CollectionsField Trips
IN THE NEWS

Field Trips

NEWS
June 20, 2004 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A brief trip to Cape May in 1994 sold Elsie Mueller on traveling with Elderhostel, the nation's first and largest educational and travel organization for older adults. Mueller, a widow living in Lansdowne, Delaware County, found that a six-day stay at the Marquis de Lafayette Hotel in Cape May cost far less than if she had made her own arrangements. Plus it included a number of cultural side trips. And pleasant company. "I was surprised to find that people on the trip enjoyed the same things I did, including museums and a bird sanctuary," the 76-year-old recounted.
NEWS
June 16, 2004
Affordable field trips for students are available Thanks to Lini S. Kadaba for bringing to light the reality that many schools cannot afford field trips to local attractions and therefore take advantage of free trips to various stores ("Instead of zoo, it's off to Petco for field trips," May 25). Teachers do have options when it comes to accessible local outings for their students. Along with the many free offerings available in the Independence Park area, the National Liberty Museum offers free and low-cost tours for children and young adults.
NEWS
May 27, 2004
In a world of a million childhood distractions - television, music, sports, instant messaging - school remains largely an "uncluttered environment," as marketers put it. Those marketers would love to change that. They're eager to bombard that huge, captive, impressionable audience with the seductions of consumerism. First came Channel One, with its ad-laden newscasts; then computer deals, exclusive soda contracts and naming rights for gyms. Now schools are selling out their field trips, too. Instead of rubber snakes from a zoo gift shop, this year's field trip souvenir may be a free Sports Authority lunch box or a rub-on Petco tattoo.
NEWS
May 25, 2004 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rutgers University has a new course, but you have to be a professor to take it. Called Garden State 101, it is a five-day, 540-mile field-trip meant to immerse relatively new instructors in all things New Jersey - or as much as can be covered in that time. The traveling seminar hit the road yesterday, starting at university president Richard McCormick's home in Piscataway, N.J., and stopping in Trenton, Camden and Cherry Hill before heading to Vineland to spend the night. And you might be happy to know that on field trips, even professors get the fourth-grade treatment of a head count when they board the bus. "The goal here is to connect the university to the state, emulating a little bit of that Midwestern tradition where the 'U' is a more central institution in the state than Rutgers currently is in New Jersey," McCormick said.
NEWS
May 25, 2004 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Snaking past soccer cleats and hockey sticks, the kindergartners pause at the gleaming basketball hoops. The would-be Allen Iversons heave free throws at the $49.99 plastered on one backboard. As shots go wild, Wally David delivers the day's message: "And if you exercise, what do you get?" "Strong! Healthy!" the children cheer. The 44 students from Loesche Elementary School in Northeast Philadelphia are chasing hoop dreams far from gym class or the Y. Instead, they are taking a field trip on a Tuesday morning - touring the Sports Authority's merchandise-laden aisles with its operations manager in nearby Langhorne.
NEWS
March 7, 2004 | By Kellie Patrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the North Penn School District alone, members of 22 parent groups work to persuade neighbors and coworkers to buy wrapping paper, handmade crafts and frozen chicken. They're quite persuasive. Last year, those groups funneled $500,000 into school and extracurricular programs for the district's 13,000 students. But the North Penn parents face fierce competition - and not just from each other. Nationally and across the region, at public schools as well as private, parents are fund-raising more than ever.
NEWS
December 14, 2003 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
With a sweep of his arm, Richard Newman directed attention to the framed photographs mounted on the brick walls of the Triumph Brewing Co. "People look at these and say, 'I can do that.' Then, they take a picture, and it's just a snapshot. They think it's in the equipment, and they buy expensive equipment," said the founder of the Newtown Camera Club, shaking his head. "It takes a while to train one's eye and mind to accomplish these things. " Sitting at a table with club president Mort Metersky, Newman wrote in a single column on lined, yellow paper the words composition, technique, impact, imagination, creativity.
NEWS
September 14, 2003 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In a shrinking world where virtual experience is replacing the life of the senses, it is still possible to find meaning in nature. So say the students in Wyncote Academy's outdoor education program when they talk about the field trips they have taken in the last few years. Together, these students in grades 9 through 12 have stood near Great Plains buffalo and marveled at their enormous size; hiked through old-growth forests and craned their necks upward, still not seeing the tops of the mammoth trees; and trudged through more snow in the mountains than they have ever seen before.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|