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Field Trips

NEWS
March 7, 2004 | By Kellie Patrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the North Penn School District alone, members of 22 parent groups work to persuade neighbors and coworkers to buy wrapping paper, handmade crafts and frozen chicken. They're quite persuasive. Last year, those groups funneled $500,000 into school and extracurricular programs for the district's 13,000 students. But the North Penn parents face fierce competition - and not just from each other. Nationally and across the region, at public schools as well as private, parents are fund-raising more than ever.
NEWS
August 28, 2008 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Camden School District has agreed to settle a lawsuit with 14 parents who said they were swindled by a former elementary school principal who charged their children for field trips the district had paid for. The ex-principal, Michael Hailey, faces trial in November on charges related to the field trips and another alleged scheme. The district agreed to pay $25,000 to settle the parents' lawsuit, filed in 2006. The settlement includes attorney fees and court costs. The school board did not disclose how much would go to the parents, whose children attended Hailey's school, H.B. Wilson Elementary.
NEWS
May 16, 2003 | By Terry Bitman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forty programs - including field trips, middle school basketball, and late bus runs - have been slashed or removed from the Washington Township school budget to comply with $1.5 million in cuts ordered by the Township Council. "It is unfortunate; we did not want to reduce or eliminate any of these programs or services," school district spokeswoman Alice Coghill said yesterday. "But when you've faced as many defeated budgets as we have . . . you get to the point where it is hard to be creative.
NEWS
May 15, 2000 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Elementary and middle school teachers looking for new ways to excite students about science and places to explore on field trips may have found both, and more, at Teachers' Night. Forty exhibitors, including representatives from NASA, the Pennsylvania National Guard, the Smithsonian Institution and the Philadelphia Zoo, provided free teaching guides, posters and interactive CDs to about 200 public, private and parochial teachers from Delaware, Chester and Montgomery Counties. Held at Pennsylvania State University's Delaware County campus, the recent event offered a variety of resource information in one location, said Kelly Daniel, spokeswoman for Rep. Curt Weldon (R., Pa.)
NEWS
August 21, 2000 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
An innovative program to incorporate music, theater and art into the students' academic courses will begin this fall at Conwell-Egan Catholic High School in Fairless Hills. The high school received a $110,000 academic enrichment grant from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the Connelly Foundation to establish the humanities program. In addition, Conwell-Egan raised more than $21,000 toward the pilot program. "The humanities affect and reflect how we see our lives," said Margaret Blanco, chairwoman of the English department.
NEWS
May 14, 1997 | By Michelle Crouch, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Township Committee eliminated school field trips, reduced the number of new staff members, and cut the number of new computers in the Voorhees school budget this week, but average residents still will pay about $166 more in school taxes than they did last year. The extra taxes are needed to maintain the quality of education as enrollment increases, school officials and the committee agreed. Officials expect at least 115 new students this fall and an additional 500 by 2001. At Monday night's meeting, the committee said it felt obligated to make some cuts after voters defeated the budget, for the first time in 20 years, on April 15. "We're not cutting teachers, we're not cutting staff, and we're not cutting programming," Mayor Gary Finger said.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / BARBARA JOHNSTON
AFTER HIS PERFORMANCE in a talent show, Mickey McDonald, 6, gets a congratulatory hug from volunteer Raina Goldberg at Camp Dumore in Lima. Mickey attended the six-week day camp sponsored by Easter Seals for young people ages 5 to 21 who are mentally retarded, physically disabled or learning disabled. Activities included swimming, arts and crafts, and field trips. The camp concluded last week.
NEWS
June 16, 2004
Affordable field trips for students are available Thanks to Lini S. Kadaba for bringing to light the reality that many schools cannot afford field trips to local attractions and therefore take advantage of free trips to various stores ("Instead of zoo, it's off to Petco for field trips," May 25). Teachers do have options when it comes to accessible local outings for their students. Along with the many free offerings available in the Independence Park area, the National Liberty Museum offers free and low-cost tours for children and young adults.
NEWS
March 15, 2000 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
The cost of private day and sleep-over camps may be prohibitive for some, but there are plenty of free and low-cost options. Here are some of them: Congreso de Latinos Unidos 719 W. Girard Ave. 215-229-4040 Free six-week summer programs for first- through eighth-graders includes academic enrichment, arts education, recreation and field trips. Starts in late June at Fairhill, Taylor and Elkins elementary schools and Julia de Burgos and Jones middle schools. Hours are 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday through Friday.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1990 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / BONNIE WELLER
Summer's here and school is not. What's a working parent to do with those youngsters who complain about having nothing to do? If the parent works for Campbell Soup Co. and if the children are in first, second or third grade, the answer may be: Send the children to company-sponsored summer camp. For a fee of $65 per week, Campbell employees can send their children to nine weeks of day camp. The 23 elementary students attending the camp go swimming at the Camden YMCA three days a week and go on field trips to places such as Betsy Ross' house and a blueberry farm.
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