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Filet Mignon

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NEWS
July 4, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JIM PRESTON
SIZZLING SHISH KEBAB and filet mignon are served up by Jauan Cabalin, at left, the chef at El Tango Restaurant at 10th and Locust Streets. Cabalin was cooking yesterday at Penn's Landing at the annual Restaurant Festival, part of the city's Fourth of July festivities. Above, 2-year-old Joshua Cerando of Allentown gets a mouthful from Scott Grandi while Joshua's mother, Perian Cerando, gets ready to take a bite herself.
NEWS
February 26, 1997
It's still a surefire applause line when politicians pledge to go after the nation's welfare cheats. So, how about a hand for U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno, who's been going after some of the biggest welfare cheats in the nation? Lest anyone jump to conclusions, let's be clear that these cheats didn't just claim benefits for kids they don't have or buy filet mignon with food stamps or commit any of the other penny-ante abuses so embedded in welfare folklore. No, these big-time welfare cheats are corporations that have concocted all kinds of ways to claim government checks for health tests and services never rendered.
NEWS
June 12, 2006
THE LANDSCAPE of Philly sports has never been more embarrassing than it seems to be now. I don't know if there's a city in America that hosts four teams as committed to mediocrity as ours. The owners of these teams know that the fans will continue to come and pay their hard-earned money to support the teams. Why would they serve up filet-mignon when the fans of this city will gladly pay filet-mignon prices to see lunchmeat? The owners of these teams don't respect the fans because they keep putting guys like Ed Wade, Billy King and Bobby Clarke in decision- making positions when each of them shouldn't be trusted with the decision of what color shirt to wear in the morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1996 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
You might not be familiar with the Sawan family by name, but there's a good chance you've eaten at one of their restaurants. There's Cedars, the Middle Eastern place that opened 10 years ago on Second Street below South. Another is Fez, home of Moroccan food, which opened a few doors away five years back. To better your chances of dining with them, the family recently added a third spot to its dining repertoire - Sawan's Mediterranean Bistro, on 18th Street near Sansom. "Seems we open a restaurant almost every five years," said Mikhael Sawan, at 22 the youngest sibling of the clan.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1987 | By ROBYN SCHAUFFELE SELVIN, Daily News Sales Columnist
Cafe Borrelli, a small Center City eatery that rates an "A" for ambiance (pretty pink decor, lots of candlelight, a genial cocktail pianist) has a winner with its "Autumn Vineyard Dinners," three-course meals priced at $8.99 a person. Regular prices are much higher: Soups, salads and appetizers run from $3.25 to $8; entrees cost up to $21.50 (for two lobster dishes) and desserts average $4.50. The deal: Six nights a week, early patrons who've opted for the special select the soup or salad from that night's choices; an entree - choice of filet mignon, seafood pescatore, veal parmigiana, baked lasagne, chicken parmigiana or flounder almondine; and dessert du jour.
FOOD
August 14, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
HARVESTING BARGAINS You can expect to find bargains on fresh vegetables through the rest of the summer and into fall. So say government and private analysts after a U.S. Labor Department report that wholesale prices for tomatoes, lettuce and snap beans had fallen by more than 30 percent in July. Retail produce managers say lower shelf prices are just taking hold. HEALTHY TRENDS Households with children spend more food money on milk and sweets than anyone else. And higher-income families spend more on fish, cheese and butter.
NEWS
December 19, 2011
Chillin' Wit' is a regular feature of the Daily News spotlighting a name in the news away from the job. TWO HOURS BEFORE yesterday's game, City Councilman Jim Kenney, a lifelong South Philly rowhouse guy, is in Parking Lot D at the Linc with friend and fellow Eagles diehard Ray Pennacchia, senior vice president of NovaCare Rehabilitation. Kenney is sipping a 1986 Stags' Leap cabernet from the cellars of Canal's Fine Wines owner Charles Beatty. Steve Rommeihs, the Eagles' executive chef, offers a reporter a cup of the "Banging Crab Bisque" that the players get every Friday.
FOOD
June 23, 2011 | By Bill Daley, Chicago Tribune
Filet mignon is one of the tenderest and easiest cuts of beef to cook. Too bad it's also one of the priciest. Get the most beefy bang for your buck by serving this cut with a sauce that adds flavor, color, and texture. Here are three sauce recipes. All are easy to make, so don't feel you're stuck with serving one sauce at a time. Remember how half the fun of an old-fashioned beef fondue was having a variety of sauces on the table to dip your cooked meat into. Offer one, two, three (or more!
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1993 | By Maggie Galehouse and Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER
What is food to one man is bitter poison to others. - Lucretius, Roman poet and philosopher, 99-55 B.C. Lucretius wasn't just talking about food. He was commenting on taste. But 2,000 years ago, even he couldn't have foreseen the birth of light fare. Evidently, tastes change. Meat-and-potatoes culture, especially for baby boomers and busters, seems to have gone the way of Hot Wheels, pogo sticks and The Partridge Family. Today's "bitter poison" might translate into such words as cholesterol, fat and calories.
NEWS
February 2, 1986 | By Sara Solovitch and Amy Linn, Inquirer Staff Writers (Staff writer Sara Kennedy contributed to this story.)
