society, which for 115 years has exhorted nature-seekers to interact with the physical world, is expanding its virtual horizons in a budgetary move officials say is born of Darwinian necessity. "To survive, we need to adapt," said Eric Stiles, president of the nonprofit nature and conservation group, which has no connection with the National Audubon Society. Effective Jan. 1, the organization will close two facilities - including the 135-acre Rancocas Nature Center in Mount Holly - and modify programming at nine others.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank Rubio led about two dozen students from Rowan University's Camden campus down to the waterfront's historic Victor building, converted a few years ago into trendy apartments. But the writing-arts professor wasn't trying to help anyone in his class find a one-bedroom unit with high ceilings and a romantic river view. He was trying to help them find something that, for most of them, was more elusive: The right words. In English. "Why did you choose dog?" asked Saudi Arabian-born Muath Rashed, 19, of Glassboro.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 6-year-old Camden boy was stabbed to death early Sunday and his 12-year-old sister was seriously injured during an attack in their home, neighbors and police said. Dominick Andujor died in the house in the 900 block of Ware Street, authorities said. His sister, Amber, had run bleeding to a neighbor's house before being taken to Cooper University Hospital, neighbors said. Camden County Prosecutor Warren Faulk and Camden Police Chief Scott Thomson issued a joint statement announcing the 2 a.m. double stabbing.
NEWS
July 5, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
A request by LEAP Academy University Charter Schools to expand enrollment at a planned campus in Camden's Cramer Hill neighborhood has hit a bump after findings by the state Department of Education that the charter mismanaged thousands of dollars in federal funds. According to a state audit report issued May 21, LEAP owed the Education Department $136,368 for payments it received for non-allowable expenses during the 2009-10 school year. A check for the full amount was mailed to the state on Tuesday, said Gloria Bonilla-Santiago, LEAP's founder and chairwoman.
FOOD
March 15, 2012 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter McAndrews, arguably Philadelphia's Sandwich King, is doing something sacrilegious by sandwich standards: At Paesano's, his fantastic Philadelphia shops, he is serving select sandwiches on gluten-free bread. Seriously. The same bread that is more often compared to hockey pucks than haute cuisine. But McAndrews isn't making concessions. He's using the fresh-baked products from Toté Bakery, a gluten-free bread bakery - a rarity in the region - which opened in the Italian Market a few months ago. "Gluten-free stuff is always horrible," says McAndrews, whose customers often request the alternative bread because they suffer from celiac disease (like his sons)
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