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Field Work

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NEWS
October 21, 1999 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stream research can be problematic. No sooner does a researcher set up probes in a waterway than a flood comes along and washes them away, along with the substance being studied. The Stroud Water Research Center, recognized as the premier waterway research facility in the nation, has brought the field work inside. A creek now runs through a new $600,000 greenhouse research facility - dubbed a streamhouse. Center director Bernard Sweeney and environmental lawyer Robert F. Kennedy Jr. christened it yesterday not with the traditional champagne, but with a dousing of water from the White Clay Creek.
NEWS
January 12, 1996 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
To Little League president John Jones, the borough's Republican leader, Cornelius "Con" Cassidy, is a civic-minded man who is "genuinely concerned about kids" here. "He's bent over backward for the Little League, and he's also helped out other groups in the borough in the past," Jones said last week. To Paula M. Brown, a Democrat and former Borough Council member, Cassidy is a loose cannon, a party honcho who uses his political influence to play by his own rules. "He makes entirely too many decisions for the borough, even though he's not an elected official," she said.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ward H. Goodenough, 94, a longtime University of Pennsylvania professor whose work helped shape anthropology, died Sunday, June 9, of organ failure at the Quadrangle in Haverford. "Transcending the triteness of the terms, he was a true renaissance man and a consummate gentleman," his family said in a statement. Along with his academic work, Dr. Goodenough composed music and wrote poetry. Born in Cambridge, Mass., he lived in England and Germany as a child while his father studied at the University of Oxford.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Camden leaders tout a budding renaissance in the city, one Rutgers-Camden project will be keeping an objective eye by tracking neighborhood changes in the Cramer Hill section. The Camden Neighborhood Change Study, nearing completion of its initial data-collection phase, will create a database of every property in Cramer Hill, along with a variety of indicators of condition: broken windows, graffiti, vacancy status. Once complete, an online map will allow anyone to explore the baseline information.
NEWS
September 17, 2010
PHILLYCLOUT confession time: We were a bit doubtful that Sam Katz would really run a fourth campaign for mayor, this time as a Democrat, when we first wrote about it in May. We figured Katz enjoyed that people were asking him to consider it. And it couldn't hurt that the buzz was coming just as Katz was looking for funding to complete a documentary series on the history of Philadelphia. But now we think there could be much more to this, in part because Katz may be reaching out to the very people who helped former Mayor John Street defeat him in their 2003 rematch.
NEWS
September 22, 1986 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 22-year-old female graduate student who was doing field work in Blackbird State Forest in New Castle County, Del., was found shot to death in the forest Saturday, New Castle County police said yesterday. Police said the body of Jane Marie Prichard, a University of Maryland student from Clarksburg, Md., was discovered by a Perth Amboy, N.J., couple who had been walking in the woods, police said. According to police, Prichard had parked her 1984 Chevrolet Blazer off county Route 471 early Saturday and set up her field equipment to study leaf and plant growth in the area.
NEWS
May 14, 1998 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On some farms in the Philadelphia region, strawberries are rotting, greens are too muddy to harvest, and hay is sitting uncut. Farmers and farm consultants differ on crop quality and the effect on farm incomes, but they see no supermarket price increases from the 12 days of rainfall that ended Tuesday. For some farmers, the rain has produced nothing but frustration. "We're not used to just sitting around waiting," Suzanne Hallowell said yesterday from her home near Gilbertsville.
NEWS
December 25, 2009 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Archaeologists working at the SugarHouse casino site between Fishtown and Northern Liberties have concluded their field work without finding any trace of a Revolutionary-era British fort, a casino spokeswoman said yesterday. But the abundance of Native American relics unearthed during the dig, some dating back 3,000 years, has drawn the interest of a New Jersey band of the Leni-Lenape Indians. Casino spokeswoman Leigh Whitaker said archaeologists from A.D. Marble & Co. of Conshohocken found "thousands of artifacts," ranging from Indian artifacts to fragments of pottery.