Employees at the Bellevue Stratford yesterday greeted the news that the hotel would remain open until April 2 with mixed feelings, some viewing it as a reprieve that would not stave off a permanent closing. Sales managers who last week had worked frantically to relocate conventions and parties to other hotels now will be called back to try to recapture some of the business, employees said. One waiter said he did not know how the hotel would coax back those already sent elsewhere.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 9, 2012 | Mitchell Hecht
Question: What do you think about the use of "pink slime" in ground beef? ?Answer: With a name like "pink slime," it seems like "lean finely textured beef" has a serious image problem. I've seen the video of food chef and critic Jamie Oliver where he tosses scraps of meat into a washing machine to illustrate rather poorly the meat separation process, followed by the dousing of household bleach on so-called pink slime to make a dramatic point. This is simply not accurate. What is finely textured beef?
NEWS
December 19, 2011
Chillin' Wit' is a regular feature of the Daily News spotlighting a name in the news away from the job. TWO HOURS BEFORE yesterday's game, City Councilman Jim Kenney, a lifelong South Philly rowhouse guy, is in Parking Lot D at the Linc with friend and fellow Eagles diehard Ray Pennacchia, senior vice president of NovaCare Rehabilitation. Kenney is sipping a 1986 Stags' Leap cabernet from the cellars of Canal's Fine Wines owner Charles Beatty. Steve Rommeihs, the Eagles' executive chef, offers a reporter a cup of the "Banging Crab Bisque" that the players get every Friday.
FOOD
June 23, 2011 | By Bill Daley, Chicago Tribune
Filet mignon is one of the tenderest and easiest cuts of beef to cook. Too bad it's also one of the priciest. Get the most beefy bang for your buck by serving this cut with a sauce that adds flavor, color, and texture. Here are three sauce recipes. All are easy to make, so don't feel you're stuck with serving one sauce at a time. Remember how half the fun of an old-fashioned beef fondue was having a variety of sauces on the table to dip your cooked meat into. Offer one, two, three (or more!
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2010 | By Dan Gross
F RANKLIN OJEDA SMITH , a Sociology professor at Richard Stockton College, calls his recent appearance on HBO's "Boardwalk Empire" the "highlight of my career thus far. " He played Deacon Cuffy in a few pivotal baptism scenes in last week's episode of the show that takes place in Prohibition-era Atlantic City. Smith told us that his role on the show, which ended its first season last night, converges a couple of sectors of his life. He's lived and worked in South Jersey for nearly 40 years, and he co-authored a book in the late 1970s, as casino gambling came to Atlantic City, called "A City Revitalized: The Elderly Lose at Monopoly.
FOOD
April 15, 2010
Reader: I was in San Francisco and had dinner at Incanto. The offal dishes were outstanding . . . brains and sweetbreads risotto, tuna heart, kidneys. It was also refreshing to actually see chef Chris Cosentino working the kitchen. I wish there were more places in our area that served unusual dishes such as this. CL: We definitely took a small offal hit when Ansill closed, but it was only brief. David Ansill is back and cooking his marrow out at Ladder 15. Pierre Calmels is stuffing pig's feet with foie gras at Bibou.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2008
J OCELYN KIRSCH , on house arrest in the area, could be living somewhere on the Main Line. Kirsch was spotted Thursday afternoon shopping in Suburban Square and possibly leaving the Ardmore Farmers Market. She was accompanied by a large bodyguard type, says our spy, who knew that he had seen Kirsch because of the ankle bracelet on her leg. The 22-year-old former Drexel student wore a skirt and a headband on her hair. She is on house arrest after allegedly violating her bail in California by using a stolen credit card there.
NEWS
June 12, 2006
THE LANDSCAPE of Philly sports has never been more embarrassing than it seems to be now. I don't know if there's a city in America that hosts four teams as committed to mediocrity as ours. The owners of these teams know that the fans will continue to come and pay their hard-earned money to support the teams. Why would they serve up filet-mignon when the fans of this city will gladly pay filet-mignon prices to see lunchmeat? The owners of these teams don't respect the fans because they keep putting guys like Ed Wade, Billy King and Bobby Clarke in decision- making positions when each of them shouldn't be trusted with the decision of what color shirt to wear in the morning.
NEWS
January 18, 2006
IN A JAN. 13 article, ex-Eagle Corey Simon says that discontent on the team pre-dated T.O. He says the team's contract and personnel decisions led to players "thinking about themselves, they were thinking about feeding their families. " Enough already, Mr. Simon. That goes for you too, Mr. Sprewell, and any other pro athlete who has trotted out this sad excuse for a sob story. I don't begrudge pro athletes their salaries. Those contracts are a good example of an employee being rewarded for the revenue they generate for the company.
FOOD
September 29, 2005 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The aroma of sizzling meat swirled from his six-burner grill as Bob Cavanaugh flipped steaks of filet mignon on a perfect late-summer Sunday. Then he checked the row of sausages browning on the grate, as he prepared lunch for 175. He was not at a restaurant kitchen, or a catering hall, but among a green sea of Eagles jerseys in the parking lot of Lincoln Financial Field before the first home game. The tailgating began before dawn. By noon, the whole parking lot was eating. While there's no real living to be made at a tailgate - Cavanaugh's guests pitch in to cover costs - there's definitely a reputation to be maintained.
NEWS
July 4, 2004 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
At 44, Leo McGlynn isn't old enough to remember the era depicted in Happy Days. Or he wasn't, as the Web site of his Nifty Fifty's restaurant chain describes it, "fortunate enough to have been kicking around in the '50s. " Neither was Brian Welsh, 40, McGlynn's business partner, who is part of the hands-on management team of the Nifty Fifty's I visited in Bensalem and Folsom. There are four local restaurants in all, including one in New Jersey, all nearly identical 1950s diner re-creations.
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