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Figurines

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NEWS
July 8, 1989 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three days of sales will offer collectors Hummel figurines, Mickey Mouse figures and many of the worldly possessions of a Montgomery County "outdoors man. " The man is Chuck Berry, who has sold his farm near Elverson and who, according to auctioneer Ken Reed, is "with much reluctance" allowing the liquidation of the farm's furnishings at a sale beginning at 10 a.m. today. Among the sporting items to be sold are several firearms, including a Belgian-made Browning superposed 12-gauge lightning-trap shotgun and a 760 carbine 306 pump.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | By Kathryn Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
In a year when businesses are firing employees in droves, there is no such talk at Byers' Choice Ltd., a company in Colmar that creates holiday Caroler figurines. "We don't lay anyone off," even after the company's workload slows in January and February, said co-owner and president Bob Byers. In a grim yule season in which both shoppers and companies have worked to keep costs down, Bob and Joyce Byers have handed out hefty Christmas bonuses, paid their workers to take off the week after Christmas, and awarded $1,000 scholarships to each of their employees' college-bound children.
LIVING
August 28, 2009 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
William H. Bunch Auctions and Appraisals' two-session pre-Labor Day sale will open Monday in Chadds Ford with a catalog auction of modern collectibles, featuring 120 lots of Royal Doulton figurines. Royal Doultons are not exactly modern, having been made since the early 1800s near London. But they are still being produced, retain their popularity and are comparatively inexpensive, in part because most are open stock, as opposed to the limited-edition status of other collectible porcelain figurines, such as Hummels.
SPORTS
February 3, 1994 | by Steve Weiser, Special to the Daily News
I got into an interesting discussion with one of my customers last week. We were looking at the new, improved Sports Impressions figurines, and they are every bit as nice as those produced by both Gartlan and Salvino. We were wondering how many of the Wayne Gretzky and Magic Johnson figurines were bought by collectors in the Los Angeles area. I remember how well the Mike Schmidt Gartlan sold for me. We estimated that 50 percent of the Gretzky and Johnson pieces might reside in the LA area.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Question: I have 6 1/2-inch-high bisque figurines, marked "II" and "2642" on their bases, that belonged to my grandmother. What can you tell me about them? Answer: Bisque, meaning unglazed porcelain, was a popular material for figurines at the turn of the century. Your pair may have been made by the Amphora factory in the Turn-Teplitz area of Bohemia. In perfect condition the pair would retail for $500, according to Marvin Baer, Ivory Tower Antiques, 38 Oak St., Ridgewood, N.J. 07450; phone 201-670-6191.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | By Kathryn Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
In a year when businesses are firing employees in droves, there is no such talk at Byers' Choice Ltd., a company in Colmar that creates holiday Caroler figurines. "We don't lay anyone off," even after the company's workload slows in January and February, said co-owner and president Bob Byers. In a grim yule season in which both shoppers and companies are working to keep costs down, Bob and Joyce Byers hand out hefty Christmas bonuses, pay their workers to take off the week after Christmas, and award $1,000 scholarships to each of their employees' college-bound children.
NEWS
September 7, 1999 | By Heather N. Bandur , INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It may be just a scraggly, old tree trunk to some, but to Bill Staas, it's a majestic elephant or a skinny St. Nick. For almost 25 years, the 79-year-old carver - who looks a bit like St. Nick himself - has made hundreds of figurines from basswood, sugar pine and poplar in the cluttered garage and basement of his red, ranch-style home. Although the ex-Navy man sells some pieces at local shows for between $30 and $300, he said he carved simply to keep his mind sharp. "I'll be carving until I die," he said, glancing at a handful of half-finished figurines and faces resting on a cardboard box in the garage.
NEWS
April 2, 1999 | JONATHAN WILSON / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Her umbrella echoing the hats on Japanese figurines in County Seat Antiques at Church and Gay Streets, Frances London of West Chester tries to stay dry during yesterday's rain. Today? A foggy, cloudy start, but by afternoon, some sunshine and higher-than-normal temperatures in the lower 60s.
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REAL_ESTATE
July 1, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The sensory shock begins at the front door: Everywhere you turn in the 1958-vintage Stratford home of Marvin and Flo Herring is something arresting, beautiful, unusual, or absolutely spectacular But that initial disorientation is brief, as the Herrings explain how this remarkable domestic art museum came to be. At its root is a collection the couple has nurtured since 1994 of antique Japanese figurines known as Ningyo. They first saw four figurines at an antiques show in Atlantic City and were smitten.