NEWS
November 3, 1997 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU Inquirer staff writer James M. O'Neill contributed to this article
It was a gray, rain-soaked Sunday morning in suburbia. Shawn Bonawitz stepped over a pile of soggy leaves toward the house, holding Republican leaflets in one hand and take-out coffee in the other. "Is this the one?" he asked the driver of a car idling in the street. The answer came back: No, it's the home of a registered Democrat, not worth the effort. Bonawitz changed course toward the next house. "Would I be here if it wasn't for a friend of mine? Probably not," said Bonawitz, 26. "But . . . I wouldn't be doing it if I didn't like what was going on with the Republican Party.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dell Hathaway Hymes, 82, a linguist, an anthropologist, and a folklorist who was dean of the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania for 12 years, died of complications of Alzheimer's disease Nov. 13 at the Cedars Nursing Home in Charlottesville, Va. Dr. Hymes joined Penn as a professor of anthropology in 1965. He was appointed dean in 1975. He left in 1987 to became a professor of anthropology and English at the University of Virginia. At Penn, Dr. Hymes launched the educational linguistics program in the graduate school.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Camden leaders tout a budding renaissance in the city, one Rutgers-Camden project will be keeping an objective eye by tracking neighborhood changes in the Cramer Hill section. The Camden Neighborhood Change Study, nearing completion of its initial data-collection phase, will create a database of every property in Cramer Hill, along with a variety of indicators of condition: broken windows, graffiti, vacancy status. Once complete, an online map will allow anyone to explore the baseline information.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ward H. Goodenough, 94, a longtime University of Pennsylvania professor whose work helped shape anthropology, died Sunday, June 9, of organ failure at the Quadrangle in Haverford. "Transcending the triteness of the terms, he was a true renaissance man and a consummate gentleman," his family said in a statement. Along with his academic work, Dr. Goodenough composed music and wrote poetry. Born in Cambridge, Mass., he lived in England and Germany as a child while his father studied at the University of Oxford.
NEWS
May 15, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The empty chip bags, a comb, and a pacifier that littered the shoddy grass of the Camden High School football field Monday will be gone in coming weeks - scooped up by a bulldozer. A year-and-a-half after receiving a $200,000 NFL Grassroots Grant for new synthetic turf, the Camden High School Athletic Field Ad Hoc Committee has gathered enough money to start working on a new field, including a $250,000 grant from the U.S. Soccer Foundation. Shovels went into the ground Monday in a ceremonial start to the renovation.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a panel discussion Wednesday, several of Montgomery County's high-achieving women stressed the need to support one another and to build confidence to compete in the workplace. More than 100 people attended the event, hosted by the Montgomery County Commission on Women & Families, to hear local scientists and engineers discuss their experiences in a male-dominated field. There were, of course, the familiar anecdotes about being called "sweetie," or being treated as a secretary instead of a manager.
NEWS
September 17, 2010
PHILLYCLOUT confession time: We were a bit doubtful that Sam Katz would really run a fourth campaign for mayor, this time as a Democrat, when we first wrote about it in May. We figured Katz enjoyed that people were asking him to consider it. And it couldn't hurt that the buzz was coming just as Katz was looking for funding to complete a documentary series on the history of Philadelphia. But now we think there could be much more to this, in part because Katz may be reaching out to the very people who helped former Mayor John Street defeat him in their 2003 rematch.
NEWS
December 25, 2009 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Archaeologists working at the SugarHouse casino site between Fishtown and Northern Liberties have concluded their field work without finding any trace of a Revolutionary-era British fort, a casino spokeswoman said yesterday. But the abundance of Native American relics unearthed during the dig, some dating back 3,000 years, has drawn the interest of a New Jersey band of the Leni-Lenape Indians. Casino spokeswoman Leigh Whitaker said archaeologists from A.D. Marble & Co. of Conshohocken found "thousands of artifacts," ranging from Indian artifacts to fragments of pottery.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dell Hathaway Hymes, 82, a linguist, an anthropologist, and a folklorist who was dean of the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania for 12 years, died of complications of Alzheimer's disease Nov. 13 at the Cedars Nursing Home in Charlottesville, Va. Dr. Hymes joined Penn as a professor of anthropology in 1965. He was appointed dean in 1975. He left in 1987 to became a professor of anthropology and English at the University of Virginia. At Penn, Dr. Hymes launched the educational linguistics program in the graduate school.
NEWS
October 14, 2004 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City and state officials are looking into complaints by subcontractors who contend they have not been paid for their work at Lincoln Financial Field, which opened last year. Subcontractors who did everything from paving the football stadium's parking lot to building the luxury suites contend they are collectively owed $20 million to $30 million for their work, more than a year after the $380 million stadium opened. Dozens of companies say they are affected. Today, Philadelphia City Councilman Richard Mariano (D., Seventh District)
SPORTS
March 17, 2003 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Performing its annual exercise that generates teeth-gnashing, disappointment, grumbling and controversy, the NCAA selection committee stuck the names of 65 teams in brackets yesterday for the start of a 2003 Division I men's basketball tournament that figures to be wild and unpredictable. Everyone seemed to agree on two of the No. 1 seeds - Kentucky in the Midwest and Arizona in the West - because they were the top two teams in college basketball this season. But even that outraged purists who noted that the committee put them both on the same side of the bracket, meaning they might meet in the national semifinals, not in a highly charged championship game.
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was just about this time last year when high heat and lack of rain began what Pennsylvania officials called the worst agricultural disaster in the state's history. It's a bit different this June. "We thought that, with all the rain, we wouldn't have any problems this year," Nelson Beam said at his home south of Elverson, looking out on a crop of winter barley too damp to harvest. Instead of heat-scorched and rain-parched fields, he said, "we're all fighting the mud and the slugs.
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