NEWS
August 29, 2012 | BY MICHAEL ELKIN
WHAT DO I want with a Hunter Pence bobblehead doll? This is not a rhetorical question. I am asking it directly to my Shane Victorino bobblehead figure sitting on the shelf right opposite me. He shrugs his shoulders. When the Phillies handed out Pence figurines the other night at the Park, it made me wonder why they would honor a player now in another club's uniform. Would the San Francisco Giants - which Pence now calls home - have handed out Willie Mays bobbleheads after he was traded to the Mets?
SPORTS
May 25, 2012 | BY TOM MAHON and Daily News Staff Writer
LET'S HOPE Roy Halladay doesn't try to imitate the stance of the bobblehead featured on MLB.com on Thursday.   According to the site, the figurine in the photo was never really offered. The site used the wrong photo of the item, taken from a prototype. But that won't stop us from poking fun at the flawed bobblehead. First off, Halladay is righthanded and his glove is on the wrong hand. Also, the ball is in his left hand, but he's using a left-leg kick. Finally, the beard is light brown, but the hair on its head is black.
NEWS
January 20, 2012 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
Suburban sales over the next few days will feature photo equipment and Fantasia figurines, weaponry and watches, and other auction activity - both alliterative and affordable. The photo equipment, much of it with the Profoto brand name, will be a highlight of Briggs Auction Inc.'s weekly variety sale, beginning at 4 p.m. Friday at the gallery at 1347 Naamans Creek Rd. (Route 491), Garnet Valley. It was consigned by two New York residents who in the 1970s and '80s ran a Greenwich Village studio specializing in rock bands of that era before switching to the antiques business and becoming regular Briggs customers, Briggs president John Turner said this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2010 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
THE NEW year ushers in a fresh start for many of Philadelphia's cultural institutions. Catch these events before they shutter for good. And don't say we didn't warn you. Franklin Square Remember summer? Prolong those sweet memories with one last visit to Franklin Square before the rehabbed park closes up shop until April. The mini-golf course, playground and Philadelphia Park Liberty Carousel are all open, despite the weather outside being more frightful than delightful. Kids are treated to their own version of New Year's Eve ( sans champagne)
NEWS
August 2, 2010 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bric-a-brac is everywhere in Isabel Silva's North Philadelphia rowhouse. China dolls in lacy dresses. Carved candles. Indian sculptures. Horse and elephant figurines. Knickknacks accumulated over a very long lifetime, filling shelf upon shelf. Given as gifts to the revered, 99-year-old matriarch of a large Puerto Rican clan, they are tokens of appreciation for her healing powers in the art of santiguar , a form of mystical massage practiced mostly in the Caribbean. Using pure olive oil, herbs, incantations, and intuition, she diagnoses and treats friends and family by stroking their aching joints and bellies with the swirling, sign-of-the-cross motions of her perfectly manicured hands.
LIVING
August 28, 2009 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
William H. Bunch Auctions and Appraisals' two-session pre-Labor Day sale will open Monday in Chadds Ford with a catalog auction of modern collectibles, featuring 120 lots of Royal Doulton figurines. Royal Doultons are not exactly modern, having been made since the early 1800s near London. But they are still being produced, retain their popularity and are comparatively inexpensive, in part because most are open stock, as opposed to the limited-edition status of other collectible porcelain figurines, such as Hummels.
NEWS
January 25, 2009 | By Sam Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Faith might move mountains, but can a small piece of plastic move a four-bedroom house? In this dismal real estate market, lots of people think so, provided that the plastic is a figurine of St. Joseph. Local shops that sell religious paraphernalia are reporting phenomenal sales of tiny statuettes of St. Joseph - the earthly father of Jesus and the patron saint of the home and house sellers - to real estate agents and homeowners. "We have over 5,000 items in our store," said Norma DiCocco, who owns the St. Jude Shop in Havertown.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2008 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In this season of elves, a lawsuit against Urban Outfitters Inc. is taking aim at another mythological creature adored by stocking stuffers: the happy-faced troll. A Danish company that produces the fuzzy-haired Good Luck Troll doll is suing the Philadelphia retailer and its California supplier for alleged copyright infringement. Troll Co. A/S contends that it holds the exclusive rights to produce and sell troll dolls with happy facial expressions and crazy hair in this country.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2007 | By Edith Newhall FOR THE INQUIRER
Ever wonder what happens to the house paint that's returned to the Home Depot because it was too strident a yellow for the dining room or too purpley a pink for the shutters at the Shore house? Quite a lot of it gets recycled into Jon Manteau's abstract paintings. In fact, all of Manteau's latest paintings and sculptures (he makes those, too) at Gallery Siano employ the detritus of everyday life. When he's not salvaging paint from Home Depot's "whoops" department for his paintings, he's picking up parts of toys, driftwood, plastic juice bottles, and other castaways for his found-object sculptures.
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